Apple Sued Over Purposely Slowed-Down Older Phones

Reuters reports:

Apple Inc defrauded iPhone users by slowing devices without warning to compensate for poor battery performance, according to eight lawsuits filed in various federal courts in the week since the company opened up about the year-old software change.

The tweak may have led iPhone owners to misguided attempts to resolve issues over the last year, the lawsuits contend. All the lawsuits – filed in U.S. District Courts in California, New York and Illinois – seek class-action to represent potentially millions of iPhone owners nationwide.

The company acknowledged last week for the first time in detail that operating system updates released since “last year” for the iPhone 6, iPhone 6s, iPhone SE and iPhone 7 included a feature “to smooth out” power supply from batteries that are cold, old or low on charge.

Apple claims that unless they are slowed down, the older devices would shut down abruptly to prevent the battery from frying.

  • FAEN

    Really pissed me off!

    • Ron Robertson

      You’d rather your phone abruptly shut down?

      • FAEN

        Obviously not. I’d rather they tell me it’s going to slow down before they slow it down.

        • Ron Robertson

          Yes, they could have been clearer about it, I suppose. I’ve read that a full backup and restore can help too, if you think your phone is slowing down. If it’s under warranty they’ll replace the battery for you in the Apple store for free if it’s going bad. $79 otherwise.

          • FAEN

            My phone is out of warranty but I’m going to change my battery since it’s really starting to go specially on overly cold days.

          • Ron Robertson

            Who knows, maybe with all this publicity they’ll change it for you for free. Hope so, anyway.

          • FAEN

            I hope so too.

          • lymis

            Apple acknowledged that it was a software solution include in subsequent IOS updates, not an actual battery issue. If you didn’t update the software, the phone didn’t slow down. You’re defending something that isn’t what’s actually going on.

          • bobbybear.i.am

            But it’s almost impossible to keep iOS from updating.

      • Transparency, Ron. They intentionally slowed down all the older phones, thus increasing the push to buy new shiny ones. If they’d notified customers & given them a choice of slowing down their phone or replacing the battery for a fee, there wouldn’t be a lawsuit.

        • Ron Robertson

          If I’m not mistaken, the slowdown only happens if the battery is showing signs of not working as well. It’s not slowing them down just because it’s an older model.

          • ben

            This could be solved with a detection of that issue and a notification from apple of “buy a new battery.” It’s BS that the best solution to that is some wacky performance hack making the machine slower.

            And for the record, I know people who replaced their batteries and still experience the slowness issue.

          • Ron Robertson

            Then that’s probably something else happening. In that case, I’d try the full backup/restore thing so that things are not fragmented.

          • margaretpoa

            That doesn’t address the transparency issue though.

          • That may be true, but its irrelevant. Owners should still be notified; they may wish or need to choose full performance over battery life. But really, the chances of the battery amperage dwindling are highly skewed toward older phones. Lithium Ion batteries actually deteriorate as a function of time since manufacture.

      • Ron

        I think their “explanation” is bullshit.

        • Ron Robertson

          And you base that on what, exactly? The battery issue is a reality, it’s inherent in that type of battery.

          • ben

            doesn’t make any sense. There’s no reason why they couldn’t alter the update to not overheat older phones. There’s also no reason that I can see that a newer O/S would cause that issue to begin with – I am not aware of this issue occurring on any other platform, and Apple has a history of engaging in shady business practices to force people to buy new equipment for no other reason than that Apple wants more of their money (full disclosure: 20+ years as an application developer).

          • margaretpoa

            The battery issue is a reality. The problem is that Apple said nothing about it. Those users should have been made aware. Instead it looks like they just installed the software quietly, perhaps in the hope that people with older phones would upgrade to newer ones.

          • Ron

            It may well be a reality, an exaggerated one. Batteries can be replaced but that would cut into the sales of newer phones so of course consumers were not informed.

      • WKT20

        I’d rather know so I don’t spend hours getting frustrated and clearing stuff off in a vain attempt to bring it up to workable speed.

        • Ron Robertson

          True. But I think this lawsuit is only about lawyers getting rich, as far too many class-action lawsuits are.

      • Do Something Nice

        There ARE alternatives. And seriously, I don’t believe what Apple is saying.

      • talldoggy

        no – but I’d prefer a battery replacement plan that wasn’t through the roof expensive.

  • Lawerence Collins

    This isn’t news, is it?!? I’ve known this for years. I have an IPhone 6S plus.

  • R W C

    T’is the season for Class Actions! I have joined 3 in the last 6 months so sign me up. My old and only phone feels very violated!
    *clutches pearls*

    • james1200

      Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up!

      Oh, wait, wrong guy.

  • Joe in PA

    Can we go back to discussing giant penis pics?

  • shellback

    That’s funny. My phone didn’t slow down and the audio is still crystal clear. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/90cb713f680cf39695187ac5e7ce41c13416eeac212b82d5a5f8f3ec8c4eacae.jpg

    • orion dumptee
      • shellback

        I’d be using a candlestick phone even now if not for the humongous box it’s wired in to.

        • Rebecca Gardner

          Candlestick phones are so cool!

          • shellback

            Sadly, you couldn’t slam down the receiver in a fit of rage, and still have a usable phone.

          • orion dumptee

            as originally set up (the early days) for rage, you could take the receiver and hold it CLOSE to the mouthpiece..this would induce ‘feedback’..an electrical noise quite unpleasant to the other party…lol

          • SockMikey

            I want to click it a few times and see if it goes to operator!

          • orion dumptee

            sure it will, jus’ say into the phone CENTRAL? CENTRAL ? (then ask for an “outside;” line lol)

          • orion dumptee

            lot of fun to use..you need to use both hands, so you will also need a small table in which to place the martini

        • orion dumptee

          ..

        • orion dumptee

          well the ‘ringer box’ can be located most anywhere,under a wall table…or attached to the room baseboard..(.alternately..if roy moore,brian brown or f graham stop by…you can always stuff it up their……they might be reluctant at first..BUT..when those bells start to ring?? (oooooh) they’d never go back to digital)

      • dagobarbz, fine Italian shoes

        I remember the older phones because they used them in the Lassie tv series when I was a kid. I think theirs had a crank on the side.

        • orion dumptee

          sure, in the ‘rural’ farm phone set up ..you spun the crank,and the electricity produced (small magneto in the phone)…would ‘ring’ your neighbors bells on their phone and alert them that a call was coming thru…or… your phone ‘rang’ the rural operator..who would then ‘ring’ your desired party from her office.

    • Rebecca Gardner

      Remember when area codes were never used?
      Remember when the exchange number was a name? My neighbor was WELLS 1-4291.
      Remember when you were frustrated, or trying to win concert tickets from your local radio station, and forced the dial thingy back quickly so you could get to the next number quicker?

      Christ I’m old. LOL!

      • PickyPecker

        Do you remember there was a number provided by the phone company that you could dial and you would get the time and temperature?

        • Rebecca Gardner

          OMG YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

          At the tone, the time will be 9:45am…BEEP!

          • SockMikey

            That’s what Republic Bank told us when we called RI7-7477! 🙂 in Dallas.

          • Tristan

            Google is paying 97$ per hour,with weekly payouts.You can also avail this.
            On tuesday I got a great New Land Rover Range Rover from having earned $11752 this last four weeks..with-out any doubt it’s the most-comfortable job I have ever done .. It sounds unbelievable but you wont forgive yourself if you don’t check it
            !da143d:
            ➽➽
            ➽➽;➽➽ http://GoogleDailyConsumerCityJournalsJobsReport1/easy/jobs ★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫:::::!da143luuuuu

          • Robincho

            In San Francisco you just called 767-2676 (popcorn)…

          • perversatile

            ”The time will be…”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TWKBHzxDu20&t=66s

        • shellback

          In Boston, you would dial N-E-S-T-L-E-S

        • Phillip in L.A.

          In Los Angeles (310) 853-1212. It went out of service maybe 20 years ago; I remember there was an article in the paper about its ending

          • dagobarbz, fine Italian shoes

            Ermagerd, I memorized that number and it just came back to me! Only here, it was 619-853-1212

        • Boreal

          Yes.

        • Shawn Cullen

          There’s a 1995 British film “An Awfully Big Adventure” (based on a novel of the same title) where the time-and-temperature-number plays a pivotal part in the plot. The story is set in the late 1940s.

        • netxtown

          and dial-a-prayer, too!

        • juanjo54

          In SF it was POPCORN

          • JaniceInToronto

            That was a very long time ago, eh?

          • juanjo54

            It worked up until around 10 years ago or so. I remember a news blurb when they disconnected it.

        • FancyThat

          Boulder’s T&T still works! (since the 60’s/ 70’s-sponsored now): 303.443.1910. It’s warmer today!!

        • Schlukitz

          WE6-1212 and TI4-1212

      • Dan M

        My earliest number was Shadyside 5245. Wow, was that ever prophetic.

      • Rebecca Gardner

        I bet Millennials are reading my post thinking, “Is she fucking with us?” LOL

      • shellback

        The only phone number I recall from early childhood was my Grandmother – 353R

        • Butch

          Yeah; during the old party line days our number was 143J9. Then it became BRowning 9-6383.

          • shellback

            OMG I forgot about party lines.

          • Butch

            I remember getting yelled at as a little kid because I’d listen in.

          • dagobarbz, fine Italian shoes

            We’d unscrew the bottom of the handset and take out the dingus that made it work, so nobody could hear us breathe or snicker at other conversations.

            Remember when you could do that? It was a great prank!

          • Robincho

            Some guy took my dingus out the other night, but phones weren’t on either of our minds at the time…

          • shellback

            Photos or it didn’t happen.

          • dagobarbz, fine Italian shoes

            Did you tell him, “that is not a microphone?”

        • netxtown

          same here. her number was WhiteHall3-6323. Why I remember it – I don’t know cuz it’s been 20+ years since it was turned off.

          • SockMikey

            Hey, were you in Dallas near the Zoo. My grandparents had WH8- and were…. 🙂

          • netxtown

            they lived in Wichita

        • juanjo54

          My granny was Edison2-1452 and we like her had a three party line. Those were endless hours of amusement when I was a kid. The neighborhood gossip [well, one of them] was on our line and I learned a lot more about life than most 10-year-olds. Later as a teenager when we lived on Pohnpei in the Caroline Is.while my day was on his last Pacific assignment in the Navy, our phone number was 424. That was also a party line and I had several buddies who would come over to use it as they had no phone in the house and we did. Not that I ever extracted payment from any of them for doing so. But some guys do like a blow job while they are talking to a prospective girlfriend.

          • Lars Littlefield

            Bad boy. I like how enterprising you are. 🙂

          • juanjo54

            I was precocious. and a bit of an overachiever.

      • Remember when it was illegal to add another phone to your line? .. I do…

        • Rebecca Gardner

          Remember when you leased the phone from the phone company?

        • dagobarbz, fine Italian shoes

          Remember when you paid a lot for long distance calls?

          • Circ09

            And paid even more for local long distance. It was cheaper to call out of state than your friend the next town over!

      • Phillip in L.A.

        Yep! Our old number was GR2-#### (“GR” for “granite,” like in The Flintstones); grandparents’ was CR1-#### (“CR” for ???)

        • R W C

          CRestview or CRestwood?

          • Phillip in L.A.

            Yep, you’re right–CrestVIEW!

          • R W C

            271-XXXX

        • SockMikey

          We had a CRawford here in Dallas.

        • Guy in CA

          BRighton 0 was my grandparents number in Bel-Air since 1939. I still have the number today for my iPhone.

          • evan_or

            EXbrook 2 in Santa Monica for mine.

          • Phillip in L.A.

            Wow! Never heard of that one. Thanks for sharing, “Guy in CA”! 🙂

          • Guy in CA

            GRanite was local service and BRighton was Beverly Hills service. Similar for BH, CRestview was local and BRadshaw was LA service.

          • Phillip in L.A.

            Yes, that seems right–grandparents lived in BH, a few blocks from ill-fated Tate mansion [Benedict Cañon]

      • stevenj

        I use old phone numbers with exchanges like that for passwords. During a bathroom remodel several years ago I found a newspaper from the 60’s stuffed into the wall. The entertainment section alone was an absolute bonanza of phone numbers! BTW it was the first 2 letters that were capitalized eg: WElls1-4291.

      • Todd Allis

        I would sometimes jump to the next consecutive number while the dial thingy was going back. Like dialing 445, keep the finger in the 4, and then jump to the 5 to be ready to dial it once it’s back.

      • Rex

        I remember being on a “party line” – being able to listen in on neighbor’s conversations and having to wait to make a call until they were off the line.

        • dagobarbz, fine Italian shoes

          I remember that, too. Some neighbors just went on and on FOREVER, discussing nothing of interest, until someone yelled at them to get off the dang phone!

      • RaygunsGoZap

        HA! Where i grew up we still had party lines. To dial out, you had to pick up and listen to ensure no neighbor was already on the line.

      • SockMikey

        Posting here from AT6- (Atlantic6) – Dallas. Remember RI- Riverside was downtown Dallas (called for time & temp), OL (Oaklawn Dallas), LA – Lakewood Dallas, WH – Whitehall (by Zoo) and maybe a few more.

        Remember PARTY lines, where you’d pick up the phone and another person that shared the line was using it?

        This from early 60’s.

        List of old Telephone Exchange names 1955
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telephone_exchange_names

        • Lars Littlefield

          Party lines were what most folks had before the 50s. Our home phone number started out as 2912 in 1945. In the 50s it became 6-2912. By 1960 it became Skyline 6-2912 and settled down to finally be 801-756-2912. Try as I might, I cannot forget that phone number. Today, however, I can not remember my cell phone number to save my life.

        • stevenj

          RE: Time and temp…..Here in the SF Bay Area you could dial POPCORN and it would get you the time.

          • dagobarbz, fine Italian shoes

            Now I just ask Alexis, lol.

      • Ninja0980

        I’m old enough to remember when we had these attached to walls.

        • kanehau

          With a crank on the side!

      • jerry

        Until the early 1980’s, my parents’ phone was still on a party line…couldn’t use the phone if the neighbors were using it, and there was a special ring to know if it was for your house. Also, through most of the 90’s, on the local exchange you could just dial the last 4 digits…didn’t need either the area code or the next 3-digit prefix.

        • melllt

          My dad’s aunt had a party line with the special rings and for the longest time I thought she was so rude for not answering the phone every time it rang. So I answered it for here. That’s when i learned about party lines.

      • dagobarbz, fine Italian shoes

        We were BROWNING Six. BR6-2219. Now it’s just 276.
        And there were mysterious places where kids could yell out a phone number, a kind of Dead Zone between channels or something.
        Not a party line, but some utility Ma Bell used occasionally, and we kids the rest of the time.

      • Cattleya1

        Mine was Melrose 4-2616. person of a certain age here.

    • BlackGayVeganAtheist

      This is exactly what Apple is thinking with over 200 Billion in cash reserves… https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/fc1cc9f0dc1639a90ddeb6f6982bb89f4a7ca4d09331df938f1e575f3a34f450.jpg

    • nocadrummer

      What’s more gay than a PINK PRINCESS phone?
      (Yes, this was in our home growing up. And I STILL have it.)
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/7d870c3f59655d6d6705d691ddc7e696cf51d3b274949e1f76233b4dae1e1d3b.jpg

    • stevenj

      I have one of these (from the 1950’s) stored away. It weighs a ton.

      • shellback

        And I’d bet good money it still works like it was bandbox fresh.

      • PickyPecker

        I use one every day and it works great! 🙂

    • kanehau

      Bet you get lousy coverage when you’re on the road.

    • Robincho

      Does your number start with BUtterfield 8? If so, just tell everyone it’s BUttsex 8, and the calls will still come flying through…

  • bkmn

    As they should be. It is one thing to stop supporting old tech, but a very different one to sabotage your own customers to drive sales.

  • Rebecca Gardner

    I don’t own Apple products but work gave me an iPhone (what I call my electronic leash). Last year my iPhone just stopped working, I think it was a 5 something. Anyway, so did everyone else after we did a software update. I thought, hey that’s too much of coincidence. I didn’t care, wasn’t my phone, they got me a 6 something. So is this saying the same shit is gonna happen again until work buys me a new phone?

    • safari

      Or until the battery is replaced.

  • safari

    I think the only thing Apple did wrong here was not be transparent about what they did.

    • Bad Tom

      Agree. A pop up warning that the battery was aging would be very helpful.

  • netxtown

    oh now ya’ll are sounding like a bunch of whiners. Just git yourself on down to the Appley Store, take out a loan, and git a new phone. If ya wanna go fast – get out the cash.

    • safari

      I just went down to BatteriesPlus and got a new battery for $60

      • $60? Does it start your car too?

  • ElenorRigby

    they don’t “purposely slow down old phones,” exactly. Not the way the “Crab Apple Crybabies” are saying, anyway. Once the battery gets older, it doesn’t hold onto a charge as long and the phones go into a slower mode to keep the battery going longer. It’s not “software that makes the older phones slower once the new model comes out” the way “people who hate apple on principal” are saying.

    • lymis

      Nice try. That’s not what Apple admitted to. They admitted to including code in recent updates to slow down older phones on the claimed assumption that since they are old, they need to be slowed down. It had everything to do with the model of the phone, and nothing to do with the actual battery life.

      • Blake Paine

        No, the phone knows the age and condition of the battery and adjusted accordingly. A phone that had a battery that had a low number of full charge cycles wasn’t treated the same as one like mine where I have probably had a full cycle charge every day I’ve had it (use it quite a bit).

        And replacing the battery results in no slowdown at all no matter how old the phone is.

      • ElenorRigby

        I’m not “trying” anything. I don’t have a dog in this fight… just explaining that Apple didn’t slow down perfectly good phones in order to make you buy a new one.

    • Blake Paine

      The problem was the phone would try to draw more wattage than the battery could deliver and cause the operating system to crash. So apple power management would not let the chip request more power than the phone could deliver. Only on the intensive CPU tasks was there a ‘slowing’, low power usages worked the same as always. The obvious solution to a declining battery.

      The only error Apple made was not explaining that was happening up front with a dialog box and suggesting a battery replacement.

      • ElenorRigby

        I’m not “trying” anything. I don’t have a dog in this fight… just explaining that Apple didn’t slow down perfectly good phones in order to make you buy a new one.

        • Blake Paine

          They slowed them down so they wouldn’t suddenly crash under power usage demands the battery could no longer supply, and only those phones are slowed down.

          Again, their only error was in not telling you that a battery replacement would make the phone run at full speed.

          • ElenorRigby

            exactly… sorry, this was meant for the guy beneath you. 🙂

      • Rambie

        If anything it’s a case to bring back the user replaceable battery

        • Hell I even buy Mp3 players based on if I can just change out the battery.

        • Blake Paine

          Since few users would need to the overlying cost wouldn’t be worth it. Just knowing ahead of time that the option to replace is available would be enough n

          • Rambie

            The disposable society, most users really don’t need to change their phone as often as they do. Apple, etc make a mint off the cycle of selling new phones and the limited lifespan of the battery.

            The cost of taking an iPhone into the Apple store for a battery replacement is going to be near the replacement and similar with other phones (Samsung, etc). Where a user-replaceable battery would cost much less.

            Smartphones have become powerful enough for most users daily needs and there is little need to replace it after only a few years except for the battery which wears out faster and the fashion of having the latest.

            ifixit does a tear down each generation of phones: https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/iPhone+X+Teardown/98975

            https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/Samsung+Galaxy+S8+Teardown/87136

          • Blake Paine

            Again, Apple already offers battery replacement for only $79. Even my usage means ~$40 a year, less than half a month’s reoccurring phone bill.

            The clunky design that a replaceable battery requires isn’t worth saving the couple latté cost difference.

            Want a phone with a clunky battery box buy one but there is no reason they all need be that way.

          • Rambie

            clunky?! Phones had replaceable batteries for a long time and they weren’t “clunky”.

            Did I touch a nerve?

          • Blake Paine

            Touch a nerve? I’m not an emo millennial. Old design phones with replaceable batteries were universally clunky, I know, I owned a dozen or so.

            Again want a phone with a battery box buy one. Problem solved.

  • Lumpy Gaga

    My oldest Android tablets (made by Archos) had a setting built in to throttle the CPU to a slower, more battery-friendly speed. As they were bought for reading, meaning that you touch the screen only once every couple of minutes, that was actually a nice match.

    For actual reading, on most of my modern devices, I might as well be streaming netflix for the battery life I get. (Better reading experience is only gotten with higher resolution. But the higher screen resolution is a battery-killer. Hateful cycle.)

    For real books, I’m all about e-ink.

  • Do Something Nice

    ‘Smooth out’ = market strategy to make obsolete a product to sell a new version of that product.

    If Comcast did something like this, we would probably see mobs of people attacking Comcast offices.

    But it’s Apple so it’s all cool.

  • TexasBoy

    I haven’t noticed any slowdown in my iPhone 6+, but I’m not a power user. My phone has always had fairly short battery life. So many apps are power hogs, anyway. I did buy one of those portable chargers/batteries in a flash sale from Amazon, and it has worked fine. I intend to keep it until it stops being supported, then replace it with another iPhone. I did have an android as my first smart phone, it was awful, and I replaced it with iPhone as soon as I could. I don’t want another android.

  • safari

    While we’re on the topic of tragic. Its been a year.
    https://twitter.com/JMN/status/946059833945612288

  • Scout
    • Treant

      He looks annoyed, worked up, and somewhat worried.

      Good. Hopefully he’ll stress-eat.

      • Jonathan Smith

        Hopefully He will stress stroke-out

      • kanehau

        That’s cause he was one over par.

  • Dan M

    So, I can go with a slow battery or switch to an exploding Android phone?

    • safari

      Just wait until your options in 2025

    • danolgb

      Actually, you can replace your battery and it gets speedy again. I just did mine right before this news came out.

  • Do Something Nice

    ‘Smooth out’ = market strategy to make obsolete a product to sell a new version of that product.

    If Comcast did something like this, we would probably see mobs of people attacking Comcast offices.

    But it’s Apple so it’s all cool.

    • safari

      But it really didn’t obsolete the product. I can say as a user of an older iPhone that was seemingly too old for this “fix”, my battery would just cut out with very little warning and very little use. The “slowing down” was just to make battery life on a charge last longer. If they had simply said “Your battery needs servicing. Performance will be impacted.” when the phone turned on, it’d have been a transparent means of doing so. Then everyone would be bitching about it months ago.

      • Do Something Nice

        But…they could have profited from replacing batteries – or licensing shops to do so.

        Sure, they make more money on selling new iPhones, but not everyone has the bucks for a new phone or relies upon the latest iPhone for hipster cachet.

        And people were bitching about this months ago. I don’t have an iPhone but as my FB feed is always ripe with angry/sad comments when there is an OS update, I know about each and every update.

      • kanehau

        Indeed. I just switched from my 6 to an X for the very reason that my 6 (which was quite old) battery just wasn’t lasting.

        I didn’t notice any ‘slowing up’ – but I did notice having to recharge it way more often.

        I do love the X though. Beautiful device.

  • Michael R

    I had a Lexmark printer that was programmed to stop working at 3000 copies .
    Verizon destroyed my DSL phone line ( by adding static ) then tricked me into FIOS calling it free ( free phone at same old rate , but no internet connection ) .
    I don’t know how companies get away with things like that .

    • safari

      The shareholders are the consumers. You are the product.

    • Do Something Nice

      Or when they sell a flawed product and say ‘oh well’. This happened to me with an HTC phone which became a paperweight, and I will probably never buy one of their products again.

      • John30013

        I really liked the HTC One. I had the M8 and then the M9, but in both cases the batteries started discharging very quickly after about a year. So I ditched HTC and am now very happy with my LG G6.

  • Mark_in_MN

    These suits are basically a shakedown of Apple and all its cash. There is no reason that Apple should be liable for this. It is kind of like suing a car manufacuterer for their system to detect and limit potential crashes by reducing power or breaking, claiming you deserve the right to drive your car into that wall at full power. It is another of the suits charging Apple with not creating a perfect device that is immune to the laws of physics.

  • ChrisMorley

    OT
    Even More Dutch Socialism

    Dutch councils vie to produce cannabis in bid to cut out criminals
    – Netherlands trial is designed to stop gangs from supplying cannabis-selling coffee shops

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/dec/27/dutch-councils-vie-to-participate-in-regulated-cannabis-project

  • Boreal

    I don’t have a problem with apple doing this to save the batteries…………………….if they had been upfront with their customers about it and provided disclosure and a warning that updating the operating system might adversely affect older batteries. Most of the people I know have given up their landlines and only use their mobile phones.

    • Sam_Handwich

      we still have a landline because it’s part of our bundle.

      it keeps me in touch with Susan from Cardholder Services

      • Boreal

        We have a pseudo land line with our old number on a voip system.

      • Boreal

        How is Susan btw?

      • Phillip in L.A.

        It’s a good idea to keep the landline, because when power is cut, they are still supposed to work. (E.g., in the event of an alien magnetic pulsewave attack, etc.)

        • John30013

          While it’s true that the phone line does carry enough power to run the phone itself (though it won’t power modern electronic landline phones that require a separate power supply), it’s not true that that power supply would survive something like an electromagnetic pulse attack).

    • safari

      I agree. Even on my macbook I have a “Service Battery” notification when I check how much charge is left.

  • Lazycrockett
    • Boreal

      We could be doing the same here with a Marshall plan for solar on every roof but then energy companies couldn’t get rich gouging us.

    • shellback

      But what about coal? I hear coal is all the rage?

      • Boreal

        I think you mean ‘Clean Coal™.’

        • JAKvirginia

          Not just for stockings anymore.

        • 2guysnamedjoe

          Coming soon: ‘Shit That Don’t Stink™.’

    • Jonathan Smith
    • m_lp_ql_m

      If only there were some way to hook that up to an old iPhone.

  • JAKvirginia

    O/T: Why We Are Doomed as a Nation

    Watching CNN. Story about severe weather events of 2017. Video showed people viewing the solar eclipse. Sigh

  • ChrisMorley

    OT

    Why do archive files on Britain’s colonial past keep going missing?

    – Around 1,000 files have disappeared while ‘on loan’ to the government. This sort of accident is happening too often for comfort

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/dec/27/archive-files-britain-colonial-past-government

    ‘Also in 2014, the government was accused of a cover-up after it said it could not release information about the CIA’s “extraordinary rendition” programme because the files had suffered “water damage” .’

    Don’t be getting any ideas now

  • Lazycrockett
  • Professor Barnhardt
    • Boreal

      He just apologized (PR apology) after much blowback from the public.

      • m_lp_ql_m

        “But… but… they’re stifling his freedom of speech!!”

    • Lumpy Gaga

      Go get in your noisy car and work it out at the track. Drunk.

    • Lumpy Gaga

      Saw the stills. Don’t want to see the full vid.

    • BobSF_94117

      Well, technically he’s right. That’s not a dress, that’s a gown.

  • Scout
  • Blake J Butler
  • PickyPecker

    OT: One of my favorite musicals, ‘Showboat’ opened today in 1927 at the Ziegfeld Theatre in NYC. The popular movie musical was released by MGM in 1951 (trailer clip here).
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6lbmPzjrQo

    • Joe in PA

      🎶Can’t help loving that man o’ mine… 🎶

      Did Ava Garnder really sing that? Was that her voice?

      And BTW, I think that is probably the gayest movie ever.

      • ClevelandJim

        Probably Marni Nixon–she dubbed everyone else!
        Actually it was Annette Warren’s vocals used in the film, altho Ava Gardner did record the songs, and her vocals were used on the soundtrack album…weird.

    • stevenj

      Not to be confused with the Ziegfeld on W 54th St that closed in 2016.
      Click on the photo button at the link below. Very unusual interior walls.

      http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/2251

    • Joe in PA

      Also O/T…I got 4 seed catalogs in the mail yesterday! Whoohoo!

      • PickyPecker

        Let me know if you need others. I can give you some good source names. Yes…..it’s that time of year!!

        • Joe in PA

          Thanks. Well, I know one to avoid: Gurney’s. The worst germination rate of any vendor I’ve ever used. I pitch the catalog as soon as I see it. LOL

          • PickyPecker

            There’s several out there just like that. Many are owned by the same seed-houses and just own the brand names.

      • Boreal

        They are coming in slews everyday now.

  • safari
    • shellback

      Yikes. If I got down like that I’d need help to get upright.

    • m_lp_ql_m

      Hey! I do those. Takes some practice.

  • m_lp_ql_m

    Next up: ISPs throttling bandwidth to prevent bank accounts that are “low on charge” from frying.

  • Blake J Butler

    So Kaepernick made the same insinuation as sarandon. ? both said two are the lesser of evils and not even vote in Kaepernick’s case.

    And FFS Vice, someone with a past is going to have discussion raised about them, however though the treatment of hillary last year was sexist because her primary contender never received the magnitude of scrutiny that she did, and especially her general election opponent who needed to have been investigated before he began to run.

    It also isn’t fair to blame her for the sins of her husband, and the conspiracy theorists bullshit that was pushed that people bought into because they simply hated her and wanted a reason even if it was lies.

    Kaepernick isn’t awful like sarandon, but it is disappointing because votes mattered, especially last year, and people threw it away and contributed to helping the hell that we are in.

    https://twitter.com/JesseRikart/status/946084167602851840

  • Frostbite

    Another day, another class action lawsuit against Apple.

  • Scout
  • Lazycrockett
    • Ninja0980

      He’s right in that we should be calling it climate change and not global warming.
      Otherwise you have idiots pointing to temps like the one we have this week and saying, see, no climate change!

  • Silver Badger

    So, Apple is being sued for doing the right thing to protect their customers. Only in America.

    • Treant

      It’s not the crime (or lack of one), it’s the cover-up. They slowed down devices without telling people.

      Also, we only have Apple’s claim that older phones would detonate with nuclear power if they weren’t slowed down. Frankly, I find the claim to be somewhat dubious, the reason we use lithium-ion batteries is their ability to output power at low temperatures and to their designed and stated amp limits even when older.

      • danolgb

        I bet you every other phone manufacturer is doing this. Lithium Ion batteries degrade and no manufacturer has any more special technology than another.

    • Max_1

      Had they said, “In order to avoid becoming the next Motorola… Apple is alerting all of it’s customers of potential danger and will be implementing processor reducing mechanisms to older models still on the market,”… Then the consumer would have been fully informed.

      But they were not.
      And the customer was not.
      And, some people bought older phones, not knowing of the reduction of processor power AS ADVERTISED, and therefore, APPLE must now face that decision…

    • Um, no.

      Apple is being sued for doing this without people’s permission and hiding the fact they were doing it, regardless whether the phones in question actually *needed* to be slowed to preserve battery performance.

      It’d be one thing to offer this feature thus: “Hey, if you have an older phone and it’s running out of charge too quickly nowadays, here’s an option YOU can choose to enable to make it last longer. Performance will be slowed, but your battery will last longer.”

      Apple wasn’t doing this out of the goodness of their hearts. They were doing it to convince people their old phones weren’t working right anymore and nudge folks toward buying new ones.

    • Dayglo

      Oh, the cult of Apple is very strong.

    • Silver Badger

      I stand corrected. Thank you all for showing me the error of my ways.

  • Scout
  • Lazycrockett
    • Tread

      Oh bullshit. It was just a mean-spirited hit piece for no other reason than to be cünts.

  • Max_1

    To avoid a lawsuit about batteries exploding… Apple decided to gamble on slowing down the processor of older models…

    So APPLE, how’s that lawsuit avoidance working out for your business model?

  • fiizok

    Glad I have an older Android phone with a battery that is easy to replace.

  • first world problems, sounds like to me. oh well, some lawyers are going to make a lot of money and that’s what matters here.

  • Not buying their explanation. Battery ‘frying’ more typically happens during charging, not when it’s low and the phone is about to shut down.

    The other problem is this “feature” was implemented for iPhone 6 through 7 regardless whether the battery was degraded in function, causing slower operation *even if you had a charger plugged in at the time.*

    They were just trying to sell newer phones. That’s it. And convincing people their old phones aren’t working right is well…rather like this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NCwBkNgPZFQ

    Their software update was the big robot coming out to fuck up people’s existing phones, regardless whether there was any battery issue.

    • Tempus Fuggit

      this “feature” was implemented for iPhone 6 through 7 regardless whether the battery was degraded in function, causing slower operation *even if you had a charger plugged in at the time.*

      Knew it! Got documentation for that? I’ve experienced it on my own phone, as I just got finished saying in this very thread.

      • Blake Paine

        They implemented the power manager change because 6s were crashing trying to operate at higher clock speeds requiring more power than the aged battery could deliver.

        And, of course, you are always operating on the battery, plugged in or not. The power manager makes its decisions based on the battery model and the number of full charge cycles it has had. A phone with an old battery will be treated the same, phone plugged in or not.

        • Tempus Fuggit

          LOL! It’s early yet; there’ll be plenty of time for credulity—whatever measure of it is due—after proper discovery and research has been done.

          • Blake Paine

            Well unless everyone is lying that’s more just saying we should wait for an answer you like.

            Oh well, have fun fitting your tinfoil hat.

  • TheManicMechanic

    But but but Apple can do no wrong, ever! At least this is what I hear paraphrased when I complain about some rare annoyance with various Android and Windows and Linux devices I have too many of. My quips when they end up at the “Genius” for the third time for the same thing gets me shade. I have Apple equipment, and while I generally find it all capable, reliable and mostly well designed, it is also expensive and too restrictive, stuck in its own sandbox. Apple did this to keep the phones running reliably for their users, but did so on the down low, and deserves the bad press and lawsuit. Perhaps Apple can get off of some of their offshored, tax-sheltered billions and instead replace the batteries. Ironically, iPhones are some of the easiest sealed phones to replace batteries, especially when using the Apple-designed proprietary fixtures to do it. They owe it to these users.

    • CharlestonDave

      I’ve pretty much been an Apple fanboy for decades now, but they lost a lot of the good will I had for them after years and tens of thousands of dollars of purchases when they wouldn’t repair a failure that was literally a week beyond warranty and had previous reports of intermittencies. Flagrantly irritating was that the service tech would only speak to me on the phone (I was at an Apple store) and refused to let me speak to a service manager. I needed my laptop, so I paid something like $400 for a new motherboard. Also irritating me is that Apple drops support for older machines after around 5 years. My main editing computer is 8 years old, works fine and is highly customized, but I have to find aftermarket service providers (there is only one in Charleston) when it has a hiccup. And they don’t seem to be serious about supporting professional photography. The next iMac STARTS at $4995 and goes up to over $13K. You can buy a Hyundai for that. Not going to happen.

      • Snarky

        iMacs start at $1299 for a 21″ with a 4K screen. The price you’re quoting is the iMac Pro, a vastly different machine in the same form factor.

        • Tread

          Right. Unless you plan on doing heavy video editing, the regular iMac will suit your needs.

          • i’m not sure there are that many people who need to do heavy video editing, and if so, well. is anyone surprised professional grade equipment costs more?

        • CharlestonDave

          I’ve never owned on iMac as I prefer the modular, more upgradeable approach with in the Mac Pro line. Unfortunately, when I spec out a Mac Pro with features comparable to what I have in my current but very old machine, I’m again pushing $5K. The announcement Thursday of the high-end very expensive iMac Pro did give a hint that they’re working on a “completely redesigned, next-generation Mac Pro architected for pro customers who need the highest performance, high-throughput system in a modular, upgradeable design, as well as a new high-end pro display.” So there might be something coming that would work for me. My current machine was able to edit 4K drone footage satisfactorily this spring, but since recent system updates they no longer play smoothly. That’s also the case with my Mac laptop. I’m primarily a stills photographer and my old machine is adequate for Photoshop editing of stills, but not being able to do something I could do six months ago is alarming.

      • TheManicMechanic

        Except in a couple cases where I bought refurbed business PCs for less than the copy of Windows they included would cost to use as very simple units in the garage, I build my own boxes to my often crazy specs. Last year I put together a very involved home theater PC that was both nearly silent and power sipping but doubled as a top-end gaming rig with more graphics and CPU power than a current Mac Pro, and it includes top of the line sound, very fast connectivity including Thunderbolt 3, 16TB of internal storage, with lots of potential for future hardware upgrades for less than half of what the Pro costs. The new iMac costs more, and can run with it by the time you’ve cracked the $10k barrier. While Apple still does make a high quality product, the value is not there, and keeps diminishing unless you are a shareholder in the company. Apple is slowly abandoning the hardcore creative pros that were their bread and butter and leaning more and more on iOS and their 30+ percent share that comes with every app you will ever need and install on those devices. Macs can run 3rd party software that Apple doesn’t profit from, and these days that sticks in their craw. Downplay the Macs, get everyone they can onto iPads, profit! Sad, because, at least a few years ago, I still held Apple in pretty high regard. These days, not so much.

        • CharlestonDave

          I (sadly) agree.

  • CharlestonDave

    In addition to my aforementioned computer issues with Macs, I got burned on my previous iPhone, which developed the dreaded “iPhone touch disease” a few months before I was eligible for a replacement phone. Touch disease is a touchscreen defect caused by failed solder joints in turn caused by Apple’s elimination of a stiffener that kept the phone from flexing and gradually cracking the internal solder joints. Apple Genius Bar techs claimed they’d never heard of it, even though those pesky class action lawsuits have uncovered internal Apple service bulletins. I had to pay $180 for an independent tech to get a two-year-old phone working well enough to trade it in to Verizon for my current iPhone 7. Unfortunately the class action lawsuits never came to my state.

    And don’t get me started on the far that Apple expects all its users to use their crappy iPhotos and iCloud to move photos between cellphone, desktop computer and tablet. And iBook to move pdfs around.

    And my 4K drone videos that worked just fine on my desktop and laptop machines this spring now don’t play smoothly on either…seems suspiciously like a motivate-new-purchases slowdown via toxic system updates.

  • Tempus Fuggit

    Good. I hope they lose substantially enough that class members receive considerably more than a $2.37 check in the mail. And I hope it is publicly exposed that this “oh, it only slows down if the battery’s old or cold” line is exposed for the bulk wrap it is. My phone, a 6 with a battery that tests at 96% of new capacity, slowed down considerably with the all-but-forced “upgrade” from iOS 10 to 11, even when it is doing light-duty, low-demand tasks.

    • Blake Paine

      Since the guy who did the original discovery said that replacing the battery restored the speed sounds like it is exactly what apple says.

      And phones even with old batteries run normally with ‘light-duty, low-demand’ tasks. The power management only kicks in when the phone requests more power than a battery with that many recharge cycles can statistically deliver.

      Again their only error was not telling the customer their phone must run slower due to a dying battery.

      • Tempus Fuggit

        Oh, well, gosh, gee, one guy doing one test; I guess that settles it. Not! Things have only just got under way; we’ll wait ‘n’ see what comes to light by and by.

        • Blake Paine

          Far more evidence than mere opinion, and it confirms what Apple said.

          And if you had waited there would have been no need to correct you.

  • Pip

    I refuse to buy a phone for $1500. They need to fix this and stop slowing the older phones down. This bs line about them needing to slow it to protect the battery just isn’t flying. Androids don’t do it.

    • Blake Paine

      Of course that doesn’t ‘fly’ they aren’t protecting the battery, they are insuring the phone doesn’t try to draw more amps than the battery can deliver.

      And we don’t know that other manufacturers high end phones with unreplacable batteries don’t do the same thing. A phone running with inadequate power would have a hardware crash no matter who makes it.

  • Bj Lincoln

    Glad I never waste money on any Apple products. They cost twice as much with less features and don’t seem to last as long. Why anyone would pay for any product that matches this is just nuts. NO phone is worth the amount charged. We are paying for programming except there hasn’t been any different programming worth the cost in many years. How many of you use all the little tweaks you are paying hundreds for? At this point, all I need is a dam phone. I do like playing games but I can take a book with me if I have to wait somewhere. Those who forked over a grand for a phone are morons who just paid for a picture of a half eaten apple on the back and not much else. You can get the same features for a lot less. If we all stop paying such inflated prices maybe the prices would come down to something reasonable. Stop supporting being ripped off!