One Million Moms Vs Scholastic Books

Just in from Monica Cole:

Everyone is familiar with Scholastic Inc. Their book fairs are popular fundraisers at your child’s school. However, Scholastic is not safe for your child and parents should be warned. Scholastic Inc., the world’s largest publisher and distributor of children’s books, is using its platform to promote pro-homosexual and pro-transgender books for children.

The corporation, for example, published a pro-transgender book called George for 3rd graders. “When people look at George, they think they see a boy,” the book reads. “But she [George] knows she’s not a boy. She knows she’s a girl.”

According to its website, Scholastic Inc. reaches 6 million children per week with its publications. It features morally toxic reading lists for children, such as: “Books for Two-Mommy Families” and “Great books for Two-Dad Families” and “6 Picture Books About Transgender Children.”

The American College of Pediatricians warns: “Conditioning children into believing that a lifetime of chemical and surgical impersonation of the opposite sex is normal and healthful is child abuse.” Scholastic does not have our children’s best interests at heart. Tell Scholastic to stop harming children.

TAKE ACTION: Please use the information we have provided on our website to contact Scholastic, Inc. and ask that they discontinue publishing and promoting pro-homosexual and pro-transgender books for children.

As many of you surely know, the American College of Pediatricians is a tiny far-right group that has deceptively mimicked the name of the nation’s largest and legitimate professional group for pediatricians.

  • Pardon me, I just sprained my eyeballs.

  • BlackGayVeganAtheist
    • Treant

      “We’ll print more. Buy 200 and get the bulk rate!” –Scholastic

    • Lazycrockett

      “It was a pleasure to burn.”

    • ted-

      Hopefully they used GOPs for kindling to start that blaze.

    • Jim Michaud

      Look at it this way: in order for books being burned, they had to be bought.

      • BlackGayVeganAtheist

        I know that but they really do not…remember those coffee makers

    • Chuck in NYC

      I hope those weren’t Encyclopedia Brown.

    • ChrisInKansas

      Fire And Fury.

  • Kristin Powell Strong

    Don’t be fooled; the American College of Pediatricians is NOT the same as the American Academy of Pediatrics. ACP is a small, fringe, politically motivated group. Nice try, though.

    • Kristin Powell Strong

      By which I mean nice try on the Million Moms’ part.

    • Ben in Oakland

      Don’t be fooled. One million for these moms is exactly the same as 33 moms with too much time on their hands,

      • Butch

        Once again to quote Fonzie Bear, “they round up.”

      • kareemachan

        And too many pitchers of martinis.

        • Ben in Oakland

          Or not enough.

      • Joseph Miceli

        Seriously! Just who the hell are these people? Who is the face of this operation, or is it secretly Bill Dono-ho in a dress typing in his basement.?

        • Ben in Oakland

          Don’t be silly. Bill would never be in a dress in his basement. That’s what the streets are For!

        • nocadrummer

          They’re housewives with too much time on their hands.
          They can’t control their kids, so they want to control others’.

          I’d bet most of their husbands cheat on them.

          • B Snow

            And probably with other men.

      • netxtown

        and 30 of the 33 are just kind of pissy cuz their vibrators don’t go vroom! no more.

      • SilasMarner

        More like 33 moms with broom handles stuck up their asses. Unclench ladies, life will be much happier.

        • Ben in Oakland

          Bonus! you’ll be able to do your christian housewife duty and sweep the goddam kitchen floor!

    • (((GC)))

      ACPeds was formed by a few dozen doctors who couldn’t stand the fact that AAP found nothing wrong with lesbians being parents.

      They’re not the only right-wing group with a misleading name. Take ACLJ (“American Center for Law and Justice”) vs. the ACLU (American Civil Liberties Union).

      • Ted.OR

        And the ACLJ was founded by none other than our old friend (I use that term loosely), Pat Robertson. (However, I do mean old.) Now that he has a law school at Regent University, he can keep pumping out christianist lawyers by the score. Ugh.

    • Christian1234567

      ACP is a recognized hate group.

    • jerry

      When science/facts/reality contradicts the right-wing narrative, they ALWAYS create a new group that will give them the answer they wanted to hear.

  • JAKvirginia

    Acknowledging something exists is not “promoting” it. Asshats.

  • penpal

    Her president wants to nuke millions of babies off the planet but some pro-inclusion books are what set her off.

  • DisqusD37

    Sooooo…. by “pro-homosexual” do you mean “does not demonize”?

    • m_lp_ql_m

      Pro homosexual as opposed to an amateur homosexual.

      • JW Swift

        Just how DOES one turn professional? (Asking for a friend.)

        • another_steve

          It’s like the Boy Scouts. There are levels of accomplishment depending on how many hours you devote to various activities.

          We could discuss, but I understand that 3/4 of the people who read this blog do so at their workplace.

          Must keep it dainty and clean!

          • JW Swift

            (sigh!) I had dreams once of leaving amateur status behind and going pro…

            Not likely to happen these days, as old as I feel anymore. All these young whippersnappers would have me for lunch (but then again, maybe that wouldn’t be such a bad thing…)

      • (((GC)))

        As in “gay for pay”? 🙂

    • another_steve

      I’m impressed that these theofascist monsters know / use the word “transgender.”

      They must truly be the intellectually elite of theofascist monsters.

  • m_lp_ql_m

    If only I had access to their ‘pro-homosexual’ books 40 years ago.

  • safari

    Million Moms kept the vowels in homosexual. How offensive.

    • (((GC)))

      They’re denying it the respect that Orthodox Jews give to G-d.

  • Stephanie Perdue

    I just don’t get why people are so opposed to this stuff. Do they really think that some child is suddenly going to decide they are transgender, gay, or lesbian, just because they read about it in a book?

    Do they not realize the very real emotional pain that children who DO identify as transgender, gay, or lesbian go through when they do not see anyone reflected in things they read/see and only get messages about how they are a terrible awful person?

    I know it sure would have helped me when i was a kid growing up to know that I was okay.

    Keeping knowledge from people doesn’t make them any different, it just makes their life harder.

    • Ben in Oakland

      That’s exactly what they think. They also don’t think.

    • Mikey

      to answer plainly: yes, these people are actually under the delusion that people are that easily affected by what they read. They are also absolutely incapable of understanding that not everyone shares their radical fundamentalist interpretation of their bronze age religious beliefs.

      • Christian1234567

        Children actually are easily affected by what they read. Reading books about those who differ from oneself can increase empathy. That’s what terrifies bigots. They don’t want their children or other children being empathetic toward those who differ from themselves.

    • Tor

      They are afraid a child with “different” feelings might feel normal.

    • Treant

      To some extent, they’re still stuck on the disease paradigm; if nobody got exposed, nobody would be gay. Wrong, of course.

      There’s also a note of, “Don’t normalize this and let them win the social war.” It’s too late on that one.

      They also dislike that they’re no longer openly able to discriminate without a rousing “Fuck you” getting launched into their faces. That’s also not going to change, so make sure to insult them at every passing turn.

    • They want the freedom to brainwash a child into absorbing a sense of “supposed to want” in order to override “actually want.” And this is because the fundamentalists don’t see children as little independent and unique human beings, but rather simply property. Or at best a pet to be trained.

      It doesn’t occur to them, nor do they care, that instilling this inverted persona does lasting, often lifetime damage.

      Put simply, these archaic fundamentalists believe they have a right of absolute dictatorship over how others feel, live, and exist.

      One thing I realized when I finally ‘came out’ in my early 30s and my family did not react well at all, and my father spent the next decade threatening to kill me: I was expected to live the entirety of my existence a particular way, just so these others would not experience discomfort and would feel a sense of control over me during the brief moments each day or week when they might just happen to think about me.

      That’s what this comes down to, really: A desire on the part of some to dictate how others live. Or, if they can’t have that, for others who are different either to be invisible or simply not be allowed to exist at all.

      • Galvestonian

        You’re describing the Catholic Church.

        Massive, huge, suffocating bags, dumptrucks, tankers, steamrollers of oppressive GUILT ! It take years to scrape, vomit, puke and sandblast it out of the system.

        • I am describing a great many things, not just one particular religion.

          • Galvestonian

            Becca, sorry didn’t mean to criticize – just describing my own rather pissy experience.

    • Christian1234567

      They think that being LGBT is contagious. They don’t care about LGBT children beyond bullying them and making their lives harder.

  • AtticusP
    • JAKvirginia

      I love poetry. 😊❤

    • Richie Kau

      I needed that laugh…thanks Atticus!

  • Treant

    This one seems really easy to solve.

    If you don’t want your children to read these books, don’t buy these books for your children.

    But honestly, if you want to ban them? I get to ban what I don’t like. Which would include your Wholly Babble, particularly that sick motherfucker, Ezekiel. Also, Adam and Eve’s sons clearly porking and having children together, since no women are listed.

    • (((GC)))

      And Noah’s Lot’s daughters getting him drunk and having sex with him.

      And many more examples.

      • Ted.OR

        Not to pick at nits, but it was Lot’s daughters who got him drunk and had sex with him.

        Noah, on the other hand, was seen naked by one of his sons, and that caused a major scandal. I read one theory that says “seeing someone naked” is biblespeak for having sex with them. Similar to “knowing someone”.

        • (((GC)))

          Thanks; corrected.

          Possibly worth a read: The Harlot by the Side of the Road: Forbidden Tales of the Bible, where Jonathan Kirsch adds to the commentary about some of the “good book”‘s dirtiest and most scandalous stories, and speculates about possible underlying stories that didn’t get told in their full gruesome glory.
          https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/438766.The_Harlot_by_the_Side_of_the_Road

          • Ted.OR

            Thanks for the pointer. I’ll have to check it out. Funny how the christianists never talk about those stories.

  • Rex

    I remember getting Scholastic flyers at school and wanting to order books but my parents wouldn’t let me order any, they told me they didn’t have the money. I realize now that they didn’t want me to learn how to read because they were hoping I’d be President one day.

    • Lazycrockett
      • Rex

        OMG. I’m back in third grade. Look at those prices. My parents really were poor, but when I got a paper route I did buy some books. I remember reading “A Chimp in the Family.” Read the description of the book – then substitute “gay son” for “chimp” – still holds up.

        • Michael White

          Did you read the Hardy Boys mystery books? Loved them.

          • Don_K

            I was more of a Tom Swift kind of guy.

          • JWC

            I , Nancy Drew hmmmm should have caught it then

          • David Walker

            “…a Tom Swift kind of guy,” he typed quickly.

          • Ted.OR

            Admittedly, Tom Swift books were a favorite of children whenever they went into the hospital.

            “My toothpaste fell on the floor,” said Tom, crestfallen.

            “I thimply do not underthtand thymbolic litht prothething,” Tom lisped.

          • (((GC)))

            Those and Nancy Drew.

          • netxtown

            Hardy boys AND Nancy Drew. Even then i believed in equality! 🙂

          • jerry

            My older brother got the Hardy Boys (I read most of those too), and I got “Alfred Hitchcock and the Three Investigators”. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/f462b9ae3288cddb629c21abbc2935cae46921aa11d72b333e4668220b929fe6.jpg

      • Lazycrockett
      • Wow that takes me back… and yeah, my family was never really well-off enough to afford even a fraction of the books I wanted.

        I do remember enjoying the gov’t cheese though.

        • Rex

          Government cheese is the best. And since it’s so binding you save on toilet paper.

          • Rambie

            But it melted into cheese sauses so well!

      • jliscorpio

        I used to order a book and a copy of DYNAMITE magazine every time.

        • Lazycrockett
          • jliscorpio

            Oh god Im old enough that I had this issue! Parker Stevenson take me away!

          • jerry

            Forgot about that magazine…got it maybe 4th through 6th grade.

        • Nowhereman

          I really liked Mad Magazine, especially Don Martin’s cartoons.

        • Jim Michaud

          I had a subscription to Bananas (their other mag).

      • netxtown

        I was the definitive bookworm as a kid. Those flyers would come – and I’d have checkmarks all up and down it. It would piss my dad off to no end cuz he didn’t want to spend the money and i should be out playing with the boyz. Mom would crawl up his ass – and he would relent, and i got my books.

        FWIW – I think reading is in short supply across America. I say that as I am 100% a believer that pretty much all of my ‘values’ were attained from reading – or at least all of those books formed the foundation for same.

        Kids today can handle a 140 cnt tweet (ooops – now 280!) and their minds wander from there.

        • David Walker

          Many years ago, an old woman, a former teacher, told me that she thought literacy had been in a decline since the advent of sound movies. At first blush, that sounds ridiculous, but she had a point. A lot of people went to the movies and if you wanted to know what was being said, you had to be able to read the title cards. That applied to horror movies, romances, comedies that weren’t completely slapstick, westerns, and on and on. It makes sense that being able to read made the movie-going experience more enjoyable. However, a general decline implies a high rate of literacy before silent movies, which isn’t true. Still, I loved her theory.

          • wds

            People were also incredible lip-readers … my Dad told me that people flocked to see a particular movie not for the movie itself, they came to watch the heroine swear a blue streak while the title card would say something like: That makes me so mad! … sorry, I can’t remember the performer or the movie …

          • David Walker

            I’ve heard that, too. According to Comden and Green, who wrote the script, the “love scene” between Jean Hagen and Gene Kelly, the pre-sound version of the scene, was based on reports of such things. Hearing-impaired people were either quite amused or angrily indignant about that happening.

        • Christian1234567

          I agree that reading has declined. Some of it can be attributed to misguided federal education policy that prioritizes test scores and adherence to sometimes developmentally inappropriate standards. When that happens, teachers are sometimes required to teach in ways that kill all enjoyment of reading (e.g. scripted curricula).

          • Galvestonian

            I can still remember when my parents took me to the local Free Library for a membership card. I think I was 6 or 7 years old. Hot Damn, I felt so rich … all of those BOOKS and I could look at them and pick them up and take them home to read. I was so HAPPY !!!!

          • RobynWatts

            Mine first-time public library moment was when my family moved to Bluffton, SC. in 1984. Coincidently, the town had opened its first public library that summer. Best part was that it was located just a few blocks from where we lived, which made life much more bearable at the time.

          • Ted.OR

            Yeah, but what books did they have? I bet it was Chaucer, Rabelais, Balzac!

          • teeveedub

            And a librarian named Marion?

          • Ted.OR

            Point of interest (well, at least to me)… I saw that in the fifth grade. It was the FIRST EVER musical play that I saw. And I liked it! Probably should have got my gay card right then and there.

          • Christian1234567

            Isn’t that an amazing feeling? I love that feeling, too.

          • janey

            In grade school, I checked out Nancy Drew books from the school library before walking home. In Jr. High the city library was a couple of blocks away and I walked (no school buses in that town) so I read my way along a shelf of books such as written by Alexandre Dumas and such. In high school we had a school library as big as the city’s. Again with no bus to catch, you could stay after school and do research or check out a book or two. I swear, it is the school bus system that has killed literacy!!

        • Ted.OR

          When I was in elementary school, shortly after the advent of fire and the wheel, we had “The Weekly Reader”. It was four pages, with smatterings of news, general interest, a story, a cartoon… just enough to hold our interest for an hour. We would read it in class, and then talk about the items. I still remember reading about the election between Dwight Eisenhower and Adlai Stevenson — in the third grade, no less.

          • Lelosh

            In grade school we all got a copy of the Weekly Reader (on Fridays, I think). I always read them and joined in the discussion later. For a few summers my parents bought for me the summer edition, too. I even got to see Dwight Eisenhower in person once! Our little town had a dedication ceremony in 1960 for the new interstate bridge between Minnesota and Wisconsin and President Eisenhower gave the speech. The good part is that it was quite a kick back then for a young kid to see a real, live president. The bad part is that the date makes me old as dirt now. 🙂

          • Mike French

            Me,too. I heard the vote counting on the radio. “Eisenhower, 16 votes…” etc. I wondered what a “boat” was, in that context. My dad’s explanation didn’t help.

        • jerry

          My parents were both teachers, so our access to books was never limited, including Scholastic orders. So I’ve been a bookworm since 1st Grade.

          • greenmanTN

            My parents weren’t teachers but both were heavy readers. Mom read mostly mysteries and dad read westerns. The defining bonding event with my dad was going to the newsstand on Sundays and he would buy the comics and books I stacked up, within limits (he bought books and porn mags), without paying attention to what they were. Poor man had no idea how many After Dark magazines and gay themed novels he bought me! He paid for a Gordon Merrick novel and that thing about curled my hair!

          • jerry

            My mother read all the time–mostly romance, but a little bit of everything, including my books after I’d read them. I remember her reading LOTR and Hobbit after I’d finished them the first time. But I don’t think they ever, even accidentally, bought me a porn mag or gay novel. But Fangoria, yes.

          • Reality.Bites

            I first remember seeing an After Dark in, of all places, the back seat of someone’s car who was driving my father and me somewhere. I don’t remember who or what the circumstances were – my father always had a car and so did my mother.

            I don’t think it was at an age where I was consciously sexual yet and masturbating but I do remember thinking it was an odd sort of magazine. And if you don’t know yet that a lot of gay men are into show business and barely clothed men, it certainly was an odd premise for a magazine.

            By the time I came out at 18 you could buy magazines like Blueboy. And I wasn’t all that into show business or the theatre at the time, so I never bought a copy of After Dark in my life.

            Gordon Merrick, on the other hand… BTW, the last time he came up here I did a little research and discovered he was a real person. I’d always assumed it was a pseudonym because those those books weren’t… art.

          • Reality.Bites

            I do remember my grandmother once wouldn’t buy me a mad magazine.. This one.

            I’d have been nine at the time and couldn’t understand why. I also had no idea what racial meant. I actually thought it went with special, like super duper, special racial. Blush.

            My grandmother, for her part, had no idea who Alfred E Newman was, and would have seen all those images as mocking the various races, which I’m not sure they are, especially in a mid 1960s context.

            https://img1.etsystatic.com/157/0/5937215/il_fullxfull.1186642273_sj4q.jpg

          • greenmanTN

            Thanks to Gordon Merrick novels I thought everyone had 12-inch penises!

            I don’t know anything about him. I liked the Nathan Aldyne gay mysteries though, and Felice Picano.

          • Reality.Bites

            The Nathan Aldyne books were so much fun. I thought they’d make a great TV series.

            And the absolutely AWFUL “Coming Out” novel, which trashed drag queens and leather men and just had AWFUL politics even for back then. But there was one scene where the closeted older man was furious with his young boyfriend for daring to answer the phone from one of his business associates saying “Your voice. All it says is ‘I suck cock'”

            A friend of mine have been repeating it to each other for close to 40 years now.

          • greenmanTN

            Mary! 😉

          • prixator

            This is very weird. I just read all the way down to here and I can’t believe how many of the things that you revealed about yourself are very familiar – we’re even the same age!

            I’ve never liked horror or violence in entertainment. I bought Blueboy as a teenager (also bought After Dark). Read MAD magazine growing up. I’m very introverted. I love owls. I love Perry Mason. And, I’ve probably forgotten a few other things.

            But, what made me comment was your mention of Nathan Aldyne – Daniel Valentine and Clarisse Lovelace! I also thought that these books with those characters would make a great TV series.

            I bought those books when they first came out in the 1980’s as small paperbacks. I’m pretty sure I bought them at Glad Day. I reread them so many times, they fell aoart and was so happy when they reissued some of the books.

            Since you researched Gordon Merrick (I read some of those cheesy things, too), you probably also researched Nathan Aldyne but, if not, that’s actually a pseudonym for two people. I think they might be dead now.

            Memories! I hope they last as long as I do.

          • Reality.Bites

            I once saw a cartoon that was something like a man berating a genie saying in front of a tiny man playing the piano, “I said I wanted a 12-inch penis, not pianist”)

          • greenmanTN

            I found a folder recently of things I saved from that time, After Dark photos some of them. Actors in their underpants, articles on “New Wave.” Imagine if you will a young boy in East TN with a copy of Interview magazine (the old huge format) tucked under his arm. Oh, I fit in like a glove!

            I was a big hit in Jr High.

            “Meet me after school and I’m gonna beat your ass!”

            “Yeah, that’s gonna happen. Don’t miss your bus waiting for me.”

          • Reality.Bites

            Oh God. That was one of the things of boyhood I just Did. Not. Get. Why on earth would anyone ever agree to fight someone else over something stupid?

          • greenmanTN

            Years ago I went in to get my oil changed or something, I forget what, but the mechanic working on my car was one of the bullies who made my life hell back then. We looked at each other, recognized each other, then he went about his job. Time is the great equalizer.

            That’s what hurts me bad about gay teen suicides. It all seems so damn important at the time, but it isn’t. Life isn’t a wonderland, but that shit is transitory and eventually you wonder why it seemed like such a big deal.

            One of the oddest interactions I ever had with someone was in a high school art class. We were assigned to tables based on the alphabet. So there was this really big guy at my table, not a football player but a bit hulking. So we were at the same table for a semester. Keep in mind that I knew I was gay but NOT openly gay, mostly just kept my head down. Out of nowhere he said, “You aren’t like people say you are, you’re actually pretty cool. I’d have sex with Mick Jagger if he asked.”

            WHAT?! That came from way out of left field and don’t even remember how I responded (thanks?) but it was rather sweet, a clumsy attempt to say a nice thing and I appreciated it.

        • greenmanTN

          Oh lord, I pored over Weekly Reader like a fiend! You would have thought I was deciphering the DaVinci code!

          It was NOT a Scholastic book, but my parents wouldn’t let me see the movie Carrie, so I read the book. I told everyone with great authority that Little Miss Hot Pants Of Sixth Grade was rushed to the hospital because she got her first period and the first one is always the worst. She had appendicitis.

        • Raising_Rlyeh

          I read so much as kids, something like a dozen books a week, and thankfully my parents didn’t care. They didn’t even censor what I watched or read, except for one case: my mom didn’t like us watching the Simpson’s. So I could read Peyton’s Place or watch Nightmare on Elm Street, but the animated adventures of Bart Simpson was just too much.

          When they did the reading placement tests, I think first one was in third grade, I was already reading at a high school level. Just wish I had more time to read now.

          • greenmanTN

            My parents never really limited what I watched or read, so the few times they did really stand out. The Helter Skelter TV movie was the first (I think) to have a “parental guidance is suggested” warning and they wouldn’t let me see it. I threw a FIT!

            I walked into the room (for some invented reason) where they were watching it with a blanket held up in front of me so I couldn’t see the TV, announcing that I was doing it because it might “rot my brain!!!”

            I really was a little shit.

            Little greenman, about to lose it with the photographer. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/77fe05e995a2e24a9e2b2cb006b606c869b49d3acad84394db0e43f2f0bf3cae.jpg

          • jerry

            Surprisingly, my parents let us watch “Helter Skelter” when it first came out (1976)…I was in 7th grade, and it still gave me nightmares for weeks.

          • Reality.Bites

            I think I was my own best censor in that regard. I can’t remember any interest in horror or violence. I’m also a few years older than you (I turned 18 in 1976) and it meant my pre-teen years were in a pretty tame time for TV. Sitcoms were utterly tame and sexless and for the most part so were the dramas. There really wasn’t anything for my parents to bother forbidding me. I had no interest in watching the Twilight Zone or the Outer Limits as a kid.

            My attitude towards horror is basically: don’t really want to see it on screen and will read it when Stephen King rights it, but generally prefer his work when it’s not horror based.

            I wasn’t much into TV dramas myself, but the ones I remember watching most with adults were Perry Mason (He was pretty much a god to my grandparents), Bonanza (my mother enjoyed it and I did too once I realized it wasn’t a cowboy show) and Wild, Wild, West with my babysitter. (Too young to appreciate whatshisname’s always naked torso. My crushes as a boy were more based on personality than looks.)

            In a way, when it comes to explicitness in movies and TV, I kind of grew up with my parents, because nudity and swearing in media barely existed till I was a young teen. The first movie where I saw breasts was Alice’s Restaurant when I was 11 or 12 – with my aunt. My mother and her cousin looked up sodomy and fellatio in the dictionary for the first time in front of me, from hearing it on the Hair cast recording that actually said the word “ass.”

          • jerry

            I loved watching the old horror movies, especially the Universal classics, from a very young age–though they would give me nightmares. Also liked “Wild Wild West”, but mainly for the https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/abf1835b92e6e2f08583e98b769cc72ed11037b96d1e4cb1442f3eb8862745b6.jpg Robert Conrad.

          • Reality.Bites

            At the time that was an exceptional body for TV.

            In these days, this is what a 44 year old unathletic nerd on TV looks like with no shirt.

            http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-x6bBMPr6eaU/VMvju6B1jAI/AAAAAAAAAKY/VLn41hJGcxc/s1600/81401.jpg

            And this is what parents with adult kids look like.

            http://www.newnownext.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/117450075.jpg

          • greenmanTN

            They wouldn’t let me watch the movie so I read the book. They should have just let me watch the movie!

            FWIW, “The Life And Times Of Charles Manson” is worth a read. It really puts things in a historical context. I thought the opening part about Haight-Ashbury residents’ attempts to take care of street kids, until “The Summer Of Love” became a media thing and so many kids flocked to San Francisco they were overwhelmed, was especially good. There were a lot of vulnerable children floating around and Manson was there to “take them in” and brainwash them.

          • jerry

            Yeah, many times I “wasn’t old enough” for some TV or movies, and I read the book instead…which was totally more explicit.

            One of the more frightening things about Manson, when I was that young, was constant rumors that he had escaped prison and was headed back to see his mother–in Charleston, WV–where he grew up, and not far from us.

          • greenmanTN

            No joke, I was reading Carrie (holding my books to my chest the “wrong” way, not to my side like boys are supposed to. I finally got a backpack to avoid that criticism.) and the elementary school librarian saw it.

            “Oh, ‘Carrie.’ My husband is reading that…”

          • jerry

            At school, I would somehow get a teacher to check out books from the adult section–you otherwise had to have permission from your parents. But through most of HS, my mother would get Stephen King books for me, so it mostly wasn’t an issue.

          • greenmanTN

            To this day I remember reading a really great book of Baba Yaga stories, the Russian witch who lived in a hut on chicken legs, and flew through the sky in a pestle, using the mortar to navigate. I can’t tell you how many times I tried to look up that book but I haven’t found it.

            Ah, childhood.

            I worked in a rare bookstore that specialized in children’s books, Oz books especially. At the time the Dick and Jane readers were highly sought after. It seems that with each generation we seek out a past that seemed so much easier, but that times changes with each new generation. For all I know “Goosebumps” and “Sweet Valley High” original editions are a hot commodity now. It wouldn’t surprise me.

          • jerry

            I’ve probably got “Goosebumps” boxed away, and I do have a number of the “Oz” books (all paperback editions).

          • Joseph Miceli

            Cute kid! I bet you grew up to be a handful, too!

          • greenmanTN

            I’m sticking with “willful.” Brat is so judgmental! 😁

          • perversatile

            The one and only time my Mom* ever said I ”shouldn’t” read something, was The Exorcist at around age 14, of course she was right, I had nightmares for a month.

            *The same Mom who gave me a copy of ‘Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Sex ( but Were Afraid to Ask)’ with the caveat, that when it came time for Dad to sit me down to have the “The Talk” he’d more than likely be rubbish at it, advising me to just nod and not ask him any overly difficult questions.

          • Reality.Bites

            I think your mom already told you more than you needed to know!

        • Rambie

          I didn’t catch the book worm until Freshman year of High School.

        • kirstin trans-girl mtf transge

          still gender diversity books help kids even today but a handful of transphobic parents want to treat there kids as if there suppose to be programmed to live out the parents dream rather then the kid to live out there own

          • kirstin trans-girl mtf transge

            i dont know much about the schoolastic i will add never really got those as a kid but this lawsuit is exaggerated and most likly fake as i find no supporting evidence to such a case and something like this would be all over the news

      • ChrisInKansas

        oh, that’s great. My folks didn’t have much money, either, but I always managed to talk them into one or two each go-around. We saw a box of paperbacks from this era at the flea market recently. At least 30 or 40 for only a quarter each. I would’ve snatched them up in a second if not for my husband silently asking me “and where are you going to put more books??”

        • Galvestonian

          I am sitting in a room with books packed to the ceiling in the double closet and about a quarter of the rest of the room waist high with more books. I currently have 2 storage units the floors of which are covered in boxes of books with antiques, furniture and light stuff stacked on top of the book boxes. That’s 3 or 4 house moves of stuff. I’m a museum curator and the collecting bug has me in it’s grip. It’s getting out to the yard sales, thrift shops and flea markets and seeing something you know is worth easily at over $100. and it’s marked $3.50. So what do you do ?

          Hey Mister, would you take 2 bucks ?

        • Reality.Bites

          And you didn’t think to respond “Your side of the bed if you don’t watch your tone!”

      • RobynWatts

        Nice. I’ll take ‘Trina’ and ‘The Childern Who Stayed Alone’, please.

      • Mrs. Councillor Nugent

        My parents allowed me enough spare change to buy some of the books around 3rd-4th grade I recall one about a youth who was lured by The Wrong Sort who encouraged him to wear blue jeans and a black leather jacket. That sounded vastly more interesting than anything else 🙂

      • Joseph Miceli

        I want “Trapped in the Ice” and “The Mad Scientist’s Club.” C’mon Mom, it’s for school! It’s educational!!!!

      • KathyCreighton

        Although Weekly Reader (published right here in CT) was gone by the time my kids got to grammar school, my parents started and renewed their subscriptions to Highlights from age 4 till 4th grade. The Scholastic Book Fair saw a lot of my parents’ money (for my books) and my money for my kids’. To this day-kids are now 25 and 33 people still hate to help us move because all three of us have many very heavy boxes full of books.

        • Bj Lincoln

          I loved the Weekly Reader and often wanted books form them. We didn’t have much money but my mom did have subscriptions to Highlights for years when the 4 of us kids were little. I loved to read when I was young. Always had a book in my hands.

    • ted-

      LOL

    • (((GC)))

      Did they realize that GOP would come to stand for Grabbers Of Pussy?

      • Rex

        If they did they were looking at the wrong son for that.

    • Michael R
    • Nowhereman

      They were only thinking of your welfare, eh?
      Reading was one of the only joys I had as a child. I especially liked Sci Fi, like Robert Heinlein, “Have Spacesuit, Will Travel” My mom read, too. She was in a couple of book clubs, like Reader’s Digest condensed books.

      • John30013

        Heinlein was my favorite too. I’d read all his young adult books by 6th grade, and then jumped into the adult world with The Moon is a Harsh Mattress and Stranger In a Strange Land. Red Planet was my favorite of his YA novels, but Have Spacesuit, Will Travel was a close second.

        • Galvestonian

          NO Ray Bradbury painted with words … OMG ! His ‘Martian Chronicles’

          “There was a smell of Time in the air tonight. He smiled and turned the fancy in his mind. There was a thought. What did time smell like? Like dust and clocks and people. And if you wondered what Time sounded like it sounded like water running in a dark cave and voices crying and dirt dropping down upon hollow box lids, and rain. And, going further, what did Time look like? Time look like snow dropping silently into a black room or it looked like a silent film in an ancient theater, 100 billion faces falling like those New Year balloons, down and down into nothing. That was how Time smelled and looked and sounded. And tonight-Tomas shoved a hand into the wind outside the truck-tonight you could almost taste time.” Ray Bradbury – The Martian Chronicles

        • Nowhereman

          It’s been a long time–I think that was the one with the cat having kittens in his suit. Stranger in a Strange Land felt like my auto biography. It really made me think.

    • Cackalaquiano

      Imagine if they had gotten all those books for you though. You’d have turned queer. /s

    • kirstin trans-girl mtf transge

      ive heard it several times that trump cant read tho i hate trump terribly i do wonder where that stemmed from if its true i mean i know he cant listen to major warning signs i mean hell he looked directly at the sun during an eclipse despite everyone telling him not to

  • alc2018
  • BourbonGal

    Inclusion and acceptance is a real bitch. /s

  • another_steve

    Wish that I, emerging as a queerling in the 1960s, had access to supportive books and magazines.

    All I had was Dr. Kildare.

    swoon

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/b086edd856744deb0cc82623d4416a488653b1a14ca04f0107b5a7a9e87cd537.jpg

    • Rex

      I’ve been told I look like Richard Chamberlain. I wish.

      • another_steve

        I see the resemblance.

        Are you available next Saturday night?

        • Rex

          I am. I’ll bring my latex gloves, it’s time for your prostate exam.

          • another_steve

            I’m getting excited.

            Say more.

          • Rex

            I’ll make sure my instruments are warmed up, but it’s not that easy at my age.

          • another_steve

            Lol.

            The ironic thing here is that tomorrow I’m scheduled for a routine colonoscopy and upper endoscopy. Things will be inserted in all my openings.

            Alas, I won’t be enjoying it though. :-/

          • (((GC)))

            I hope that everything’s normal and healthy, or if not, that it’s easily treatable.

          • another_steve

            Thanks sweetie.

            Bad things caught timely are often treatable. I believe the general recommendation these days is one colonoscopy every 10 years beginning at age 50 if your personal circumstances don’t warrant more frequent procedures (a family history of colorectal cancer, previous colorectal polyps, etc.).

            The prep for the procedure ain’t fun, but there are much worse things in life. 😉

          • Galvestonian

            Oh baby — poor baby … at least today they knock you out.

            My first routine colonoscopy was with some drugs that kept me fully awake but high as a kite. I liked what he was doing with my fundament and they had the most interesting movie on the television about caving that was really spectacular – it was like you were on some high speed rail car zooming through a really interesting cave in color. Man, I was just a ‘chatty cathy’ going on and on about how interesting it all was and giggling and carrying on about the similarities to other great caving systems in the U.S. They all though it was just hilarious.

          • another_steve

            Lol. Once had that experience myself. 😉

            Watching the screen while the procedure was in progress was a totally surreal experience. I remember having a vague sense (only the vaguest) that that was my insides I was watching, but as you describe, the drug was such that I was in fantasyland and didn’t really know what the hell I was watching.

          • Reality.Bites

            I wonder why they stopped? Sounds like fun.

      • James in Hollywood

        I see it. Your wish has come true.

      • Dude, from your avatar alone, you kinda do.

    • canoebum
      • another_steve

        A man in uniform…

        Say no more, say no more.

  • Joseph Miceli

    My parents weren’t the greatest and we didn’t have a hell of a lot of money either. In fact, I’d say we were pretty damn poor. When ever I came to my Mom with a list of 20 or 30 books from the Scholastic Book list there were no questions asked. I got every one of them.
    They’ll probably never read this, but thank you Scholastic Books. You gave me Achiles and Troy, Madeleine L’Engle, Narnia and so much wonder to distract me from all the pain of growing up gay in a small town. Now I hear that you are even helping kids that grew up like me.
    After 40 or so years it makes me want to buy thirty or so of your books again.

    • iambu

      Madeleine L’Engle FOREVER!

    • Christian1234567

      Please consider contacting Scholastic books. If they are going to be bombarded, let it be with grateful emails and not just with hateful emails.

      • Joseph Miceli

        You know…I will!

      • skyweaver

        Great idea, seriously great idea!

        • Christian1234567

          Thanks! I hope lots of people do contact them. It can make a difference in what they choose to publish and offer in the future.

      • jliscorpio

        Just tweeted @scholastic my support

        • Christian1234567

          Thank you! That’s a great idea, too! I didn’t think of using Twitter.

        • kareemachan

          Me too.

      • skyweaver

        I’m not on social media much anymore, but their email contacts for their various divisions is here: https://scholastic.custhelp.com/app/contact

        • Joseph Miceli

          I just finished writing them a love letter. 🙂

          • skyweaver

            Me too!

        • RobynWatts

          Thank you for the link. I owe Scholastic a big thanks for my love for reading and wrote to them as well.

    • Paula

      When they would pass those papers out, my sisters and I would look at them for hours. I liked the Encyclopedia Brown books.

      • madknits

        Sometimes my order in class would be the reason any books got ordered that month at all. There was a minimum, and I’d bring in my order for 9 or 10 books, and push it over the limit. My mother often said no to toys, but she almost never said no to books.

      • Joseph Miceli

        If it was spooky or science fiction-y I was ON it! 🙂

      • jerry

        Yes! Loved those, though I was hit or miss figuring out the mystery before the end of the book.

    • kareemachan

      So. Much. This.

      Except now that I think about it, Scholastic DID turn me into a lifelong bibliophile….

  • Blake Mason

    They kill two birds with one stone… keep them dumb and cut off access to the material.

  • Dayglo

    The One Million Moms can go get run over by one million moving vans for all I care.

  • Natty Enquirer

    This sex stuff pales in comparison to Scholastic’s demonic promotion of the occult in the Harry Potter series.

    • (((GC)))

      …and promotion of problem-solving and independent thought, rather than always trusting parents and teachers and praying to Jesus to solve everything.

  • Christian1234567

    Please consider contacting Scholastic and thanking them for inclusive publications for all children.

  • JWC

    yes it very important to keep our children ignorant and ill informed so that when they grow they will not question our narrow value and can perpetrate another generation of stupidity

  • iambu

    MONICA! Tsk! You know reading is not for the womenfolk! Go to your prayer closet.

  • shellback

    “…to promote pro-homosexual and pro-transgender books for children.
    Where the hell were they when I was a kid? Granted, Gutenberg was just starting out, but still…

    • Rex

      I had to learn from the paintings on the cave walls.

    • Ted.OR

      Well after all, I heard that the second book Gutenberg printed was “Slutty Bears In Heat”…. 🙂

  • Paula

    I occasionally bought a book when i was a full time teacher. I bought one about pictures of the Earth from Space. ( love looking at the sat pics of the earth) and I bought a bread cookbook and a meat recipe cookbook. You mean to tell me that I could have been buying GLBT books? Damn, why doesn’t anyone ever tell me these things?

    • iambu

      That’s why we have Monica! I use her as a TV guide.

      • Reality.Bites

        Cats report she also makes an excellent scratching post.

        • iambu

          XD

  • ted-

    My born again fundie sister believes in the American College of Pediatricians and quoted them to me in the past. *sigh…*

    These are some hateful moms…

    • Paula

      Mine too and she is a nurse! I called her about posting a link from them on her Facebook page. She deleted her account instead.

      • ted-

        That’s good too, I guess…

    • Friday

      I understand they are actually one Mom and a male board of directors from the AFA.

      • ted-

        That’s misleading…like religion.

  • KCMC
  • Yes, Scholastic operates under the radical pro-capitalist idea of supply and demand. If parents want these titles they will sell them and if parents are offended by any books they are free to not buy them.

    • JW Swift

      Indeed. Why does OMM hate the free market?

  • kareemachan

    I’m sure they will have as much luck with this as with their other endeavors.

    lulz

  • Tawreos

    I have spent most of my adult life reading books about nazis, for nazis and by nazis and I am still not a nazi and not very tolerant of them, and yet these assholes think that having books for gay families will make the kids gay or even worse, tolerant of gays.

    • LeeCMH

      I spent my whole life in a ferociously heterosexual culture. Television, papers, magazines, messages from parents, teachers — everything.

      I am not straight, even now in my 60s.

      These hateful Christians are animated by only one prime motivator, raw hatred.

    • Galvestonian

      Jahowl, Herr Oberleutnant …

  • safari
    • Treant

      Girl’s daft.

    • The_Wretched

      He’s personally very limited and can only understand life as a reality tv show with him as the ‘star’.

      • coram nobis

        “The Apprentice President.”

    • 2guysnamedjoe

      It’s all just another shitty little reality show to him.

    • ChrisInKansas

      Good Lord. And isn’t today the day for his “awards”?

  • Jefe5084

    Can I order a bunch of books from them online? I don’t have need for them, but…..

    • Lars Littlefield
    • Tawreos

      There is always a need for books.

    • R W C

      YES! And you can attribute your purchase to a school near you by using the Find A Fair website.
      http://www.scholastic.com/bookfairs/findafair

      • Reality.Bites

        So let me get this gay – we can donate books to school libraries?

        This sounds like a good one.

        http://www.scholastic.com/parents/book/george-0

        When people look at George, they think they see a boy. But she knows she’s not a boy. She knows she’s a girl.

        George thinks she’ll have to keep this a secret forever. Then her teacher announces that their class play is going to be Charlotte’s Web. George really, really, REALLY wants to play Charlotte. But the teacher says she can’t even try out for the part . . . because she’s a boy.

        With the help of her best friend, Kelly, George comes up with a plan. Not just so she can be Charlotte — but so everyone can know who she is, once and for all.

    • whollyfool

      The Dragonets of Destiny series was actually pretty good. Not Shakespeare, but lots of plot.

      We’ve read 9 of them so far. Then we give them to our 9 year old niece. 😀

    • greenmanTN

      Buy some and donate them to your local library, ALWAYS strapped for money.

      IRL I am quite shy, but when there was a movement afoot to close our local branch library (started by a Tea Party tool) I made sure to be at the City Council meeting to speak about the value of libraries, not just for books but their many services, including computers and internet service, which many people would be without if it weren’t for libraries.

  • jimbo65

    OT, sorry if it’s been mentioned. Seems like the Dem in the VA race that won by one vote, only to have it stolen from her by a suspicious ballot, conceded.

  • safari

    Personal OT: I’m in Macon, GA having a lovely lunch. But, I must ask: who thought plowing all the expressways together in Atlanta was a good idea? 7 lanes?

    • LeeCMH

      Probably lack of practice and materials. They only have to do this every 10 to 20 years.

    • The_Wretched

      That’s what you do when you want to have a single pass only and a huge amount of snow. Otherwise the snow forms walls between the lanes and that creates crashes during lane changes.

    • William

      Sometimes it’s worth taking 285 around.

      • E.J.

        285 traffic can be worse than 75 depending on time. I’ll usually go through town unless there is an accident

    • Galvestonian

      … and lousy public transportation. They’ve been studying a high speed rail line to Chattanooga for the past 50 years – every other Federal Administration kicks $10 or $20 million to the good Gubbermint of Gawgia to do a ‘study’ on it. It takes them a year or two to distribute it to the wives and cousins of local politicians. They have the timetables, the stops designed, the tickets designed, they have the paint colors of the stations, the font for the station signs, the landscaping at each station, the design of the automatic ticket dispensers, the proposed design of the cars – exterior and designer interiors, possible different class cars (1st, business and economy), debates on bar cars & refreshment cars, paint schemes and at least 24 different paint schemes for the cars, names of the scheduled trains, proposed routes, fencing designs, estimated amount of parking lot acreage, paving, entry from main highways. I believe they even have gone as far as to design paper plate, napkin and beverage cups for the damn thing.

      There’s still no train.

      • E.J.

        Ga. Legislators will not spend money on anything that might benefit Atlanta

        • LeeCMH

          I lived in Atlanta way back when they were beginning the MARTA train service. Lily white northern suburbs balked at the idea because they did not want “those people” shipped up to their area. (their claim)

      • LeeCMH

        Mass transportation in many Dixie cities is a racial issue, especially with the whites in control trying to keep the blacks contained.

      • Gretchen

        Are they serving Coke or Pepsi? That’s the real question.

    • E.J.

      I-75/I-40 just west of Knoxville is worse traffic wise.

      • Gretchen

        I avoid that area like the plague. I live in the Maryville area now, but for awhile we lived about a block official Kingston Pike at Cedar Bluff. It’s a nightmare.

        Are you local?

        • E.J.

          No, I live in the Atlanta area and have family in northern Ohio, so I drive through that area a LOT.

      • safari

        I went through that at like 8 at night, so it wasn’t too bad… that I remember.

  • Harveyrabbit

    “One Million Moms Vs Scholastic Books”

    LMFTFY…

    One hundred and sixteen mean, cranky women with too much time on their hands Vs Scholastic Books.

    • Treant

      vs. Scholastic Books, Who Didn’t Even Notice.

  • Makoto

    Well, I will take their advice, take action, and contact Scholastic about their LGBT acceptance. To thank them and encourage them to continue the work in the future to teach kids about how to understand and accept others who are not like them. It’s called empathy, and it’s really useful.

  • Henry Auvil

    My mom ran a kindergarten and nurtured several generations of five year-olds in our small Florida town. To this day people I don’t even know come up to me when I visit there and tell me what an unforgettable part she’d played in their lives. She LOVED Scholastic’s stuff.

  • The_Wretched

    gee, scholastic is teaching tolerance and anti-bullying, OMM sure has strange notions of what’s bad for kids and needs protesting.

  • Gregory Phillips

    I credit Scholastic books with giving me a life long love of reading – we weren’t rich but my parents always made sure I could buy at least one book per flyer –

    • doninkansas

      Same with mine, we were all big time readers and luckily our small town had a first rate library, kinda unexpected in a town like Poplar Bluff, MO. We were there at least once a week and all of us checked out our limit of books. I even got locked in the library one evening. Luckily the janitor was still there.

  • LeeCMH

    So the hateful Christian moms are mad at Scholastic.

    Gotta generate outrage to generate cash donations.

    That’s their business model.

  • Amanda B. Rekendwith

    …morally toxic reading lists for children…
    Unlike the “good book” she flogs…
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/aacb0a08ae93b009045fb339cd7a3fd3aba2c214337f49a4595f4a97e8612545.jpg

    • Reality.Bites

      That would be a fun sticker for travellers to carry with them. Chances are it would be months till someone sees it who would offended by it

      • LeeCMH

        Months, or years.

        I used to throw the Gideon’s in my rooms in the trash cans.

        • Reality.Bites

          I figure the vast majority of people who’d want to read a bible in a hotel room travel with one.

          In the last couple of years I’ve only been in hotels in NY and London. Don’t think it’s a thing in the UK necessarily. And in New York hotel rooms for every three bibles you leave out, you can fit in an extra bed.

      • Amanda B. Rekendwith

        Anyone for starting up an online business at pissoffafauxchristiantoday.com?
        $10 for 20 stickers, and all profits go to It Gets Better.

  • Chuck in NYC

    The main entrance to Scholastic is no longer on Broadway — but on Mercer Street. Not sure why that was changed, but they have maintained the big windows on Broadway advertising popular titles like Captain Underpants.

  • Frostbite

    As if their kids are actually taught to read. Too busy watching dirty tv at 10pm!

  • Galvestonian

    Someone should hack into the membership base of these ditzy bigots and find out exactly just how many members of this pseudo organization they actually have that are more than a couple of hundred real ‘moms’ ? Who is really backing them – The Mormons ? The Catholic Church ? Southern Baptist ? Ya just know that most real moms love their kids anyway they are – they just want them to be happy.

    • Taylor Bixler

      They are a “media watch group” spinoff of the American Family Association
      Tax exempt to boot.

      • Galvestonian

        Thanks Taylor – I figured that it was a bunch of asshat bigots like that but I’ll bet there’s a lot of $$$ coming from the big religions, too.

        • Reality.Bites

          Well no, because they don’t exist. The AFA does.

          And I think it’s an area of wingnuttery the major religions – even the SBC – are content to leave to the nut bar fringe of Wildmon and Fischer.

          Fake advertiser boycotts of mainstream network shows that air without issue on broadcast TV? They don’t have time for that nonsense that doesn’t work and would only make them look like idiots.

          You don’t see the Catholic Church complaining about the TV shows Bill Donohue does either. Big religions know better than to waste their credibility over things like suggestive salad dressing or pasta sauce commercials

  • Taylor Bixler

    I see AFA’s tax exempt outrage industry is at it again.

  • RickCabral

    “morally toxic” That’s a new one.

    Actually, I loved Scholastic, when I was teaching. You paid no tax or shipping and they bent over backwards to help if you made a mistake.

  • infmom

    My granddaughter, who has two mommies, really likes her copy of Heather Has Two Mommies (and the books she gets from Scholastic via her daycare).

    Better two mommies than those whackjobs’ notion of a million.

  • greenmanTN

    Like those bitches READ?!

    The Six-Pack Of Hysterical Harpies should go fuck themselves, since that’s one dirty job even Mike Rowe refused to do!

    http://r.ddmcdn.com/s_f/o_1/DSC/uploads/2014/05/mike-rowe-wicked-dirty-pictures0.jpg

  • David

    “One-Old-Guy” really needs to get a fucking life.

  • Lee Grupsmith-Pedersen

    My parents were avid readers (in multiple languages since they were both from Europe). There are baby pictures of me surrounded by Little Golden Books. That’s where I got my start. The next step was a Golden Book encyclopedia. Then I got a Britannica in High School. I cannot conceive of parents who would do was the OMM are promoting.

  • David

    How much do you want to be that “OMM” is in reality a couple paid Russian internet trolls.

    • Reality.Bites

      We already know what they are – an initiative of the American Family Association, an SPLC-identified hate group.

      There is no pretence that they’re an actual organization and not a brand name. Go to their pages. One thing you won’t find is a way to become a member.

      If you don’t have members, you’re not a group.

  • andrew

    Hopefully Scholastic Inc. will continue to thrive in 21st century America and ignore the 18th century primitives who challenge them.

  • Heaventree

    Well hell, OF COURSE these wackloons hate Scholastic Books. It has “Books” right in the name and scholastic excellence turns out the very opposite of the worldview of One Million Moms.

  • TimJ

    Not that it matters, but the “American College of Pediatricians” has an annual budget of about $80k. All those faxes must be expensive.

  • Michael

    I hate to say this but I hope people like these assholes burn in hell for being HUGELY responsible for the deaths of countless LGBT youth.

  • John Erickson

    Why do right-wing groups feel the need to adopt patently sleazy tactics? I mean, we know the obvious answer – but do they ever ask THEMSELVES this question? Why do we need to mimic the name of an actual, legitimate group, as if we’re trying to deceive people? Why should this be necessary if we’re right? Then again I suppose people like this are lost to any and all sense of moral responsibility whatsoever.

  • Jean-Marc in Canada

    Lying liars lie like liars lying.

  • Trevor John

    My favorite days were when the books we ordered arrived and they would be handed out in class. I loved the smell of the new books.

  • dcurlee

    What the fuck is wrong with these busy bodies. If you don’t want it don’t buy it

    • They don’t want their delicate offspring exposed to the real world. These whiny women want their children raised in the make believe world of the 1950’s. A land that only exists on tv.

      • Steve Teeter

        If they were only concerned about their own children, that would be okay. But they want more than that. They don’t want ANYBODY’S kids reading books they don’t like. The totalitarian urge is back again.

        • What do you expect from a religion that’s based on obedience and teaches that learning to think for yourself is the Original Sin?

        • Reality.Bites

          To be concerned about their own children, they’d have to exist.

          As I mention every time they come up, OMM is not in any way, shape or form a group. There’s no way to join, there’s no meetings, no organizational structure.

          It’s a series of branded press releases from ONE person and ONE person only.

      • CB

        And only existed on TV back then, too.

    • Phil

      Busy bodies or busy biddies?

  • KnownDonorDad

    The ACP is projecting regarding child abuse.

  • anne marie in philly

    I LOVED their books when I was in grade school! one miserable mom can go fuck herself!

    • Indeed. They got me in to reading.

      • anne marie in philly

        they advanced my skills; when I went into first grade, I was already reading at a 6th grade level. better than donald dump! 🙂

  • Reality.Bites

    Scholastic is the US publisher of the Harry Potter books.

    No right-thinking Christian has bought anything from them in 20 years. Right?

    • LeeCMH

      Oh now it makes sense. Yes, the Christians hate everything Harry Potter.

  • Dan Patterson

    One Million Moms, actually a Few Hundred Kunts who Kan’t Kount, has now attacked one of the god-lights of my childhood, so I hope this campaign fails like almost all of their others have.

  • Michael E Harrison

    Just posted this on their Facebook page. Let’s see how long it takes for them to delete it:

    Michael E Harrison I gave $100 to a local classroom for books last year. I’ll make sure to give them $100 and designate it for Scholastic this year. You all are a bunch of evil bigots that would vote for that pervert Roy Moore.

    • Michael E Harrison

      Poor little snowflakes deleted my post and blocked me lol

  • Bj Lincoln

    American College of Pediatricians is not real.

    • LeeCMH

      We have a radio hateful Christian preacher here who loves to bring-up every piece of propaganda from this sham outfit, along with his endless tirades against gay people.

  • Hue-Man

    Tell One Mouthy Mom to remain in the USA! CBC French series Hubert et Fanny has a 13-year old character, Justin, who believes he’s a girl. We’re at Ep. 1 so it’ll be interesting to see where it goes. Here’s Radio-Canada’s description of the character (google translated)
    “Justin is reserved, rather secretive, and convinced of not being born in the right body. No one is aware of his desire for transition, except for Fanny, to whom he recently confided. Justin is at the stage where he needs to experiment, to be certain of who he really is: a girl. The path will not be easy for him, nor for his parents, who will have to live with this confusing news.”

    I’m hopeful; the writer and producer is (out gay) Richard Blaimert (Sophie Paquin, Nouvelle adresse).

    https://ici.tou.tv/hubert-et-fanny (geo-blocked)

  • wds

    So, the 12 angry women with a fax machine have re-emerged to spout their usual c**p and bigotry … SMH As always, if they are upset about a book – then “F”ing don’t buy it … SMH

  • JCF

    Oh, how I LOVED getting the Scholastic brochures! I actually still own some of my Scholastic purchases…

  • Girlgoon

    Check the the website of the slowly boiled frog for more on the bogus group American college of pediatricians.

  • Girlgoon

    Two words to solve all the problems these people have with scholastic. Home schooling. I don’t want your kids in school with my kids as long as you feel it is your parental duty to mold them in to close-minded, backward bigots like yourselves.

  • kirstin trans-girl mtf transge

    we need transgender books to assure kids understand that there not defined by genitalia that theres a much bigger world out they that they have the ability to be who they are that theres nothing to hide those books show kids theres alot to life and there is nothing that can get in the way for them to be as happy as they can

    also the american college of pediatricians is a fake its a tiny far right group the post gort that right but many are not legally licenced many our undereducated all are bias based
    there goal was to attk the american academy of pediatrics one of the nations largest pediatrician organizations

    Always a girl Always myself

  • Jennifer Brandon Thompson

    One of the few times I enjoyed reading the comments. Thank you to all. I am transgender and I am happy that someone cares enough to be decent. Thank you all. It hurts otherwise.