Conchita Wurst & Ina Regen – Heast As Net [VIDEO]

This is GORGEOUS.

ESC Today reports:

Eurovision 2014 winner Conchita and dialect artist Ina Regen have interpreted Heast As Net (Don’t You Hear It), a song in Austrian dialect originally sung by popular folk musician Hubert von Goisern and his band Die Alpinkatzen.

Heast As Net is a bittersweet song, about time that passes by, leaving only memories. Transitoriness and the flow of life. Yet it also celebrates the beauty and diversity of life. Conchita and Ina both grew up in rural areas, in dialect-speaking families, and were happy to contribute to the tradition of folk music, including yodeling.

Below is the 1992 original as well as Conchita’s winning Eurovision song, which went on to top the charts across Europe, much to the furor of anti-gay haters, particularly in Russia.

(Tipped by JMG reader Jimbo)

  • BeaverTales

    What is Conchita’s preferred pronoun? I’ve never found out since Conchita won Eurovision.

    • gaycuckhubby

      Pretty sure it’s he/him. But I’d like to know for sure, too.

      • Yalma Cuder-Zicci

        It’s confusing. I found this:

        “On being confused with a trans woman, Wurst said “I am happy being a man in a dress.”
        She went on to say: “I’m strict about the difference. What I do is performance, it’s staged, it’s glamour – it’s not real life.”

        I gather real life : Tom Neuwirth/he, and in drag: Conchita/she.

        • gaycuckhubby

          Cool. I think RuPaul is similar.

      • Gretchen
    • perversatile

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uFCL_D_hOYM
      A. I always stay within the lines
      B. I proudly color outside the lines
      C. I tore the coloring book into strips
      and made a pinata filled with glitter
      & rigidly defined gender roles.
      D. I have no need for a stick or a blindfold.
      E. I should go to the gym more often

      • sfbob

        I hope there are no neighbors downstairs.

    • I remember an interviewer asking her this very question, and the answer was that it’s simple — Conchita takes the feminine pronoun, Tom the masculine.

      And I remember too thinking how the two personae are mirror images of each other — Tom blond and (usually) clean-shaven, Conchita bearded and dark.

  • That_Looks_Delicious

    Girl’s got pipes.

  • JoeMyGod

    When I was in the Canary Islands last month, one of the German-owned bars in the Yumbo Center had a shrine to Conchita over the bar. That bar played nothing but Eurovision video clips going back to the 60s.

    • David Walker

      Knowing your love for Eurovision music, that must have been like going to heaven without dying.

    • abbafan65

      Carola, Charlotte Perrelli, and Loreen. I’d never have left the bar.

    • C-seal

      That sounds amazing.

    • Bunter

      I had no idea Conchita could yodel, it makes her perfect.

  • Bomer

    Makes me wish I could remember the story of Rumpelstiltskin that my grandmother use to tell us when we were little. She heard it from her father and it was in the his local Swiss dialect. I can only remember a phrase here and there now.

  • teeveedub

    It’s nice to be reminded that beauty can still exist. Thank you, Joe.

    • Rolf

      This gave me goosebumps. So beautiful and moving.
      I’m sure if there had been subtitles there would also have been tears.

  • Slippy_World

    Thanks for this -very sad day here in “Baghdad by The Bay ” ….San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee passed away

    http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/San-Francisco-Mayor-Ed-Lee-dead-at-65-12423708.php

    • That_Looks_Delicious

      I saw that London Breed’s photo went up on the Wikipedia page for San Francisco mayor hours ago. Nothing against her, but… Dang! Wikipedia doesn’t even wait for the body to get cold.

  • JoeMyGod
    • Bj Lincoln

      Awesome!

  • JoeMyGod

    Ina Regen is at #5 on the Austrian pop charts today with this.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WH-_K3fjnJY

    • JoeMyGod

      “Wie A Kind” = “Like A Child”

      • narutomania

        Let me second kevway’s thanks, Joe. This musik is beautiful!!

    • BurningTongues

      It’s so nice to hear popular music in dialect. Usually only really corny folk-music bands make music in local dialects. When people sing in the language they actually use and think in, you can definitely tell the difference!

    • kevway

      Thank you SO much for introducing me to a new fav 😉

    • narutomania

      I found the words to the song, written in Austrian dialect. I have translated them into English. (As always, any helpful corrections are always appreciated.)

      „Wie a Kind“ / “Like a Child”
      (Musik & Text: Ina Regen & Florian Cojocaru)

      Wie fångt ma au? / [ How does one begin? ]
      Wie steht ma auf? / [ How does one stand up? ]
      Wie foit ma hin / [ How does one fall down … ]
      und macht si nix draus? / [ … and yet it doesn’t matter? ]
      Was deaf ma hoffm, wånn ma goa nix mehr waß? [ What can one hope, when one no longer knows anything at all? ]
      Wås bleibt nu offm am Ende vom Kras? / [ What is left open at the end of the circle? ]

      Warum? Woher? Wohi? / [ Why? From where? Where to? ]
      I fråg amoi in Wind [ I’ll ask the wind ]

      Kann I / [ Can I ]
      irgendwann wieda so sein wie a Kind / [ Ever again be like a child ]
      Kann I / [ Can I ]
      afoch nehma wås des Leb’m bringt / [ Ever take what life brings ]
      Is eh ois egal oder håt ois an Sinn? / [ Don’t you care or do you think of it? ]
      Wieso trau I mi ned so sei wie I bin? / [ Why don’t I trust myself to be like I am? ]
      Waun hoit ma fest? / [ When does one hold on? ]
      Waun låsst ma los? / [ When does one let go? ]
      Wie bleibt ma kloan / [ How does one stay small ]
      und wie wird ma groß? / [ and how does one grow big? ]

      Wie tiaf kånn ma foin wånn ma in Bod’n verliert / [ How deep (far) can one go when you lose ground]
      Wie schee is des Gfühl wånn ma’s fliag’n probiert / [ How strange is the feeling when one tries to fly? ]
      Warum? Woher? Wohi? / [ Why? From where? Where to? ]
      I fråg amoi in Wind / [ I’ll ask the wind ]

      Kann I / [ Can I ]
      irgendwann wieda so sein wie a Kind / [ Ever again be like a child ]
      Kann I / [ Can I ]
      afoch nehma wås des Leb’m bringt / [ Ever take what life brings ]
      Is eh ois egal oder håt ois an Sinn? / [ Don’t you care or do you think of it? ]
      Wieso trau I mi ned so sei wie I bin? / [ Why don’t I trust myself to be like I am? ]
      I steh vor’m Spiagl, schau mi ån, so lång, so lång / [ I stand in front of the mirror, look at myself, so long, so long ]
      Es wird da Wind zum Sturm und dann Anfång, Anfång, Anfång / [ The wind grows into a storm, and then beginning, beginning, beginning ]

      • sfbob

        It sounds very much like Yiddish to me.

      • narutomania

        And the High German transliteration:

        Wie A Kind (Deutsche Fassung)
        (Musik & Text: Ina Regen & Florian Cojocaru)

        Wie fängt man an?
        Wie steht man auf?
        Wie fällt man hin
        Und macht sich nichts draus?

        Was darf man hoffen, wenn man gar nichts mehr weiß?
        Was bleibt noch offen, am Ende vom Kreis?

        Warum? Woher? Wohin?
        Ich frag einmal den Wind

        Kann ich
        Irgendwann wieder so sein wie ein Kind?
        Kann ich
        Einfach nehmen, was das Leben bringt?
        Ist alles egal oder hat’s einen Sinn?
        Wieso trau ich mich nicht so sein wie ich bin?

        Wann hält man fest?
        Wann lässt man los?
        Wie bleibt man klein?
        Und wie wird man groß?

        Wie tief kann man fallen, wenn man den Boden verliert?
        Wie schön ist das Gefühl, wenn man zu fliegen probiert?

        Warum? Woher? Wohin?
        Ich frag einmal den Wind

        Kann ich
        Irgendwann wieder so sein wie ein Kind?
        Kann ich
        Einfach nehmen, was das Leben bringt?
        Ist alles egal oder hat’s einen Sinn?
        Wieso trau ich mich nicht so sein wie ich bin?

        Ich steh vor’m Spiegel, schau mich an, so lang’,
        Es wird der Wird zum Sturm und dann, Anfang, Anfang, Anfang

  • clay

    I like her head wraps.

  • PickyPecker

    OT: npr-environment ~ Macron Awards U.S. Climate Scientists Grants To ‘Make Our Planet Great Again’

    https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/12/11/570036260/macron-awards-u-s-climate-scientists-grants-to-make-our-planet-great-again

  • Mikey

    I’m not usually a great fan of pop music, but this was quite beautiful.

  • Jacob

    Gorgeous

  • worstcultever

    fab

  • Silver Badger

    Hubert von Goisern looks like he could be a lot of fun, himself.

  • Ian

    My god, my grandparent and school-taught Hoch Deutsch is no match for this song. I can’t understand a damn thing.

    • JoeMyGod

      I could only pick out a few words like “gestern” (yesterday).

    • BurningTongues

      Here’s my translation:
      Don’t you hear it, how time passes? *pretty yodel words that don’t mean anything* Only yesterday, people spoke so differently, *pretty yodel words that don’t mean anything*, The young ones have grown old, and the old ones have died. *pretty yodel words that don’t mean anything* And yesterday has become today, and today will soon be tomorrow. *pretty yodel words that don’t mean anything* Don’t you hear it? Don’t you hear how time passes? *pretty yodel words that don’t mean anything*

      • lymis

        Beautiful. Thanks.

      • Ian

        Thanks for the translation! I’m curious about the dialect more than anything. I’m familiar with Bavarian accents and some Swabish, but Austrian and Swiss German is really hard. I guess heast as nest is supposed to be hoerst das nicht.

        • BurningTongues

          That’s right. In many of the southern German dialects, you can drop the word du when asking questions as it sort of gets absorbed into the verb itself since the second person verb ending is t/d , so for example: Did you see him?- Hast du ihn gesehen? = Haschd ih’ g’seha’? You can add the pronoun for emphasis, Hasch DU ih’ g’seha?, but that question is asking if you are the person that saw him, and not IF you saw him like the previous one. There’s a real effort in the South to keep the dialects intact and to dispel the idea that you have to speak High German in all settings to be deemed intelligent. Heck, the state motto for Baden-Württemberg is “Wir können alles. Außer Hochdeutsch’ (We can do anything. Except speak High German.)

  • narutomania

    For anyone interested in such linguistic things, the phrase “Heast as net?” does indeed translate as “Don’t you hear it?” It transliterates back into High German as “Hörst Du’s nicht?”

    heast = hörst (Du) = do you hear
    as = das / es = that / it
    net = nicht

    The Austrian dialects, and those of Bavaria (southern Germany), are a lot of fun! I have met so many people over the years who say that they don’t like German because it sounds too harsh (to their ears). I just smile and say, “You need to hear some dialect.” It would change your perspective. Like the Austrian dialect(s), or perhaps the Fraenkish dialect from around Nürnberg, or the country dialects from around Oberammergau.

    I had the good fortune of having had a tutor in high school who had lived and studied in Austria, so she taught me much of the local dialect that she had learned. Then I lived in Nürnberg (Bavaria) myself for a spell.

    • JoeMyGod

      My high school German teacher (Frau Erna Grosser) constantly battled the students with Bavarian parents for slipping out of “Hoch Deutsch” in class. They were only in the class for an easy A, anyway.

    • David Walker

      You would probably find Amish Dutch amusing. From Wikipedia:

      “Pennsylvania Dutch is a variety of West Central German spoken by the Old Order Amish, Old Order Mennonites and other descendants of German immigrants in the United States and Canada, closely related to the Palatine dialects. There are possibly more than 300,000 native speakers in Pennsylvania, and 29.9% currently claim to have German ancestry.

      “It has traditionally been the dialect of the Pennsylvania Dutch, descendants of late 17th- and early 18th-century immigrants to Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina from southern Germany, eastern France (Alsace and Lorraine), and Switzerland.”

      • narutomania

        Thank you, David Walker! I will definitely look into what it sounds / looks like.

        • David Walker

          There are publications for Amish, so you could probably get an idea from them.

    • Dean

      I hob nur n bissel Bairisch gelernt. I lived in Munich for nearly seven years. I was even actually starting to understand some Schweizerdeutsch when I left. Bin jetzt in Berlin und das ist ook jut so.

      • narutomania

        (lach!) I love your rendition of Berlinerisch! My colleague who teaches German where I teach Spanish (at a little uni here in the U.S. south) is also from Berlin. But she tends to stay away from her native dialekt. I may have to coax her into sharing it with me over a cup of coffee and maybe some Schnapps.

        When I hear someone speaking Swützerdütsch, I recognize it right away. And I can pick out about one word every ten words. It almost sounds like Swedish or Norwegian to me at times.

        But I get along quite well with the various Buarische Dialekte. To my ear, it’s the linguistic equivalent of taking off your shoes and walking around in the mud. It feels so good.

        • BurningTongues

          I speak Schwäbisch, which is somewhere between (both figuratively and literally) Bayerisch and Schwiizertüütsch, which lets me understand them both a little better than the average German speaker. People love to make fun of Schwäbisch, but it’s really quite charming and sweet when you get to know it well.

        • Dean

          How could I not upvote that description? I was still living in New York and knew very little German when I visited Bern. Everyone sounded like Miss Lothmar from Charlie Brown!

    • romanhans

      Hubby’s best friend is Bavarian and he admits he doesn’t understand half of what the guy says. I thought the American South had accents but here in Bavaria you can allegedly recognize differences five miles apart.

      Anyway, saw Conchita last month at the Berlin Phil (along with every gay man in Germany). Wonderful. Wish she’d sung this.

      • sfbob

        New York City has accents that vary by neighborhood too. Or at any rate by borough.

        • BurningTongues

          Yeah, you can definitely tell Brooklyn vs Queens vs Long Island, though the differences are slowly disappearing, unfortunately.

          • sfbob

            I leave and the place goes to hell. Sheesh!

    • sfbob

      It took me a couple of minutes to figure that out myself.

      I brought it around as “Hörst es nicht?”

      I studied German (a long, long time ago) but of course I learned no dialect at all. Other than what was idiomatic throughout West Germany in the early to mid 60s.

  • barrykyle415

    You’re right. It is gorgeous. Thank you for posting it.

  • Ningsisa

    Ich habe Deutsch gelernt und verstehe ich kein Wort. Österreichisch!!!

    • GanymedeRenard

      Deshalb wird es Dialekt genannt. 🙂

  • band

    A welcome show of solidarity with lonely goatherds everywhere.

  • GanymedeRenard

    Gorgeous indeed! Thanks, Joe! And Conchita looks fabulous in that attire!

  • ColdCountry

    Lovely, thanks.

  • narutomania

    I found this blurb about Ina on the interwebs (German first, then English):

    Die Oberösterreicherin Ina Regen veröffentlichte vor wenigen Tagen die Single “Wie a Kind”. Nun möchte die Newcomerin voll durchstarten. Für das Jahr 2016 hat die junge Sängerin bereits die Veröffentlichung eines ganzen Albums angekündigt.

    Ina Regen war bereits als Background-Sängerin für zahlreiche namenhafte Stars tätig. Doch nun möchte die Österreicherin an ihrer Solo-Karriere arbeiten. Ein Herbstspaziergang durch den Schönbrunner Schlosspark diente ihr als Inspiration für den Songtext zu “Wie a Kind”.

    The Austrian Ina Regen published the single “Wie a Kind” a few days ago. Now the newcomer really wants to get started. For 2016 (I think they meant ‘2018’), the young singer has already announced the release of an entire album.

    Ina Regen has already worked as a background singer for numerous well-known stars. But now the Austrian wants to work on her solo career. An autumn walk through the Schönbrunner Castle park served as inspiration for the lyrics to “Wie a Kind” (“Like A Child”).

  • JCF

    Sigh. When Conchita won Eurovision. The world seemed so, well, bright & gay then… 🙁

    • JCF

      The song is perfectly lovely.

  • Dean

    Some people are calling Alina “the German Adele”. See what you think.
    https://youtu.be/ak0BdMsIRhA

  • C-seal

    As a massive Conchita fan, and a fan of Joe My God, I have to say I am thrilled to see this here. Thank you, thank you, thank you!

  • C-seal

    Also, Hubert von Goisern not only loved the cover, but posted a picture of himself during his wild 80s wearing a full face of makeup in solidarity. He’d have made a great queen! Now, that’s the kind of person you want having your back.

  • Marianne Nygaard

    If you want to know more about Conchita why don’t you join her Europe Fan Page on Facebook “Fans Conchita Wurst” We try to translate as much as possible into English. Do you know she gave a sold out concert in Sydney Opera House with the Sydney Symphony orchestra last year? The concert was called “From Vienna with love”.

  • Petra Winner

    Unbelievable! Great voices!!!