NY COVID Deaths Stabilizing, Hospitalizations Down

CBS News reports:

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said Saturday that 783 people died in New York on Friday due to COVID-19. On Thursday, 777 people lost their lives to the virus. The day before that, the state reported 799 deaths.

The number of deaths is somewhat stabilizing, he said, but stabilizing at a “horrific rate.” Friday’s fatalities raise the total death toll in New York from the coronavirus to 8,627. The state remains the U.S. epicenter of the global coronavirus outbreak.

Cuomo said, however, that the numbers of people being hospitalized and admitted to ICUs are on a downward slope. Intubations are also down.

The New York Times reports:

The United States on Saturday surpassed Italy in the total number of confirmed deaths from the coronavirus, reaching its deadliest day on Friday with 2,057 deaths. As of Saturday afternoon, the total stood at 20,110.

Already the pandemic has put more than 16 million out of work, forcing President Trump into the difficult choice of reopening the country as the country reels economically from the coronavirus pandemic.

Deaths in the United States per capita remained lower than in Italy, though some experts have warned that geography and population density have helped cushion the United States so far. To date, the virus has killed 19,468 in Italy, or 32 individuals per 100,000 people. In the United States, the number of deaths per 100,000 people was six.

Agence France-Presse reports:

A new study examining air samples from hospital wards with COVID-19 patients has found the virus can travel up to 13 feet (four meters) — twice the distance current guidelines say people should leave between themselves in public.

The preliminary results of the investigation by Chinese researchers were published Friday in Emerging Infectious Diseases, a journal of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

They add to a growing debate on how the disease is transmitted, with the scientists themselves cautioning that the small quantities of virus they found at this distance are not necessarily infectious. High levels were also found on frequently touched surfaces like computer mice, trashcans, bed rails and door knobs.