MIAMI: University Pedestrian Bridge Collapses Days After Construction, Multiple Fatalities Reported

The Miami Herald reports:

The FIU pedestrian bridge across Southwest Eighth Street collapsed Thursday afternoon, trapping an unknown number of people and cars underneath.

The bridge was installed at Southwest 109th Avenue Saturday morning, intended eventually to provide pedestrian access across Tamiami Trail from FIU’s main campus to Sweetwater, where thousands of students live in off-campus housing or in FIU’s newer dorms.

Before Saturday’s installation, FIU said the method of overall installation significantly reduced the risk to workers, walkers, drivers and minimized traffic disruptions for construction.

  • Boreal

    Shit. I hope no one dies and their injuries aren’t severe. Wow.

    • Todd20036

      too late

  • WNY

    5 or 6 vehicles were crushed. Multiple fatalities.

  • bkmn

    That construction company will be declaring bankruptcy in 3..2..1

    • Todd20036

      Were any of the pedestrians killed?

      • WNY

        It hadn’t opened to pedestrians yet.

      • Paula

        The news said that the pieces had just recently been lifted in place for final construction.

        • TrollopeReader

          on Saturday ….

      • e’ville_globeguy

        Some pics show rescuers crawling between the walk and its roof, so there may have been construction people.

    • ranchdad

      Reminds me too much of the Nimitz freeway in northern CA when the earthquake hit in 89. Sad and tragic .. and yeah.. they probably built it this way to save time and money…

    • Joe in PA

      And likely w/ no insurance. But don’t worry the principles will re-open under a new name next week.

    • cleos_mom
  • Lumpy Gaga

    That David Mack tweet. Oy.

    I was sitting there thinking, “This doesn’t look so ba….”

    • Butch

      I was too. I didn’t realize people were trapped.

  • TrollopeReader

    Yikes.

  • skyweaver

    Wow those pics are really horrific

  • Rod Steely

    This is why we have regulations! Trump calls them ‘job killing” – well this bridge was People Killing

    • m_lp_ql_m

      Well, technically, it just opened up at least 5 or 6 jobs! (One for each driver killed.)

      • WNY

        ouch

    • boatboy_srq

      Key difference: with the people dead there are now jobs to be filled.

      /s

  • Tempus Fuggit

    This is the kind of thing that happens in backward, anti-intellectual banana republics with corrupt, regulation-averse governnents.

    • Todd20036

      And Florida is a red state.

      • Lizard

        I thought Miami was blue.

        • The_Wretched

          Big cites are blue. Florida used to be blueish to swing status. It’s currently red as to its government.

          • Lizard

            Even with the influx from Puerto Rico?

          • Todd20036

            Puerto Ricans haven’t been there long enough to vote yet.

          • m_lp_ql_m

            Puerto Ricans who would vote blue haven’t been there long enough. The PRs currently there are quite red.

          • Tulle Christensen

            I don’t know any red Puerto Ricans

          • B Snow

            I know two, who said they always vote Republican. They also said in 2016 there was no way in hell they’d vote for Trump.

          • Tulle Christensen

            are you thinking of Cubans?

          • Helen Damnation™

            Ah hell but they will godammit. Come on, November!

          • The_Wretched

            As todd said.

          • Joseph Miceli

            The Cubans have been controlling Miami politics for a very long time . Their anti-Castro status dovetails with the Republicans .

          • violamateo

            They’ve become so infuriated by the abuses of power and the restrictions on freedom of expression in both of the Castros’ regimes, that they ignore the benefits, such as the incredibly high standard in Cuban education (far and away the best in all of Latin America) and access to medical care. It’s really a shame.

          • cleos_mom

            Apparently they also ignore the fact that they’re living in Florida.

        • kareemachan

          With skeletor in charge?

          • Lizard

            The cities in Georgia are blue but our governor is a corrupt Republican.

          • Joseph Miceli

            that’s so cute how you say corrupt and Republican like they are two different things !!

          • Lizard

            True, but ours is even more sketchy and corrupt than most.

        • TampaZeke

          It doesn’t matter what color Miami is as long as TALLAHASSEE is deep red!

        • Sean Taylor

          that would surprise me

    • nocadrummer

      “Thoughts and prayers. This is NOT the time to talk about construction regulations.” – GOP

      My condolences to the friends and families of those who passed and those who were injured.

      • Joseph Miceli

        Criminal contractors will not obey building codes so why have them ?

        • BlindBill

          lowest bidder contract … architect will blame on engineers; engineers will blame on fabricators; fabricators will blame on installers; installers will blame the government building inspector. All contractors and sub-contractors have probably emptied their bank accounts’ started moving assets his afternoon’ and will shortly file bankruptcy. The government building inspector will be fired. The public university will be stuck paying massive legal fees and settlement costs that will be passed on to the public via increased taxes.

          and the contractors will be bidding again soon under a new business name.

          • Librarykid

            So you’ve seen this performance before.

        • Greg B.

          I think this is more complicated than a building code issue. There was either a major flaw in engineering calculations or a major flaw in execution.

          • Joseph Miceli

            You missed that I was comparing gun laws with building codes…but that’s okay. Not many people aspire to my level of bitterness. 🙂

          • Greg B.

            I shouldn’t have missed that. Good point to highlight the ridiculousness of the “…only outlaws will have guns” crowd.

      • Scott Carpenter

        Um – not shitting you – the construction company sent a T&P tweet.

    • WNY

      Because construction standards and regulations are for LibTards

      • liondon#iamnotatraitor

        …and the destruction of unions.

      • violamateo

        And anyway, we all know that the only infrastructure that REALLY matters has to do with building that “big, beautiful” wall on the U.S./Mexico border.

        • cleos_mom

          It’ll bring in tourist dollars. Bigly.

    • Paula

      Welcome to Trump’s America!

    • ErikDC

      Because private enterprise will always put their own profits over your safety. There is no excuse for a bridge falling down just days after construction. They were cutting corners for profit.

      • Joseph Miceli

        So we have the builder the engineer and the safety inspector who signed off on this that all need to be under a jail .

    • Mark McGovern

      Actually this also happened to an overpass in Quebec September 30, 2006; 5 fatalities and 6 injured. Structural fatigue in that case.

      • Librarykid

        This wasn’t up long enough to get fatigued.

        • Mark McGovern

          Oh I get that – it was brand new.

          • Librarykid

            I just meant that they are having to dig deep into their bag of tricks to find something to use because the usual bull crap won’t work. Notice that there is no hint of the tower that was supposed to hold it up? Maybe they should have had a checklist.

    • boatboy_srq

      In other words, Voldemort’s Floriduh.

    • ChrisMorley

      “The $14.2m project was funded by the US Department of Transportation.”

      https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/mar/15/florida-international-university-fiu-bridge-collapse-latest

      • Jamie_Johnson

        I knew they’d find a way to blame Obama.

    • Ninja0980

      Yup and when profit is more of a concern then safety.

    • Scott MB

      NO…this is what happens when you weaken regulations!!!!

      • Tempus Fuggit

        Y’might want to actually read the comment before contradicting it.

    • RemusL

      IOW, this is the sort of thing that happens in shithole countries.

      • Tempus Fuggit

        Well, toMAYto/toMAHto…

  • Sam_Handwich
    • Lumpy Gaga

      Even with this pic, you don’t get the message that multiple vehicles have been flattened. (Because you don’t see them.)

      • Lizard

        That pic of the workers on their stomachs conveys it. I’d be amazed if anyone in the cars survived.

  • Jay George

    What I really want to know, is who will the televangelists blame for this? /s

    • Stogiebear

      You can be sure that Pat Robertson will do so. It will be perfect justice if he drops dead in the middle of that delivery.

      • Natty Enquirer

        “This is what happens when you teach abortion in the colleges…”

    • zhera

      The kids against guns, obviously.

    • Lizard

      On a college campus? Liberal professors who are brainwashing good Christian children to vote Democrat and kill babies, of course.

    • stuckinthewoods

      They’ll blame gay marriage for weakening the structure of… everything.

  • Lazycrockett

    Just installed Saturday.

  • alc2018
    • Lumpy Gaga

      Too soon.

  • TrollopeReader

    950 tons of concrete ….

    (and a reminder that gov’t contracts usually go to the lowest bid price….)

    • Paula

      Our whole government is a collection of material, facilities, and services, all supplied by the lowest bidder.

      • The_Wretched

        Not lowest bidder under Trump but rather the one that will give the biggest kickback.

        • Paula

          *The lowest bidder provision doesn’t apply to members of the Trump family, cabinet members. minions.

      • TrollopeReader

        …and some doctor is last in his class at university!!

  • Lazycrockett

    Several fatalities.

  • Paula

    somebody’s concrete supplier must be owned by the Mob.

  • Raising_Rlyeh

    I know it’s uncommon, but shit like this is why I don’t like having to stop under bridges or overpasses while driving

    • m_lp_ql_m

      …or driving over bridges or overpasses.

      • Chicago joe

        Plenty of places give me that fear. In Dallas it’s 635, in SF I get very nervous under any highway since The Loma Prieta quake.

    • kanehau

      You’d hate the Nimitz highway here in Hawaii. It is exactly this kind of thing and there is no escaping it. You go for a good mile with another road just above your head – and old concrete structures holding them.

  • kanehau

    I’m not sure if I agree with using “BREAKING NEWS” in this case or not.

    • Christopher

      At least it’s accurate.

      • kanehau

        True

    • Todd20036

      I’m going to hell. That was funny!

      • Michael White

        I am planning to run the gift shop there. See you someday

    • Lars Littlefield

      Falling? Collapsing? Tumbling? Structural Failure News?

      • orion dumptee

        few years back (can’t remember where) similar collapse…contractor later admitted he had used SEA WATER (salt) in concrete mix to ‘save; money….

        • Lizard

          Did he not understand the purpose of the phrase “pillars of salt”?!

          • orion dumptee

            it was later determined that Lots wife was running the cement mixer

  • Mark

    When will they blame it on Obama? Or Hillary? Or????

    • bzrd

      a piece of straw

  • JoeMyGod
    • JoeMyGod
      • e’ville_globeguy

        The rendering in the story shows a cable-supported bridge. I’ve not seen any cables in the collapse shots. I wonder if they calculated that the span would self-support without the cables during construction?

        Anybody know how cable-supported bridges are usually assembled?

        • KarenAtFOH

          Hard to imagine that it would self support. As a pedestrian bridge, the loads from people would have been small compared to the weight of all that concrete. They should have had temporary supports underneath, but that might have blocked traffic lanes…

    • Paula

      Somebody get the engineering department on the phone.

  • matrem

    This is giving me Loma Prieta flashbacks.

    • JoeMyGod

      Exactly what I was thinking. The Embarcadero Freeway.

      • And especially the Nimitz Freeway in Oakland where the greatest number of fatalities were.

        • Natty Enquirer

          In fact it was the Cypress Viaduct that collapsed. Other side of the bay from the Embarcadero Freeway, which was happily torn down anyway.

          • Tulle Christensen

            Too many highways in California

    • I’m in a similar place but thinking of I-35 instead.

  • Charlie In SF

    It’s a safe bet the contractor(s) will never see the inside of a jail cell. We’re talking South Florida, which might as well be Naples, it’s so corrupt there. (As I recall, right before 9/11, ALL of the Dade County Commissioners were under indictment).

    • TrollopeReader

      as compared to the Naples, Sicily, and not Naples on the Gulf!

      • Tulle Christensen

        Thanks for that, having lived in Florida most of my life, I was wondering what a city on the southwest coast of the state had to do with a city on the southeast coast of the state

  • Stogiebear

    I’m no doubt paranoid about this kind of thing but every time I’m stuck under or on a bridge at a traffic light I wonder if it is going to collapse. The fact that a reasonably ration person wonders this says a whole lot about the general public being aware of the poor shape of our vehicular transportation infrastructure.

    • matrem

      That’s why you shouldn’t live in a Red state. It’s the third world.

      • JWC

        No its because Gays can get married

        • m_lp_ql_m

          True. Every time I’m stuck under my husband, I worry he’s going to collapse.

          • JWC

            oh slap I hope hubby was not reading this hehehe

          • RoFaWh

            You guys need to buy a sling. Very useful for all kinds of erotic play, not just brachioproctic intercourse.

            Be sure, when you install it, that every single support member (i.e. the chains and eyebolts) is able to support several times the FULL weight of the heaviest occupant expected. Otherwise you run the risk of progressive collapse: one chain fails and this puts too much weight on the others, so they give way one by one, too.

          • Alax Guardian

            Thanks for “brachioproctic”. Wondering how I’m going to throw that word out this week…

        • Paula

          Tohse Evil Gayz!

          • JWC

            to the GOP and religious Nutz we are always a good excuse

          • JWC

            ain’t we jest

      • Rambie

        Skokie is in Illinois not a Red state

    • Lizard

      Even knowing the likelihood, I’ll stop before the bridge and let jerks cut in front of me rather than wait under the bridge for a red light.

      In bumper-to-bumper traffic I just panic the whole time.

    • SkokieGuy- playing Helen card

      This one is in my area-ish [NW Highway in Des Plaines. Embiggen and you can see the sides of the overpass are held up with wood timbers. And I’m sure its way past its projected life. Always uncomfortable whenever I have to pass under it. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/2fc4ec791fe04e98bdc46caeb9f8b265d1590a6c51ba71f7b24a246f5e7b25ba.jpg

      • The_Wretched

        we have those ugly green things too. But yeah, that’s just waiting to fall over “structurally deficient”

      • skyweaver

        Holy cow, I’d be afraid to pass under it too, that looks almost Soviet era

      • Paula

        Is that the one that kills so many trucks trying to pass underneath?

        • Lizard

          I used to drive buses in college, and one girl sheared off the entire roof off a New Flyer on a low bridge. It wasn’t pretty.

          • Paula

            Damn! That would be scary.

          • Lizard

            It was just her and the check rider, and luckily neither were hurt.

        • SkokieGuy- playing Helen card

          I know the one you’re talking about, this one isn’t it.

          • Paula

            I found it. It is in Galesburg, Illinois. Eats multiple vehicles.

          • pch1013

            There’s another one in Durham, NC. A guy whose apartment overlooks it has tons of video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=USu8vT_tfdw

          • Paula

            The trucks going fast are really spectacular. I know that I shouldn’t watch but, I can’t help it.

          • chrisinphx

            Right! I feel bad for the folks in the rented moving vans. As if moving isn’t a big enough pain in the ass.

          • RoFaWh

            The problem with that bridge is that when built, it had a full 12′ clearance, but every time the road was repaved, a few inches were lost until they had a truck-eating bridge.

            This is speculation, admittedly, but it’s a simple explanation that explains the facts. William of Occam (of razor fame) would approve.

          • Alax Guardian

            I can’t look away! :-/

      • Bambino

        Infrastructure is not a sexy topic. Politicians never like to talk about it. Voters don’t care for it because the money spent maintaining them is not visible. This tragedy shall pass in the next news cycle.

        • SkokieGuy- playing Helen card

          Yup, basically agree. However I have often thought that our side should frame things like good pay for teachers, investing to improve crumbling inner city schools, make college affordable and the like should be framed as “investing in our nation’s most important infrastructure – our people”.

          Then instead of an expense (greedy teachers!) its an investment.

          Will it help? Who knows.

        • RoFaWh

          One of the more subtle distinctions between Canada and the US is visible almost everywhere: Canadian property owners maintain things properly; American ones seem to operate under the assumption that once built, no maintenance is required.

          By no means universally true, but this is the intuitive reaction to what one sees when travelling.

      • RoFaWh

        That’s a railroad bridge. Railroads seem to use wood, not steel and concrete wherever they can. Take a look at the Goat Canyon trestle east of San Diego.

        They may have given that practice up by now, but hundreds or thousands of timber-built trestles remain in service.

    • kareemachan

      But regulations are for libtards….

      /s

      My thoughts and prayers really ARE for the families of those hurt or killed. And beyond that, is a Gofundme site iin the making?

    • Stephen Elliot Phillips

      I get heebie jeebies stuck under an overpass in traffic or being in a parking garage. Im in los angeles. Earth quakes and such

      • Scott Carpenter

        I do, too. I started putting together an earthquake kit when Hair Furor got elected. I’m up to independent living for 3 weeks, minus tent and sleeping bags. Of course it’s stored in the garage, where I might not be able to get to it if the house collapses…

    • boatboy_srq

      20 years ago that would have been a phobia, and suitable for therapy. Now, it’s just common sense.

    • Mark_in_MN

      Rationality and wondering about such things can linger together in a weird limbo. I now live about 4 blocks from where this happened. (At the time I live about a mile away from it). So I drive over the new bridge frequently. It’s normal, but I’d be lying if I denied that it doesn’t frequently come to mind when crossing the river here. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/fac8dc177b9fead13ce3b57ab053eb247ae19227cbde623f3ee67a1f189f179e.jpg

      • Alax Guardian

        I had a terrible time going over the new bridge for about a year. That was my normal rush-hour path home, and I worked late that night. Missed out by half an hour, thankfully!

  • JWC

    Yikes methinks some question will be asked in several quarters

  • Ninja0980

    Several deaths reported.:(

    • Lizard

      Look at the workers on their stomachs to see under it. I don’t see how anyone in the cars could have survived.

      • Ninja0980

        I imagine they were declared dead at the scene.

        • Lizard

          If workers and responders can even get them out…

  • Lars Littlefield

    We are just bugs waiting to get squashed.

  • SkokieGuy- playing Helen card

    My father had a large piece of concrete fall from a highway overpass. It hit his windshield and partially entered the car. The only reasons he wasn’t killed is due to the fact that he was driving at 45 mph reduced speed because of (unrelated) construction AND the fact that he is a highly skilled (former racecar) drive and didn’t lose control of the vehicle.

    He was told by multiple attorneys not to bother suing, because you are suing the state in the state’s court system, so the chance of a fair outcome are almost zero. With today’s horror, the families could go after the state and the contractor, but the contractor will declare bankruptcy and the state will likely not find itself at fault and the families of the deceased will be screwed.

    • The_Wretched

      When the State is a bad actor, you can go to a committee hearing and beg money directly. It’s not a law suit and often works.

      • SkokieGuy- playing Helen card

        Interesting and thank you. But who’s committee? It goes back 10 years, so I’m sure way too late, but we consulted with multiple attorneys and insurance experts and no one had any useful suggestion on who to be made whole.

        • The_Wretched

          I forget, it was 15 years ago when I did a stint in the State House. One of the standing committees (finance??) heard the direct citizen complaints for reimbursement twice a year.

          • SkokieGuy- playing Helen card

            Really interesting, thank you.

    • Greg B.

      But the contractor is insured. The insurance company won’t file bankruptcy.

      • SkokieGuy- playing Helen card

        Good point. Let’s hope the families get some financial relief, even thought it obviously can never undue the horror of losing a family member

  • Natty Enquirer

    Ironically, this bridge was built using a new technique that was supposed to promote safety during construction.

  • Piernudo15

    WTF? Is Florida cursed? So many recent tragedies there.

    • Tulle Christensen

      Yes God is punishing us for letting Trump win the state

    • The_Wretched

      Lack of regulations makes a difference.

    • RepublicansRNotConservative

      Feels like it sometimes. Try driving here…thats a tragedy almost every day.

    • Paula

      Hanging Chad.

  • evanedwards

    Doesn’t look like it slipped from or displaced its pylons, looks like it fractured under its own weight. I wonder how the decking was joined to the central structural steel truss.

    • Todd20036

      Yup. The pieces were made with substandard materials. Whoever made the pieces is in a lot of trouble

      • Boreal

        Sounds like something in a trump construction project.

        • Joe in PA

          I wonder where the steel was imported from?

          • Boreal

            jina

  • zhera

    For some reason this is getting to me more than usual when it comes to accidents. There’s something about being trapped, crushed, no escape, that makes me almost hyperventilate. I’m not usually claustrophobic but damn!

    I hope they can get any survivors out quickly.

    • fkevin

      Perhaps you innately knew it is 950 tons.

      “Details about the bridge from a press release about its opening:- 174 feet long- Was put in place on March 10, 2018.- Weight – 950 tons- Largest pedestrian bridge move via Self-Propelled Modular Transportation, in U.S. history, according to senior project manager Rodrigo Isaza, from MCM, which partnered with FIGG Bridge Engineers to design and build the bridge.”

      http://wlrn.org/post/fiu-pedestrian-bridge-collapses-authorities-confirm-multiple-injuries

      • Paula

        I found this.

        Figg was fined for the South Norfolk Jordan Bridge collapse in 2012 in Virginia. According to the Virginia Pilot, the state issued four $7,000 fines, citing Figg for: modifying a girder without manufacturer’s written consent; not doing daily, weekly, monthly inspections; not providing adequate training for equipment; not having certain safety procedures in place.

        • E.J.

          They also designed the sunshine skyway bridge

    • Lizard

      I’m sorry to say that I have a feeling the people in those cars didn’t feel much of anything.

      • zhera

        Hopefully those who died went quickly. But there will be survivors. It’s amazing what people can survive, at least for a while. Crushed body but still functioning brain, lungs and heart? Nightmare.

        • Lizard

          There’s only about two feet of clearance, judging by the photos. I’m not hopeful.

  • JoeMyGod

    FIU is the fourth-largest public university in the country with 57,000 students.

    The largest is also in Florida, UCF in Orlando. (My alma mater.)

  • Paula

    From CBSNews.
    “The bridge was constructed using an innovative approach to bridge construction, meant to reduce potential risks to workers, commuters and pedestrians and prevented traffic tie-ups in the area.”

    They may have to rethink this one.

    • LesbianTippingHabits


      I love that kind of innovation. Just like soon-to-be-former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson at the State Department.

      Sad !

  • Rex

    This is why we should never take any day for granted.

    • Rambie

      Agreed

  • Natty Enquirer

    WH press conference has begun with a flat and unconvincing statement on the bridge collapse.

    • TexasBoy

      No doubt the President sends his thoughts and prayers.

    • coram nobis

      Would have been more suspicious if they had a preprepared statement.

    • Jon Doh

      Have they declared it as fake news yet?

      • Boreal

        They have to remove the bodies of the crisis actors first.

    • Greg B.

      Trump would’ve run under the bridge and held it up with his tiny hands to save everybody, had he been there.

  • boatboy_srq

    I do hope the architect was expelled fired.

    • Greg B.

      Architects don’t do the structural engineering.

  • Harveyrabbit
    • Tread

      Ha, you aren’t far from the truth.

  • Boreal

    OT:
    Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin has billed taxpayers for the most expensive flight options available at every turn, appearing to never even consider flying commercial as his predecessors did, according to previously unreleased documents obtained by Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW).

    https://www.citizensforethics.org/press-release/crew-gets-mnuchin-travel-documents/

  • Hank

    And the State Government wants to have Fracking in this state, that is barely above sea level to suck what gas and oil out. Never mind the water table, that we live on!!!

    • Tulle Christensen

      so fracking — yes
      offshore drilling — no

      *looks perplexed*

      are there even oil deposits under the state?

    • fkevin

      And then there are the Florida sinkholes. Imagine the sinkholes after fracking the permiable limestone running under most of the state. It will make the Oklahoma quakes from fracking look like kiddie rides.

      • Hank

        Energy Pro: Florida Is Not A Big Oil State. So Why Drill?

        http://wlrn.org/post/energy-pro-florida-not-big-oil-state-so-why-drill

        • Tulle Christensen

          I looked it up, Florida has 0.19% of the US oil reserves. So pretty much nothing

        • fkevin

          Good question. There is a history of much higher output in the state, but not in the everglades: http://blogs.platts.com/2013/01/07/florida_oil/

          “Florida’s oil production has dwindled over the years, but as recently as 1981 the state was producing over 100,000 b/d, according to data from EIA, the statistical arm of the US Department of Energy. Natural field declines paired with the oil price collapse of the 1980s to depress output, so that by 1990 it was a mere 20,000 b/d, and it has been well under 10,000 b/d for most of the last decade, EIA data show.”

          The last bit did catch my eye. Exxon is making money on it. It is taking decades, but it is a profit:

          “Then, according to Collier Resources, which owns leases at the Sunniland field in Collier County, Humble Oil (now ExxonMobil) discovered the Sunniland Trend in 1943.

          Garrett said South Florida production is from much shallower Cretaceous reservoirs of 11,000-12,000 feet, whereas in the Panhandle the formations are Jurassic age and are deeper.

          Sunniland has produced “something like 120 million barrels since 1943,” he said.”

      • Tulle Christensen

        It’s the limestone that makes me think the oil would have migrated to the continental shelves, but what do I know I am not a geologist

  • Sam_Handwich
    • Boreal

      Prayers? I think they’re going to need $$$$ to payout to the families of the victims.

      • Todd20036

        and a crane to lift the wreckage. I don’t think prayers can do that

        • TexasBoy

          Oh, ye of little faith /s

        • MBear

          faith can move mountains.
          Collapsed pedestrian bridges not so much

        • Hank

          יִתְגַּדַּל וְיִתְקַדַּשׁ שְׁמֵהּ רַבָּא. [קהל: אמן]

          בְּעָלְמָא דִּי בְרָא כִרְעוּתֵהּ וְיַמְלִיךְ מַלְכוּתֵ

          • Paula

            Oy!

          • Hank

            That is the beginning of the Mourner’s Prayer for the dead, in Hebrew, that is said during services, daily.

    • m_lp_ql_m

      No prayers from me, sorry. How about some thoughts? Those seem to work just as well.

    • Paula

      I am sending out thoughts that next time they don’t hire engineers that failed all of their engineering mathematics classes.

      • Boreal

        What do you have against trump U grads, Paula?

        • Paula

          LOL

      • Tulle Christensen

        Opps used concrete’s compression strength in the tensel strength calculations, so I guess I really did need rebar

        • Paula

          Hey, Bob, that was an 8, not a 3.

        • RoFaWh

          Concrete can be used in tension situations by pre-stressing it.

  • DisqusD37

    Money for a “wall” and military “parade,” but not for infrastructure. MAGA

    • Boreal

      Yeah but they are owning the libtards.

    • Natty Enquirer

      This was more a case of poor design and/or construction. The bridge was just completed.

      • DisqusD37

        Also a bad word with Republicans: REGULATIONS.

  • Lee Grupsmith-Pedersen

    Considering the volume of bad and/or stupid news that comes from this state, did somebody put a curse on Florida?

  • Leo

    OT. WH acknowledging Russians tried hacking into the electric grid. I suppose that’s related in a morbid way as it relates to infrastructure. Not posting the tweet in this thread as it figured it was inappropriate.

  • ‘Til Tuesday

    Some of the pics reminded me of the Embarcadero Freeway collapse in 1989 from the Loma Prieta earthquake, where the upper deck collapsed onto the lower deck. It was torn down after that.

    • Natty Enquirer

      That was the Cypress Viaduct of the Nimitz Freeway in Oakland.

      • coram nobis

        That’s right, but it took a 6.9 quake to bring it down. This was more like the Hyatt Regency walkway collapse in Kansas City in 1981.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyatt_Regency_walkway_collapse

        • Natty Enquirer

          Yes, I think we’ll find that a construction shortcut was involved here, too.

          • LesbianTippingHabits

            not just construction shortcuts.

    • coram nobis

      As Natty points out, it was the Cypress structure in Oakland along the Nimitz Fwy. The Embarcadero Freeway did get seismic damage, which gave its critics the excuse they needed to tear it down and revitalize the Embarcadero bayfront.

  • Gigi

    Why is it always Florida?

  • joe ho

    God must be punishing Florida for passing gun control.

    • Joe in PA

      Not to worry…Fox will be blaming the students.

  • TheManicMechanic

    This is what happens when work gets selected by picking the lowest bid.

    • Jonty Coppersmith

      You get what you pay for. Buy cheap get cheap, or as grandpa used to say “pay money, go to school”- in other words spend your money foolishly and learn a valuable lesson.

  • Henry Auvil

    This is tragic and gruesome beyond belief, yet somehow, a metaphor for something. Can’t put my finger on it. America, maybe?

    • LesbianTippingHabits


      Florida, definitely. Sad !

  • Bambino

    Contractors belong to this project must be shredding documents and deleting emails and phone records now. Damn! During day times on week day too.

  • AtticusP

    Donald Trump‘s name should be on that bridge: it’s a metaphor for his misadministration.

    • JP

      Please, don’t. That’s the opposite of what this story calls for.

      • AtticusP

        Thank you for your opinion, but I really don’t need the PC police.

        • coram nobis

          If there’s a Manafort tie to this bridge (see thread further on) then there’s something to this.

  • fuzzybits

    We have a couple of those glass enclosed walkways really high up on buildings. Always a little leery.

  • Stuart Wyman-Cahall

    Imported steel? We’ll soon find out. Btw, my hometown, Las Vegas has these pedestrian bridges up and down Las Vegas Boulevard. I can’t even imagine the horror.

  • JoeMyGod
    • Boreal

      Wow!

    • Ninja0980

      His bad week just got worse I imagine.

      • Lazycrockett

        As long as the check clears.

        • LesbianTippingHabits


          Donald Trump never pays his bills.

          Back in the day, Spy Magazine reported – with proof – that Donald Trump deposited into his bank account a check for thirteen cents.

          Seriously.

    • Tulle Christensen

      so Russian concrete?

      • 2guysnamedjoe

        Probably, since Fat Tony Salerno is no longer in the concrete business.

        • Danieruw

          So it was made of breadsticks?

      • jimbo65

        And Chinese steel. Very bad Chinese steel.

        • Tulle Christensen

          Has anyone seen a picture of any rebar in any of the wreckage?

          • Greg B.

            That’s not the issue.

      • Helen Damnation™

        Chinese steel?

    • Hank

      I do not know whether to Laugh or Cry upon reading this!

    • JoeMyGod

      On a hunch, I googled their name and Trump. Sure enough.

    • thrunch

      It’s too soon to say what the cause was … but my money is on the construction engineering. This bridge was designed as suspension bridge! I’d like to see what calculations the construction engineer(s) made that showed the span would be ok to be in place until the cable supports would be built and attached. Hmm. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/fd37fc4bc56ef947ed899353267c182e40cedcfaaac3f2c86ff374f15a984f08.jpg

      • ReaRea

        Nice post. Where is this rendering posted?

  • another_steve

    There is some wisdom in the bibles of the world’s religions.

    But concerning that day and hour no one knows, not even the angels of heaven…

    • Jalapeño Business

      Reminds me of the beginning of Dead, Like Me. George gets killed by a Space Station toilet seat.

      https://youtu.be/ugWpj88EWt4

      • Natty Enquirer

        When you gotta go, you gotta go.

      • samcollins

        I loved that show!

  • JoeMyGod

    The owner of the construction company chaired a fundraiser at Trump Doral.

    http://www.socialmiami.com/socialeyes/american-cancer-society-9023.asp

    • LesbianTippingHabits


      No surprise here. Donald Trump’s companies went bankrupt.

      Conor Lamb won in PA (no thanks to the Democratic establishment).

      No sane person would ever consider serving in Trump’s Cabinet.

      An excellent political metaphor, indeed. Joe, thanks for sharing.

  • Octoberfurst

    Florida congress: “Thoughts and prayers to the victims. And no, we won’t be looking at strengthening building codes . We have more important legislation to enact! Now let’s get a bill passed that puts those homos in their place. That’s what the people want!”

    • Tulle Christensen

      South Florida has some of the toughest building codes in the nation, too bad a little palm grease can get a passed inspection without meeting them

  • Natty Enquirer

    These are execs of the firm which built the bridge, pictured with Paul Manafort and the Chinese mogul who was looking to buy them out last year.
    https://s13.therealdeal.com/trd/up/2017/08/Executive-from-Munilla-Construction-with-Manafort-and-Yan-Jiehie.jpg

  • Sam_Handwich
  • Talisman

    The fewer the regulations, the better…whether it’s for banks, for construction projects, or for guns. A few deaths are just the cost of freedom, after all.

    • bzrd

      geeeeezzzzzz
      god controlling over population
      he works in mysterious ways

  • Hank
    • Hank

      We received the following statement from Frederick W Smith, CEO, FedEx in response to the petition “FedEx: End your partnership with the NRA” (http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/fedex-end-your-partnership), which you signed. We thought you’d like to see it.

      ——————————————————————

      Thank you for the opportunity to respond to the petition posted concerning the FedEx position related to the NRA. We’ve reviewed the petition, and as you’ll see from the public statements that we’ve made (included below), we are aligned with your call for meaningful restrictions on the sale of assault weapons. In fact, FedEx agrees that there is an urgent need for common sense solutions to the rise of gun violence in this country. We decided to become one of the first major corporations to make our position clear and support prohibition of assault rifles and large capacity ammunition magazines for non-military use, as well as enhanced background checks and significant increases in safety measures and technology to protect children and teachers in schools.

      While we are in agreement with your message concerning gun violence and strongly advocate for this prohibition on assault weapons and ammunition, we believe the focus of your petition on FedEx is misdirected, and want to share some facts to help clarify our position. First, FedEx and all common carriers operating under federal law have an obligation to transport items that are lawfully shipped and can be transported safely (see common carrier definition below). We follow the same federal regulations and obligations concerning the transportation of firearms and ammunition as all common carriers, including UPS. I also want to make sure you understand our relationship with the NRA as well as the service provided to the NRA by UPS. FedEx is not a member or sponsor of the NRA. We have never made a contribution to the NRA. UPS provides discounted shipping rates to the NRA directly while FedEx provides discounted shipping rates to independent small businesses and other members of the NRA through our alliance marketing program – rates that are consistent with those offered to more than one million members of hundreds of other associations.

      Some have asked why FedEx won’t simply remove the pricing program for members of the NRA. This would amount to discriminatory and punitive pricing to members of an association due to their political views or affiliation. We’re being asked to target a select group of American small business and individual customers solely on political grounds.

      At FedEx, we are proud to be a driving force in enabling global commerce. Because of the unique capabilities of our worldwide networks, we have been asked to cease serving or change prices for numerous organizations for political reasons over the years. Conservative groups have threatened to boycott FedEx if we did not cut ties with certain organizations they disfavor, and liberal groups have done the same many times. In all of these cases across the political spectrum over the years, we have never withheld service from customers or adjusted their pricing in response to various forms of social media pressure or misinformed press commentary. While your organization is not a member of our alliance marketing program, if it was and you came under political or social attack for views on an issue, be assured that we would take the same position we have taken here. We simply do not believe that we should target any customers for discrimination or punitive action based on their political stance. We believe it would be unlawful for a common carrier to do so.

      We at FedEx are completely aligned with you that gun safety and protecting our communities and schools is a critical issue for our nation, and I hope that I’ve been able to better explain our position. Thank you again for reaching out and allowing FedEx the opportunity to respond to your petition.

      Sincerely,

      Frederick W. Smith Chairman of the Board Chief Executive Officer FedEx Corporation

        FedEx Statement Issued 26 February 2018

      FedEx Responds to Questions on the National Rifle Association, Gun Safety and Policy FedEx Corporation’s positions on the issues of gun policy and safety differ from that of the National Rifle Association (NRA). FedEx opposes assault rifles being in the hands of civilians. While we strongly support the constitutional right of U.S. citizens to own firearms subject to appropriate background checks, FedEx views assault rifles and large capacity magazines as an inherent potential danger to schools, workplaces, and communities when such weapons are misused. We therefore support restricting them to the military. Most important, FedEx believes urgent action is required at the local, state, and Federal level to protect schools and students from incidents such as the horrific tragedy in Florida on February 14th.

      FedEx is a common carrier under Federal law and therefore does not and will not deny service or discriminate against any legal entity regardless of their policy positions or political views. The NRA is one of hundreds of organizations in our alliances/association Marketing program whose members receive discounted rates for FedEx shipping. FedEx has never set or changed rates for any of our millions of customers around the world in response to their politics, beliefs or positions on issues.

      FedEx Statement Issued 27 February 2018

      FedEx is aware there are some continuing concerns related to the NRA, and we want to provide important, clarifying facts. First, the pricing program that is the focus of these concerns is not for the NRA itself – it is for American small businesses and consumers that are members of the association. For shipping from its online store (http://www.nrastore.com/shipping-information), the NRA uses UPS and not FedEx.

      FedEx has never provided any donation or sponsorship to the NRA which is one of hundreds of alliance and association participants that serve more than one million customers. FedEx remains committed to all our customers and the pricing we provide them independent of their political affiliations and views.

      FedEx Statement Issued 28 February 2018

      To be clear, FedEx and UPS are saying the same thing about the NRA: UPS provides discounted shipping rates to the NRA, which uses UPS for shipping. FedEx provides discounted shipping rates to independent small businesses and other members of the NRA through our alliance marketing program – rates that are consistent with those offered to more than one million members of hundreds of other associations. Both FedEx and UPS are common carriers under federal law, and as UPS said, we are obligated to provide service to shippers engaged in lawful conduct with an item that is legal to ship and agrees to the company’s terms and conditions regarding the shipment.

        Common carrier en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_carrier A common carrier in common law countries (corresponding to a public carrier in civil law systems,[1] usually called simply a carrier) is a person or company that transports goods or people for any person or company and that is responsible for any possible loss of the goods during transport.[2] A common carrier offers its services to the general public under license or authority provided by a regulatory body. The regulatory body has usually been granted “ministerial authority” by the legislation that created it. The regulatory body may create, interpret, and enforce its regulations upon the common carrier (subject to judicial review) with independence and finality, as long as it acts within the bounds of the enabling legislation.

      A common carrier is distinguished from a contract carrier (also called a public carrier in UK English),[2] which is a carrier that transports goods for only a certain number of clients and that can refuse to transport goods for anyone else, and from a private carrier. A COMMON CARRIER HOLDS ITSELF OUT TO PROVIDE SERVICE TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC WITHOUT DISCRIMINATION (to meet the needs of the regulator’s quasi-judicial role of impartiality toward the public’s interest) for the “public convenience and necessity.” A common carrier must further demonstrate to the regulator that it is “fit, willing, and able” to provide those services for which it is granted authority. Common carriers typically transport persons or goods according to defined and published routes, time schedules, and rate tables upon the approval of regulators. Public airlines, railroads, bus lines, taxicab companies, phone companies, internet service providers,[3] cruise ships, motor carriers (i.e., canal operating companies, trucking companies), and other freight companies generally operate as common carriers. Under US law, an ocean freight forwarder cannot act as a common carrier.[2] The term common carrier is a common law term, seldom used in continental Europe because it has no exact equivalent in civil-law systems. In continental Europe, the functional equivalent of a common carrier is referred to as a public carrier[1] (or simply as a carrier). However, public carrier in continental Europe is different from public carrier in British English, where it is a synonym for contract carrier. General Although common carriers generally transport people[4] or goods, in the United States the term may also refer to telecommunications service providers and public utilities. In certain U.S. states, amusement parks that operate roller coasters and comparable rides have been found to be common carriers; a famous example is Disneyland.[5] Regulatory bodies may also grant carriers the authority to operate under contract with their customers instead of under common carrier authority, rates, schedules and rules. These regulated carriers, known as contract carriers, must demonstrate that they are “fit, willing and able” to provide service, according to standards enforced by the regulator. However, contract carriers are specifically not required to demonstrate that they will operate for the “public convenience and necessity.” A contract carrier may be authorized to provide service over either fixed routes and schedules, i.e., as regular route carrier or on an ad hoc basis as an irregular route carrier.

      It should be mentioned that the carrier refers only to the person (legal or physical) that enters into a contract of carriage with the shipper. The carrier does not necessarily have to own or even be in the possession of a means of transport. Unless otherwise agreed upon in the contract, the carrier may use whatever means of transport approved in its operating authority, as long as it is the most favorable from the cargo interests’ point of view. The carriers’ duty is to get the goods to the agreed destination within the agreed time or within reasonable time.

      The person that is physically transporting the goods on a means of transport is referred to as the “actual carrier.” When a carrier subcontracts with another provider, such as an independent contractor or a third-party carrier, the common carrier is said to be providing “substituted service.” The same person may hold both common carrier and contract carrier authority. In the case of a rail line in the US, the owner of the property is said to retain a “residual common carrier obligation,” unless otherwise transferred (such as in the case of a commuter rail system, where the authority operating passenger trains may acquire the property but not this obligation from the former owner), and must operate the line if service is terminated.

      In contrast, private carriers are not licensed to offer a service to the public. Private carriers generally provide transport on an irregular or ad hoc basis for their owners.

      Carriers were very common in rural areas prior to motorised transport. Regular services by horse-drawn vehicles would ply to local towns, taking goods to market or bringing back purchases for the village. If space permitted, passengers could also travel.

      Telecommunications In the United States, telecommunications carriers are regulated by the Federal Communications Commission under title II of the Communications Act of 1934.[6] The Telecommunications Act of 1996 made extensive revisions to the “Title II” provisions regarding common carriers and repealed the judicial 1982 AT&T consent decree (often referred to as the “modification of final judgment” or “MFJ”) that effectuated the breakup of AT&T’s Bell System. Further, the Act gives telephone companies the option of providing video programming on a common carrier basis or as a conventional cable television operator. If it chooses the former, the telephone company will face less regulation but will also have to comply with FCC regulations requiring what the Act refers to as “open video systems”. The Act generally bars, with certain exceptions including most rural areas, acquisitions by telephone companies of more than a 10 percent interest in cable operators (and vice versa) and joint ventures between telephone companies and cable systems serving the same areas.

      The FCC classified Internet service providers as common carriers, effective June 12, 2015, for the purpose of enforcing net neutrality.[6] Before that time, the Good Samaritan provision of the Communications Decency Act established immunity from liability for third party content on grounds of libel or slander, and the DMCA established that ISPs that comply with the DMCA would not be liable for the copyright violations of third parties on their network.

      Pipelines In the United States, many oil, gas and CO2 pipelines are common carriers. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) regulates rates charged and other tariff terms imposed by interstate common carrier pipelines. Intrastate common carrier pipeline tariffs are often regulated by state agencies. The US and many states have delegated the power of eminent domain to common carrier gas pipelines.

      Legal implications Common carriers are subject to special laws and regulations that differ depending on the means of transport used,e.g. sea carriers are often governed by quite different rules from road carriers or railway carriers. In common law jurisdictions as well as under international law, a common carrier is absolutely liable[7] for goods carried by it, with four exceptions:[8] ▪ An act of nature ▪ An act of the public enemies ▪ Fault or fraud by the shipper ▪ An inherent defect in the goods

      A sea carrier may also, according to the Hague-Visby Rules, escape liability on other grounds than the above- mentioned, e.g. a sea carrier is not liable for damages to the goods if the damage is the result of a fire on board the ship or the result of a navigational error committed by the ship’s master or other crewmember. Carriers typically incorporate further exceptions into a contract of carriage, often specifically claiming not to be a common carrier.

      An important legal requirement for common carrier as public provider is that it cannot discriminate, that is refuse the service unless there is some compelling reason. As of 2007, the status of Internet service providers as common carriers and their rights and responsibilities is widely debated (network neutrality).

      It is also important to remember that the term common carrier does not exist in continental Europe but is distinctive to common law systems, particularly law systems in the US.[9] In Ludditt v Ginger Coote Airways[10] the Privy Council (Lord Macmillan, Lord Wright, Lord Porter and Lord Simonds) held the liability of a public or common carrier of passengers is only to carry with due care. This is more limited than that of a common carrier of goods. The complete freedom of a carrier of passengers at common law to make such contracts as he thinks fit was not curtailed by the Railway and Canal Traffic Act 1854, and a specific contract that enlarges, diminishes or excludes his duty to take care (e.g., by a condition that the passenger travels “at his own risk against all casualties”) cannot be pronounced to be unreasonable if the law authorises it. There was nothing in the provisions of the Canadian Transport Act 1938 section 25 that would invalidate a provision excluding liability. Grand Trunk Railway Co of Canada v Robinson [1915] A.C. 740 was followed and Peek v North Staffordshire Railway 11 E.R. 1109 was distinguished.

      • Jonty Coppersmith

        Blah, blah, blah. Fuck him and FedEx.

      • RoFaWh

        You can tell Fedex’s reply is complete b.s. It’s too long!

  • Treant

    OT: Anderson Cooper broke up with his boyfriend, according to very fluffy Queerty!

    https://www.queerty.com/anderson-cooper-breaks-boyfriend-9-years-20180315

    • Hank

      I hope Kathy Griffin can comfort him!

    • Ninja0980

      Rumor has it he’s already found another beau to comfort him.

      • Jalapeño Business

        Google: Dallas radiologist Victor Lopez

    • Jalapeño Business

      Oh, just saw that. Andy should hook up with Andy Cohen. They’re made for each other. While you were over there on Queerty, did you see the latest rant from the Ambiguously Gay No Homo Bros, The Beckham Brothers?

      • Treant

        I skip any story about the Brother-lovers. Until the gay sex tape comes out, at which time I’ll point and laugh, of course.

        • Jalapeño Business

          You know they’re doing it. It’s a given. They’ve been jerking each other off since childhood.

  • Nowhereman

    Just curious, where did they buy the steel and concrete?

  • coram nobis

    Also on the Miami Herald page, a March 10 about the construction of the “instant bridge.” Big hurry, it seems.

    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/west-miami-dade/article204506084.html

    Instant bridge? Not quite, but in a single morning Florida International University dropped a new elevated pedestrian span into place over the Tamiami Trail to provide students a safe route over the perilous roadway for the first time. …
    — lede

    • TrollopeReader

      they are building bridges for a bike trail up here … but while they can put the bridge in in one day, it’s weeks and months of prep work for the support, siding, etc …

    • Ann Kah

      The builders were all high-fiving each other on their web page…which was immediately removed.

  • KarenAtFOH

    Holy shit, they just HAD to put up the span before the support wires were in place:
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/a5cbf6ec3a14951eeabb0e1b4cc98e5839f1c9322f15b19b4ffb9d976efd3928.jpg

    • Natty Enquirer

      Looks like the design was changed to a self-unsupporting truss.

      • LesbianTippingHabits


        Sad !

  • infmom

    If that “significantly reduced the risk” I’d hate to see what a “normal” bridge construction would be like. Probably leave a smoking crater 20 feet deep.

    Engineers no doubt went to Trump U.

  • mjsatty

    Is it too soon to discuss investigating ways to prevent this?

    • Rillion

      Yes, they need our thoughts and prayers right now. Maybe some day in the far future we can begin a discussion on ways to improve drivers’ responses to falling bridges.

      • LesbianTippingHabits

        Exactly.

  • Jean-Marc in Canada

    “The hubris of men will always turn back upon them” — Cicero

    This bridge, from what I’ve read and seen, was clearly built in haste and put up without any concern for safety. In the video in which they proudly show off how quickly it was put into place, you can tell it’s not built to stand without support wire or some other buttressing. Hubris & greed,.

    • Tmaximus

      The other collapsed bridges these companies constructed “with state of the art new high-tech materials” blamed one of the collapses on faulty girders.

      • northern_neighbour

        Translation of high-tech materials: … the steel was likely internally reinforced with a thick core of straw. Ancient Rome got around to these techniques towards the end as well.

        This also saves many greenbacks on the overall pre-opening costs. Not so much, of course, after the lawsuts start flying. 😡

        But hey! “American exceptionalism in infrastructure renewal!” Accounting ingenuity! Cost controls! Sometimes there’s gonna be collateral damage y’know …

  • stevenj

    Ugh – the photos remind me of the Nimitz Freeway collapse in West Oakland after the 1989 quake.

    • Tmaximus

      It’s been hours since the collapse in FLA and no cranes or other manners have been used to lift the slabs off those cars. Oakland’s collapse – rescue efforts began within minutes

      • Ann Kah

        If you’re in a pancaked car, “rescue” isn’t the first thing that comes to mind.

  • Tmaximus

    20 cars – they say – are crushed under bridge collapse …. ‘a state-of-the-art bridge made with new, high-tech materials’ … “Two of the biggest firms that built the Florida International University pedestrian bridge that collapsed today have recently been accused of unsafe practices….two other bridge projects of theirs collapsed.

    • LesbianTippingHabits


      But of course they got the contract; they learned from experience. Sad !

  • rednekokie

    Hmmm — was this constructed by the Trump Construction Company? I wouldn’t be surprised.

    • LesbianTippingHabits


      Well, Florida is ‘run’ – into the ground, that is – by Republicans.

      Sad !

  • Friday

    Are we ‘great again’ yet?

  • ceeenbee

    Regulations! Regulations! We don’t need no stinkin’ regulations!

  • UiscePreston

    If only we had properly funded and strictly regulated infrastructure. Oh wait.

  • LesbianTippingHabits


    More thoughts and prayers from Florida’s Republican ‘leadership,’ right?

  • Richard Schneider

    It looks like the bridge is a post-stressed unit — fittings are visible in photos of the ends. Miami Herald said the mayor said the contractor was “stress-testing” today. There was a crane in use onsite at the end that fractured — it’s visible in one video where people are initially running to the scene. Its position suggests to me it was lifting at one of the suspension cable attachment points on the canopy.

    I fear we will find that something went wrong with that.

    Screen grab below from video in the Herald story at http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/west-miami-dade/article205316174.html https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/56b4df857a334aac335ad2406485696520d41524b18770e27ea4ffa121cd7fa1.png

  • Paula

    I really hope this wasn’t as stupid as mixing up Metric units and Standard units.
    Ohhh, I thought used said it was in inches!
    Like this.
    https://www.wired.com/2010/11/1110mars-climate-observer-report/

    • Hue-Man

      The “Gimli Glider” is another metric/imperial mix-up.
      “…the fuel had been calculated in pounds instead of kilograms by the
      ground crew and the erroneous calculation had been approved by the
      flight crew.”
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gimli_Glider https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/d4ac04373adacadaa1bb6fbbdf6d239fac4fcd531fc7aac43dd7710885e9f87e.jpg

      • Ann Kah

        Details escape me, but there was a ship that was launched centuries ago that overturned immediately. Archaeological investigation found measuring implements still on board that varied from each other, and surmised that the different nationalities who build it simply had different units.

    • Ann Kah

      The Hubble telescope had a similar problem, I believe, requiring the space station guys to do repairs in space.

  • Thornton

    In a video regarding this incident, I heard that the construction company used to build and install the bridge had two other major construction issues due to faulty construction. Probably skimping on materials to save money. I hope they are sued so badly and the owners put in jail for malicious murder that the company goes under and can never recover. I wouldn’t even mind if the company owners and those involved with the project were all stood in a row and a HUGE block of concrete was dropped on them. If any survive, well, they possibly were not guilty. That works and saves the taxpayers a lot of money for trials and incarceration.