LIVE VIDEO: Trump Declares Opioid Emergency

The New York Times reports:

President Trump on Thursday will announce he is directing his Department of Health and Human Services to declare the opioid crisis a public health emergency, senior administration officials said, taking long-anticipated action to address a rapidly escalating epidemic of drug use in the United States.

The move falls short of Mr. Trump’s sweeping promise to declare a national emergency on opioids, which would have triggered the rapid allocation of federal funding to address the issue, and does not on its own release any money to deal with the drug abuse that claimed more than 59,000 lives in 2016.

But it would allow some grant money to be used for a broad array of efforts to combat opioid abuse, and would ease certain laws and regulations to address it.

Mr. Trump’s directive, to be announced in an address at the White House on Thursday afternoon before he signs a presidential memorandum on opioids, would fulfill a vow that he made when he assumed office to make tackling opioid abuse one of his top priorities. But he has so far taken limited action to carry that out.

  • Chrissy

    Run Rush Limbaugh Run — he’s onto you

  • justme

    But if I declare it a true emergency…Profits by my cronies will be lost!!!

  • Adam Stevens

    I declare a Trump Emergency.

  • Lumpy Gaga

    They’re even block-granting opioid abuse money and loosening regs on it.

    Here come faith-based solutions!

    • Gustav2

      There is no money to fund the block grants.

      • Lumpy Gaga

        Loosen restrictive regulatin’ rules first! Then the money for the snake-handlers!

        — Red Queen

      • They’ll take it from other programs.

        • Like, for example, after school programs, programs to prevent teen pregnancy, library grants, job training programs—y’know, stuff that helps people.

          • Gustav2

            Helps “those” people.

          • Lumpy Gaga

            It doesn’t help them. It only keeps them in bondage.

            Freedom is slavery.

          • Tawreos

            Too bad they won’t take it from the one place the amount needed won’t be missed, but we wouldn’t want to come up one missile short would we?

    • Dagoril

      I’m praying about it right now. Send me my millions!!

    • The_Wretched

      That’s why I don’t want Donny the Unfit to take any actions. Forcing people into religion does not stop the social harms of the addictive behavior and has no history of success in reducing death rates. It’s just another excuse to send tax dollars to religious zombies.

  • bkmn

    Anyone know how much money Purdue Pharma has given him?

  • Gustav2

    BFD. There is no money in the health emergency fund and it is not in the Republican Budget. It has all the import of an EO about the rain.

    • kareemachan

      Who’ll Stop the Rain?
      Kiss the Rain
      etc

  • JayRock

    Nice try on the distraction. No dice

  • In other words, another empty gesture from Putin’s Potemkin Puppet President.

    Look for all of the grant money to end up being handed over to states who’ll either use it to plug holes in their general budgets and/or directed to Christian ‘pray the addiction away’ religious groups.

    • Tiger Quinn

      They’ll toss them into for profit prisons to dry out or die, then stick the state with the bill and call it a treatment program.

    • zhera

      Or perhaps more funding to more prisons to lock up all those undesirables. Private prisons, obviously!

  • Tawreos

    Someone finally told him that white people were dying in this epidemic

    • Jonathan Smith

      not “white people” per say………..
      his voters.

  • Jonathan Smith
  • dagobarbz, fine Italian shoes

    And the Keebler Elf just came out with genius idea!

    Just say no! Yeah, that worked out real effectively when Nancy Reagan said it.

  • Boreal

    Acting Secretary of Health and Human Services. Soon to be replaced by a new HHS secretary who will then resign or be fired and be replaced by another acting secretary of HHS, who will then……………………………………………………….

  • Boreal

    Funded by slashing medicare and medicaid, at least what’s left of it after tax cuts for the 1%.

  • Henry Auvil

    Get this son of a bitch out of the White House.

  • Paula

    I am in favor of Opioids being freely available to residents of states of the former Confederacy. /s better add that.

    • Jonathan Smith

      they ARE. no /s.

      • clay

        WV and OH were not in the Confederacy.

        • Tawreos

          You wouldn’t know that if you drove through a few neighborhoods in northeast Ohio

          • clay

            or PA, or KS, or WY, . . .

    • Lumpy Gaga

      Why the /s?

      Let ’em off themselves in a stupor.

      • GayOldLady

        Now wait a minute, some of us JMG’ers live in Dixie.

        • Paula

          You know better. You were raised right.

          • Tawreos

            I thought being raised right meant that someone hadn’t left the house without lycra on their thighs since they were 14.

        • Tomcat

          And you call that living?

          • GayOldLady

            Somebody had to stay and fight for civil rights.

    • Tomcat

      They pretty much are.

    • pch1013

      I’m in favor of the entire supply of opioid pills being given away free to all Republican NRA life members. Let’s solve two problems at once.

  • Rex

    He’s the reason more people are abusing drugs.

    • He’s the reason my liver has been begging for mercy.

      • Jeffrey

        I’m smoking pot like I was back in college now, for sure.

        • clay

          I’ve stopped wearing suits. People at work are remarking that they’ve never seen me in just jeans and T-shirt, and could I please put on some shoes?

          • Jeffrey

            Coworkers have remarked, “please Mr Vandenberg, put your pants back on.”

        • clay

          It was a major topic at Trae Crowder’s show last night.

          • Joe in PA

            You got to see him? Was he as good as his vids?

          • clay

            One of the slots for the sold-out show opened at the last minute. The longer set meant he was as energetic, but the humor was good. Had two of his buddies with him so three sets, and then they all sat down to talk amongst themselves about how the tour was going, now, after the election.

            Some paid more for an extended Q & A with photos.

      • The_Wretched

        I guess I should be happy that my psychology is only marginally disturbed by the current lack of sanity. It might be a different story though were I blocked from the gym and floggers.

        • Jeffg166

          I just did my mini workout to get my endorphin fix.

    • FAEN

      And alcohol. And stress eating.

      • Daveed_WOW

        My last drink was on election night. Nothing worse than a celebration that turns into the worst night of your life.

        Not exactly committed to sobriety, but it looked like a good idea in November and I’ve been staying the course.

    • TrueWords

      The real crisis is the existence of tens of millions of desperate and unhappy people living in this country and seek relief in opioid use.

      Unless we help these people and others to have better lives the crisis will continue.

      • Phillip in L.A.

        Very well said, True Words!

        Billie Holiday–“All of Me’

        https://youtu.be/4P0hG3sD0-E

        • vorpal 😼

          More good taste in music from you!

          • Phillip in L.A.

            Thank you, but that’s about *all* I have left today, hermanito

      • vorpal 😼

        As someone who has struggled with opioid dependency (legitimate) and addiction in the past, it’s a difficult situation and a fine line between dependency and addiction.

        When you’re feeling profound levels of pain – physical or emotional – opioids deliver relief like nothing else.

        Unfortunately, crackdowns on opioid prescriptions are simply going to increase the black market and research chemical opioid use like the dangerous fentanyl analogues, and keep opioids out of the hands of the people who need them the most.

        • clay

          Meanwhile, Pharma just can’t be bothered to reformulate them into non-crushable forms– to prevent them from going from controlled release to sudden hits.

          • Tiger Quinn

            Yeah, it’s almost like they WANT you to be addicted for some reason.

          • clay

            AND they want their pills to able to be easily turned into street drugs.

          • vorpal 😼

            LOL it’s like dextromethorphan (DXM), which is the active ingredient in almost all over-the-counter cough medications and is, at dozens of times the medical dosage, an extremely potent dissociative anaesthetic like ketamine.

            There have been no significant moves made to control it in the US because the pharma companies know where their DXM sales profits come in: not from the family who buys one bottle a year, if that, but from the dexheads who go through several bottles a week.

          • Phillip in L.A.

            Also, the levo-rotary isomer of DXM is levorphanol, which is more potent than even Dilaudid

          • vorpal 😼

            LOL we had this discussion. Slight technical point:
            Racemethorphan = dextromethorphan + levomethorphan
            Racemorphan = dextrorphan + levorphanol

            Dextrorphan is the primary metabolite (for most people with functioning CYP450-2D6 liver enzymes) of dextromethorphan. No idea if the same metabolic relationship exists between levomethorphan and levorphanol. (Actually, just checked, and yes, it is a prodrug.)

            Regardless, both levomethorphan AND levorphanol are powerful opioids. Assuming that they’re created in equal measure during synthesis (which may be wrong), I wonder what they do with them all?

            Levomethorphan sounds fascinating, as it’s got activity at all three families of opioid receptors, and is also an NMDA antagonist (like DXM), and also an SNRI. Talk about an active little bastard of a molecule!

          • Phillip in L.A.

            Yes, I remember the discussion; it might be an issue of terminology, although it looks like my Doc was wrong and you were right! (I took it for several months around 2000).
            https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/4da0417cf11625557f1418e74aba9c8cbd19130d6439807aa733b843ba6c2847.gif

            [Edit: Not familiar with the industrial synthesis of levorphanol (if it is still even manufactured); perhaps this molecule is actually levomethorphan? This is above my pay-grade!]

          • vorpal 😼

            “you were right!”

            I hear that so seldom that I am tempted to blow it up to 1000 point font, print it out, and paste it on the ceiling above my bed!

            =consults tattoo=
            That is levorphanol. Levomethorphan has, as the name suggests, a methoxy group on the benzene ring, whereas levorphanol has a hydroxyl group instead.

            The inclusion of unnecessary methyl groups and carbon atoms instead of just bare sticks always irks me.

          • Phillip in L.A.

            You may blow it up as large as you like, tattoo it on your forehead, or hire a sky-writer! 🙂

            The question then becomes, why did the pharmaceutical company decide to market the metabolite, instead of the pro-drug? (Probably cost, difficulty of synthesis, etc. Who the fuck knows?!)

          • vorpal 😼

            It’s difficult to find a formulation that is completely immune from abuse.

            There IS a new promising candidate for an opioid that appears to be a potent analgesic that is not addictive or tolerance building and does not cause euphoria, namely BU08028, which is related to buprenorphine.

            https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3061529

          • ZhyKitty

            Yeah but, they already wont prescribe enough to make life tolerable for people living with painful conditions/diseases.
            When you’re on minimal doses of medicine, sometimes, by the time you can take more, you’re in agony…and time release meds won’t make that stop. Chewing up and or crushing and snorting the medication helps get it into the bloodstream faster and brings relief. It’s not right to judge people who are living in pain and undermedicated for occasionally crushing up their medicine out of desperation.

          • vorpal 😼

            Agreed. I readily admit that I used to smash up my Hydromorph Contin and OxyContin because there were times that I needed a much stronger dose and the minimal “breakthrough” doses they give you just aren’t going to come anywhere near putting a dent in a sudden 9-10 on the pain scale.

          • ZhyKitty

            That’s me, too.
            I’m generally okay, but if for some reason (like a flare up) that I’m not, I’d literally do just about anything to make the pain stop. People who don’t live with chronic pain don’t realize what it’s like to suffer all day and all night and NEVER be pain free. It’s always about how much pain I’m in, not if there is none at all… I wish…
            I freely admit to chewing up my meds and drinking hot coffee behind them when I’m in agony and I’ve told my doctor that I think I need something stronger than the oxycodone I’m on, but the doctors are scared to prescribe what people need anymore, and I don’t blame them….it’s their license on the line, after all.

          • vorpal 😼

            So agree with this. From 2007 – 2010, I don’t think I had a single day where I could say that I was pain-free. There were days where I was at a tolerable 3-5, but then there were moments where suddenly my pain would jump up to a 9-10 where I couldn’t even scream because it was just so intense that I was nearly blacking out. Those were the days where I’d grind up those little beads of Hydromorph Contin and take 30 mg all at once, and that would bring some relief and let me make it through one more day without trying to euthanize myself.

            So hard to get good pain management. Here in Chile, it’s almost impossible. It’s either tramadol – which completely sucks for me (as I am deficient in the liver enzyme that metabolizes it into its active form, o-desmethyltramadol) – or buprenorphine patches. I switched to the patch six weeks ago and while it doesn’t do much on the rare instances of breakthrough pain, I’ve found I’ve barely had that since starting it, so it seems to be doing something right.

          • ZhyKitty

            Oh, that sounds like a dream…a patch that works all the time that’s actually helping you!
            (Tramadol sucks. I’d off myself if I had to live with that for pain control. I get oxycodone and toradol,)
            I’ve got a friend on the fentanyl patch, but she has to go to pain management to get it, and I don’t want anything to do with pain management here, it’s an absolute nightmare.

          • Phillip in L.A.

            Interesting–I never actually had to do that; I guess I should feel thankful!

          • vorpal 😼

            In my case, it was due to so much scar tissue forming in my intestines that there was less thickness than a pencil at certain points for food to traverse. I would be on the bed writhing in agony, drenched with sweat, having hot flashes, and my blood pressure through the roof, as the husband had to massage hard lumps through my abdomen.

            I think I have as close to an understanding of the pain of childbirth that a biological male can probably experience.

            After that, I was exhausted and with so much residual pain that I would have done anything for some relief.

          • clay

            I’m not judging the people who use these drugs. I’m judging the people who design them, and the people who refuse to examine why there were pockets of high demand, high maintenance, and high availability in the first place.

          • Snarkaholic

            Is there a central database of who’s prescribed what…or could a person go to five different doctors/pharmacies and get 5x as much?

        • ZhyKitty

          RAmen!!!! RAmen!!!! Preach it Vorpie!!!!

      • netxtown

        I lost my youngest brother to drugs. He started when he was 15-16. Even then, it was evident he was dissatisfied with “self”. He didn’t do well in school. In fact, at one point, they just asked him not to come back.

        The years go by – and his addiction advanced to weekend binges away from home to hide it from his kids. Of course, the kids grew up and moved out, and the binges got longer. Then when the dealers started popping in for payment in the middle of the night, the wife moved out.

        He cashed out the equity in his house and tore through $40k in 6 months. He kept a loaded shotgun behind his front door. And then he was dead. Murdered by 2 crack whores who thought he had more party money. Now, they are both in prison. Three lives ruined.

        Sometimes he would call me – and just go off on why our Dad didn’t force him to stay in school. He couldn’t get promoted because all he had was a GED he got 10 years after high school. And he would say he was tired: tired of having to fight for every thing, and fight to not get screwed. And yet – he never once would enroll in even a remedial course at the community college.

        I wish there was a clear cut answer to help these folks. I do feel education is a part of it – but then, there are plenty of educated addicts. It just seems that what has been done and is being done just ain’t working.

        • Phillip in L.A.

          Thank you for telling your story, netxtown–that is devastating that you lost your brother like that–so sorry that happened to you (or anyone, really)

    • Phillip in L.A.

      It is INCONCEIVABLE to me that no policy- or law-maker has ever thought to ask WHY America has an “opioid problem”….

      • ZhyKitty

        RAmen!

        What we have, at least locally, is a massive heroin problem, and the reason we have it is because people in legit. pain can’t get or have been cut off from accessing pain medication.
        They’re left with nowhere else to turn…
        Buying pills on the street is expensive as hell, while heroin is more affordable…unless you count the whole life ruining addiction part..

        What we NEED is to make sure that those who NEED pain meds can get them, and can get them in amounts which are great enough to manage their pain, not more rules making life an absolute misery for people with debilitating pain.

        • Phillip in L.A.

          WHY are so many folks in so much pain? WHY do so many folks feel compelled to ingest intoxicants, of any kind? (Not the same question.)

          This is what I AM talking about. Not saying anything about making more rules, so I agree with you absolutely on that, and I agree that folks in legitimate pain need to have access to those meds!

          • vorpal 😼

            I think many of us are bored and dissatisfied, either with our lives, the world, or both.

            Also, humans aren’t really living in the way that we evolved to live most harmoniously: in small tribes where we were valued and cared for by our fellow tribe members. Living in large cities can be quite isolating and overwhelming.

            Just my $0.02 = 12.71 CLP.

          • Phillip in L.A.

            That explanation is as good as any! There are some fascinating . . . books [never mind!] . . . on the subject, including, e.g., Ronald K. Siegel, Intoxication: Life in Pursuit of Artificial Paradise (New York: E.P. Dutton, 1st ed. 1989).

          • vorpal 😼

            LOL you know me too well. =evil grins=

          • Mark_in_MN

            And people living in large cities used to know their neighbors, interact with them (even if it wasn’t a particularly close knit community) and their neighborhood. That is a lot more rare now.

        • vorpal 😼

          Given how hard it is to get good pain meds, a nurse friend of mine recommended I score some heroin, and take some so that I would test positive for heroin abuse, and then go to a methadone maintenance clinic and get on methadone.

          You often have to do a couple pee tests to get approved to go on methadone, and if you’re not legitimately addicted to heroin or other opioids, will have to make up a backstory, but if you’re determined, you can get in.

          And methadone maintenance doctors are usually MUCH more lenient about allowing dosage modification than other opioid prescribing doctors. Also, when you get take-home doses, you can take far less (or none, if you’re not dependent) on days you don’t need it, and more on days that you do.

          I was on methadone for four years to get off the massive doses of hydromorphone I needed before getting major surgery, and it was really a great drug. Glad to be off of it now, as I tapered slowly and discontinued, but I still have dreams of going to the methadone clinics to pick up my weeks’ worth of bottles.

          • ZhyKitty

            I’ve considered methadone, but I figure…I’m not really there yet. I’m saving it for when I do need to go there.

          • vorpal 😼

            Just know that it’s cheap, long-lasting, and quite effective, and like I said, it’s nice to be able to adjust your dosage without so much scrutiny.

            The downside, of course, is that you have to deal with methadone clinics, which usually involve going daily for the first few months, which is a big hassle if you’re in chronic pain, and you have to deal with humiliating things like observed pee-tests to make sure you’re being “compliant” with your methadone usage and not selling it and not abusing other drugs you’re not prescribed.

          • Phillip in L.A.

            It is cheap, effective, and long-lasting, agreed! (However, iirc the “therapeutic window” is smaller with methadone, which means it’s thus easier to OD on methadone; see, e.g., Anna Nicole Smith [poly-drug, iirc, too]).

          • vorpal 😼

            Did not know that ANS ODed in part on methadone!
            Methadone can also make one VERY drowsy.
            I had to be extremely careful driving when on methadone because there were a few times I nodded out / fell asleep at the wheel for a couple moments. Very scary. I learned quickly to be extremely cautious and when I could and could not drive after taking it.

          • Phillip in L.A.

            Oh, yes, methadone works really well for pain! Any doctor can prescribe methadone for PAIN; a methadone “clinic” is only necessary if it’s being prescribed for “maintenance.” (In the US, that is; this is a complex area of the law that is almost-entirely regulated by federal statute.)

          • vorpal 😼

            Why are the notifications of these comments coming in so late? I still haven’t gotten one for your “Mexican Work Week” video and just had to stumble upon that comment!

            You are right that methadone is prescribed for pain, but usually in much lower doses than for MMT. I don’t even know for certain if it’s prescribed for pain in Canada. I’ve never heard of it being as such. I wasn’t thinking with my American brain. (My nurse friend situation was in Canada, where the wait time for pain management clinics was so long.)

            There seems to be a lot of flexibility in MMT vis-a-vis dosing; I’m not sure that flexibility would exist in methadone for pain mgmt.

            I still find pain mgmt meds to be very oddly prescribed. For example, meperidine / Demerol was for a long time widely used, but then fell out of favour because it would induce seizures. Tramadol is now in favour in many places, but it, too, induces seizures… so… why?

            Speaking of funny coincidences, I dug through my crap bumming around t-shirt drawer to grab a random t-shirt to go to bed in, and… it turned out to be my methadone molecule t-shirt! (I also have DXM and alprazolam / Xanax molecule t-shirts. I will soon have PCP and U-47700 molecule t-shirts, and my swimming bag has the structure of deschloroketamine on it!)

    • Uncle Mark

      I’m sure it’s the only way Melancholy can stand being married to him.

    • Lars Littlefield

      True. I’ve been thinking about it myself.

  • PickyPoussin
  • Do Something Nice

    FYI, there are now more deaths from opioids in the US in 2016 than there were AIDS deaths in any given year.

    • Jonathan Smith

      let’s put them on a small island and keep them away from real people……
      i meant dRump voters………

      • I haven’t heard from or about my brother in about 8 weeks now. There’s a good chance he’s dead.

        He’s a real person, even if he’s a horrid shit who I wish was somewhere he could get treatment.

        • Jonathan Smith

          i am sorry for making light of that.
          i hope things work out.

          • It’s okay. Just this opioid stuff kinda hits home, y’know? He was already spiraling badly and stealing to support his habit. Then when my mom died in April and his means to keep stealing from her while living with her ended, the downward spiral began.

            Last I’d heard, he’d fled to avoid an arrest warrant from the job he was fired from…for stealing from them.

          • Gustav2

            Both my family and the hubby’s family have been spared, which is amazing since my family lives in exurban and his family lives in rural Ohio.

          • Here’s the other thing, speaking in a general sense: Voting is probably the last thing on the minds of those addicted to opioids.

            Hence what the Trump administration is doing today isn’t something I can totally object to, but I also recognize they probably won’t do anything to actually help people. Personally, I figure they’ll use this as an excuse to go after MJ users and to make people suffering chronic pain suffer even more due to inability to access legal ‘scrips.

          • yes b’y
        • Do Something Nice

          Oh no. I’m so sorry Becca. Take care.

  • Tawreos

    Did he hold up his prescription bottle like H. W. Bush held up crack rocks?

  • yes b’y

    God she sounds like ting tong macadangdang

  • FAEN

    The BEST opioid emergency ever! All the top opioid people are saying so.

  • Bluto

    deport her.

  • another_steve

    The pharmaceutical industry is making a fortune off of opioid addiction, just like the tobacco industry is making a fortune off of cigarette addiction.

    The Republican Party is a puppet of both industries. Real action under Republican leadership will never happen.

    • The way they formulated the pills both increased their profits AND greatly increased the chances for addiction, and much of it comes down to dosing.

      Pharma wants to sell a pill they say works for 12 hours. What happens is there’s a massive early onset of pain relief (and euphoria) for the 1st hour or two. Then it goes down. If the pain being treated is severe, within 6-8 hours the patient is already feeling pain again and within 10-12, they REALLY want that next dose. The normal human brain’s pleasure-pain response quickly becomes conditioned, the body itself develops physical dependency and there’s the root of the addiction.

      If the bastards just sold 4 hour pills at much lower doses, people would be far less likely to become addicted because both the euphoria and the pain would be far less.

      What hospitals learned long ago? They were giving too much morphine and patients were leaving with nascent addictions. So they began doing on-demand, letting patients dose themselves when they felt discomfort. What happened? Morphine use went way down, as did post-operative opioid addictions.

      • another_steve

        Great analysis, Becca. Thanks.

        Treating physicians share the blame. Just as with the over-prescribing of antibiotics – in many cases simply to placate patients and get them out of the doctors’ offices – some doctors are all too happy to prescribe addictive painkillers to patients who ask for them.

        Gets those patients out the door too.

        • vorpal 😼

          =sigh=
          Due to my Crohn’s, I have spent much more of the last 10 years taking Cipro than I have NOT taking Cipro. As soon as you demonstrate any sign of Crohn’s activities, bam: Cipro. All that antibiotic use cannot be good for me or society in the long run, but it does seem to help, to a degree, and when you’re suffering, you’ll do anything to make it stop.

          Painkiller junkies are usually amongst the most annoying patients. They are very determined, very manipulative, and very educated on the subject.

      • Phillip in L.A.

        I don’t disagree with the general point of your comment, BeccaM; the 12-hour dosing is a crock of shit, when one studies the pharmacological data, especially the AUC (area under the curve), which is roughly the period of greatest pain relief.

        Sweeping statements about pain relief and addiction are problematic, at best, imo, because: (a) “4 hour pills at much lower doses” are freely available for doctors to prescribe and patients to buy–usually at MUCH LOWER PRICES, too!; and (b) many studies show that for folks with actual pain, opioids affect the body differently, than when those substances are taken ‘recreationally’

    • CanuckDon

      Was just reading this morning that pharmaceutical companies paid some $6.4 billion dollars last year to market their damn drugs and doctors LOVE to help them out with major financial kickbacks of course. Those big yachts don’t run on air you know!

    • ChrisMorley

      The Guardian analyses and explains

      America’s opioid crisis: how prescription drugs sparked a national trauma
      – Aggressive marketing of painkillers made from opium poppy led to a
      generation of addicts and the deaths of almost 100 people a day from
      overdoses

      https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/oct/25/americas-opioid-crisis-how-prescription-drugs-sparked-a-national-trauma

      • another_steve

        The amount of money that the pharmaceutical companies pour into advertising here in the states is absolutely amazing. When patients pay the outlandishly high cost of brand name drugs, they’re paying for that advertising.

        Anyone who watches cable news here knows what I’m talking about.

        Drug commercial after drug commercial after drug commercial.

        • Phillip in L.A.

          However, there may be a difference between ‘brand’ name drugs and generics, because federal regulations only require generics to contain on average, 80-120% of the marked dose

          • vorpal 😼

            Really??? I did NOT know this!
            Interesting!

          • Phillip in L.A.

            Yes–I have read it in the federal regulations about generic drugs (from FDA, iirc).(*) If you would like an actual citation, I would be happy to find it for you–just let me know!

            (*) I’ve also discussed it with a very old friend who is a Professor Of Organic Chemistry at a prestigious institution, and who also sits on one of the FDA-generic-drug Review Panels–she pointed this out to me!

          • vorpal 😼

            Oh, no worries… I believe you wouldn’t lie to me and don’t need a citation. I’m just quite surprised, to be honest. That’s a big acceptable margin of error in dosage. I wonder how many generics exploit that toward the lower end of the range deliberately to save money.

          • Phillip in L.A.
  • Sam_Handwitch

    now here is my stupit hukspin

  • Tomcat
    • Jonathan Smith

      hell no.

  • GayOldLady

    One more face lift, eye lift and Melania won’t be able to see.

    • Tawreos

      And she’ll be bearded.

      • GayOldLady

        Thank you Joan Rivers

        • madknits

          That dimple on her chin is actually her navel.

  • AdamTh

    But I thought special agent Jared already solved that opioid problem…

    • John30013

      I was going to write the same thing.

      What *is* Jared even doing these days, besides drawing a government paycheck he doesn’t deserve?

  • kareemachan

    What, his dealer ran out?

  • TrueWords

    For decades, communities of color have been devastated by the opioid crisis with thousands dying, families torn apart and communities destroyed but now that it’s a problem in white communities, it gets addressed.

    This is yet another example of systemic racism and how it takes things to become a “white” issue for it to be addressed.

    • Gustav2

      It started long ago, this is small town Ohio in 2008, then it came to the larger cities. We had a minimal heroin and opioid problem in Columbus until the last few years.

      http://www.oprah.com/own-oprahshow/oprah-talks-to-a-family-addicted-to-heroin

      • Joe in PA

        And not far away in Huntington WV. as well. See my note to @disqus_6azOFNFYAz:disqus.

        • TrueWords
          • Todd20036

            Could have been worse. They could have asked for a McDs supply truck because the “secret ingredient” to McRibs was ready

        • Gustav2

          10 years ago my elderly neighbors didn’t believe me when I told them there was more heroin in Mansfield than Columbus. I had to print out stories not in the local paper in Columbus.

    • Joe in PA

      I hear ya, and it then moved to white poverty areas: Huntington WV. ;( But having said that, I wonder if this is really getting “addressed”. It is the Trump admin. 🙁

      Interesting doc:

      http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/la-ca-heroin-documentary-opiods-20170920-story.html

      • TrueWords
        • vorpal 😼

          I have taken many different opioids (almost anything you can think of other than heroin), and of all the opioids I have done, oxycodone aka OxyContin was by far the most addictive, even if it was by no means the strongest.

          For the three years I took it daily, my brain would literally spend all day shouting, “OXY! OXY! OXY! OXY!”

          When I was switched to the much stronger hydromorphone (aka Dilaudid / Hydromorph Contin), the psychological addiction dropped dramatically.

          • Phillip in L.A.

            I think it’s Purdue’s formulation that made OxyContin so ‘addictive,’ not the actual underlying substance (but I am not a pharmaceutical chemist, so please correct me if that is wrong).

            Then again, perhaps oxycodone hits μ-agonist receptors differently than oxymorphone/hydromorphone (but one wouldn’t think so)

          • vorpal 😼

            I really don’t know. I did find oxycodone (even just as Percocet) far more euphoric than most other opioids, which could just be a weird chemical property. Hydromorphone, for example, is a far stronger opioid, but much less euphoric and more nod-heavy. Perhaps it has to do with more action at the kappa- or delta-opioid receptors, but I’d have to look up the binding affinities.

            Actually, I lied: U-47700 was far more addictive than oxycodone, but not available via prescription. U-47700, though, is nuts: the tolerance builds so quickly (I could take it for three days and by the third day, take doses that would have killed me four times over on the first day), and the withdrawal is intense and excruciating, but thankfully, very short-lived. EDIT: It is the =best= feeling I have ever felt in my life by a vast margin.

            I’m glad that most places have made U-47700 illegal. It is called the crack-cocaine of opioids for good reason. Indeed, Prince died from a combination of it and a fentanyl analogue, I believe.

          • Phillip in L.A.

            Good post, o spawn of Bastet! You also cracked the Pandora’s Box of poly-drug abuse, which many of the reported “opioid” “ODs” turn out to be (i.e., not just opioids, but opioids plus alcohol, tranquilizers/benzos, etc.)

          • vorpal 😼

            Exactly. And benzos are often handed out like candy.

            I have a system that is extraordinarily tolerant of CNS depression, but if most people were to take the combinations of drugs I’ve been knowingly prescribed by doctors, they would be blue and dead in a puddle of their own vomit.

          • Phillip in L.A.

            It could also be just an idiosyncrasy of your personal biochemistry! I find them all to be more or less interchangeable, but with varying intensity of (expected) side-effects; so, the one that works best for me is the one with the fewest (or least) side-effects that still gets the job done. (There are also externalities at play. For example, fentanyl patches work pretty well for pain, and do not cause me much constipation; but the adhesive on the patches is another story! I had to get special wipes with some solvent in it, to get that goo off my skin. And changing them every 2-3 days is a tremendous nuisance!)

          • vorpal 😼

            Is it common to have to change a fentanyl patch every 2-3 days? I don’t know much about them but I would have guessed that they would last longer.

            The buprenorphine patch lasts a week (I have worn it longer) and surprisingly sticks tightly, stays on (despite my swimming in a pool), and comes off quite clean!

            Opioids apart from loperamide have never made me remotely constipated, even in vast doses, like 100 mg of hydromorphone / day.

            Yes, biochemistry is so individual. I am amazed, for example, at how differently people react to similar benzodiazepines. For example, I don’t find alprazolam remotely recreational, but many people seem to. I do find clonazepam mildly recreational, but most people do not.

            Then again, what role the metabolites of these substances play and how well each of us metabolizes them is highly individual, as is our brain chemistry, so that plays all sorts of roles, I would imagine. I’m quite surprised you find opioids so interchangeable… to me, they are all quite different, but obviously with similar traits.

            I love the intense opioid itch from histamine being triggered, but I only get it, for example, on oxycodone and U-47700, and have never experienced it on any other.

          • Phillip in L.A.

            Yeah, I think it’s pretty common. I think the “prescribing information’ recommended 72 hours, but everyone knows those mnfrs lie!

            It amazes me that it stays on in the pool! (This was another externality that varied among mnfrs of generic patches. Some stayed on; others, not so well.)

            I do not like the itch; who likes to itch? You, I guess! I get that more from morphine sulphate, plus terrible constipation.

            Is U-47700 nalbuphine? or alphaprodine? Ever tried butorphanol? I don’t know if we made it this far, in our previous conversation on the subject….

            P.S. One factor not mentioned in the previous posts on OxyContin, is that the mnfrs upped the danger factor by removing acetaminophen–oxycodone was previously only available in the U.S. in Vicodin-like mixtures, which would kill you fast from kidney failure, if you took too much! I’m sure you know this.

          • vorpal 😼

            Ha! You should see me on a U-47700 binge. (Well, it won’t happen again, but back in the day.) I would strut around the house naked, happy as can be, with a big manly long-handled plastic pink scrub brush in one hand vigorously scratching myself all over my body! The scrotum itching is the best part. SO satisfying to scratch… it feels like heaven!

            Morphine was completely useless to me, which is funny, because it’s hypothesized that almost all of the other morphinans have to be metabolized into morphine before they do much of anything. I went three days on morphine, hated every second of it, and demanded to go back on the oxycodone. (That’s when I got switched to hydromorphone, now that I think about it, and that was probably the best thing that happened to me at that time.)

            U-47700 is neither, and it’s not a morphinan at all… it’s a novel opioid invented by Upjohn in the 1970s when they were exploring a family of opioids and looking for ones that were specific to targeting the kappa-opioid receptor. U-47700 was the strongest of the family for the mu-opioid receptor and has an estimated 7.5x the potency of morphine per mg. On a binge, I would start at around 30 mg / 90 minutes, but by the third day, I could easily tolerate 150 mg / 90 minutes.

            I have never tried butorphanol, nor am I familiar with it. I see it’s an antagonist – agonist, which is unsurprising since it has one of those weird 3- or 4-ring carbon polygons on the “right” of the typical depiction of the molecule, which seem to generally result in some antagonism.

            I’m going to be pedantic again… I think you mean liver failure and not kidney failure wrt acetaminophen? I am all for removing acetaminophen from pain pills: they simply invite liver damage in abusers, who will push the limits even if they have good sense, and that’s the last thing we need. I’d much rather see other “uncomfortable” but safe chemicals added as deterrents for abuse IF one is going to insist on that, such as guaifenesin.

          • ZhyKitty

            Ooooohhhh….
            Well… I liked crack far, far too much, so I’m probably better off never trying U-477700. It does sound lovely, though!

          • vorpal 😼

            I can almost guarantee you would love it.

            I certainly did… best feeling in the whole world. It is like being hugged by a perfectly temperature controlled layer of loving, purring kittens. I have never felt so comfortable and so healthy and so euphoric, all at the same time.

            I would go on three day benders where I wouldn’t sleep for two nights and couldn’t because I would just be thinking about the next dose of U-47700, since it only lasts around 90 minutes.

            I almost overdosed multiple times, and was genuinely scared for my life twice. Really a dangerous substance due to the severe compulsion to redose.

            It is now illegal in many places, including China where it was predominantly manufactured. I think this is probably a good thing for the world, but I’m still very glad I got to have a few (maybe 7-10) amazing 2-3 day binges with it.

          • Cattleya1

            The problem is that these are all messy drugs. We have mu receptors in a number of places in the brain and without. The only ones we want activated are the ones responsible for pain suppression. The devil is in the details. They also activate mu receptors in the reward centers (addiction), brainstem (nausea), skin (itching), gut (constipation). Fast onset opioids with fast clearance are the most addictive and tend to have the highest side-effect profile. Add to this that the numbers and distribution of these receptors are different in each individual. We need to fund research to find new drugs. Ones which do not have high addictive potential and still provide adequate pain relief.

          • kareemachan

            I am very glad that my system doesn’t do well with things like Oxy.

          • vorpal 😼

            I really wish my system did better with marijuana, but I’ve tried dozens of different sativas, indicas, and blends, and they all just make me feel anxious, confused, and antisocial.

            I haven’t tried CBD oil, but I’d have to learn to make it since I don’t think I could get it here.

            Unfortunately, my system does =very= well with opioids and dissociative anaesthetics (like ketamine, PCP, and relatives).

          • Phillip in L.A.

            CBD is non-psychoactive, but it might have some effect on pain.

            Unfortunately, since Nixon and Jerome Jaffee (his drug czar) placed cannabis in Schedule I (the same as heroin, crack cocaine, and LSD), we don’t really know much, because it was so difficult to do research on those substances.

          • vorpal 😼

            Insane, isn’t it? LSD shouldn’t be in that category either, since nobody in the history of humanity (to my knowledge) has ever died from an LSD overdose, and people have accidentally ingested thousands of times the active dose.

          • FAEN

            They gave me oxy after an accident but I couldn’t take it-it made me so sick they had to give me something else. That still made me a little loopy but at least I didn’t feel like I was in a tornado being smacked around.

          • vorpal 😼

            It can cause severe nausea (always unpleasant) and itching (which some – like me – find very pleasant) in many people. You can usually take diphenhydramine (Benadryl) to reduce / eliminate these, but yeah, if it’s severe, it’s better to go with a different option.

          • FAEN

            It really did make me feel I was in a whirlpool and after my first dose I stopped. I opted for the night of pain rather than take it.

          • ZhyKitty

            The doctor gives me phenergan for nausea, and amitiza for constipation. Both work well!

          • vorpal 😼

            I had to look both of those up, as I’m not familiar with brand names.

            Looks like phenergan is probably similar in effect to diphenhydramine (Benadryl) and hydroxyzine, as they’re both early generation antihistamines. I was so amused last night to learn that diphenhydramine is actually a mild local anaesthetic! I chew my coated pills – not to overcome any long-term formulation, as they’re still instant release – because my digestive system is much shortened and I don’t need the extra layer to digest and risk them not absorbing. They always numb my tongue and gums.

            Amitiza… so you do get chronic constipation from opioids, even after prolonged use? As someone with Crohn’s, the opposite has always been my issue… thankfully, there’s loperamide (Imodium), which I still need on top of opioids!

          • ZhyKitty

            Not to mention, Dilaudid works so much better, too!
            I wish I could get it instead of the oxy!

        • Joe in PA

          Incredible…but that article is more like a book. 🙂 I’m only 1/3 of the way through…but a horrible soundbite:

          opioids were killing roughly 142 Americans each day, a tally vividly described as “September 11th every three weeks.”

          Sigh.

          • TrueWords

            KNOWLEDGE IS POWER…you can finish it as it needs to be READ and SHARED with as many people as possible

      • jerry

        Huntington and Charleston, and southern WV in general, started a long time ago with meth and crack. Police really cracked down and it switched to prescribed opioid pills…the state was flooded with the pills from the pharmaceutical industry, and doctors/pharmacists went along. Now, to lower their liability, almost every doctor, hospital or clinic will send patients to a “pain management clinic”, rather than write the prescription themselves.

        • vorpal 😼

          The problem with this is that the wait list for pain management clinics can be insane. It took me six months to get into one in Canada, and even then, as a requirement to even see the pain management doctor, I had to take a 12 week course in mindfulness meditation that she taught weekly to prove that I was serious about pain management and not just a junkie looking for a script writer.

          Must say that while at the time, I really had no interest in the meditation and just really wanted a stronger prescription to ease my pain, years later, I started up the mindfulness meditation and it has been an invaluable tool in managing my Crohn’s pain, my anxiety, and my ADHD. I’m far more thankful to that doctor for making me learn that than I am for the big boost in opioids she gave me back in the day.

          • Phillip in L.A.

            Mindfulness meditation is key for helping manage chronic pain (imo, and I have personal experience of almost 20 years)

          • vorpal 😼

            It works surprisingly well at making the pain “not matter” nearly as much once you develop a consistent practice, and just generally enhances life in so many other ways that I really cannot recommend it enough.

            Most people, though, find it difficult to change their routines, and want instant solutions. I understand, and know I’ve been guilty of that before as well.

            However, were it not for cognitive behavioural therapy, I might very well still be housebound from the paralytic anxiety (GAD, PAD, and SAD) that I had in my early 20s.

          • Phillip in L.A.

            People can be remarkably foolish! A friend, who could benefit from meditation immensely (as can we all), refused to even try, on the somewhat arbitrary and decidedly absurd ground that, ‘I can’t learn how to do that!’ I was soothingly trying to explain to her that it was one of the simplest things in the world….

            I asked her if she was breathing; she said yes; I said, ‘you can do it–you’re doing it now!’ She remained unconvinced, and has refused to try. Idiotic.

          • vorpal 😼

            I have so many friends who struggle with crippling anxiety, but absolutely refuse to give cognitive behavioural therapy a go, despite the fact that I have the course I did (which was MP3s and I could do it at home) and make it available to them. They are convinced that it just “won’t work” for them, despite the fact that I was often much worse than they were (housebound, as I think I told you) and it changed my life.

            I have a friend right now who is struggling deeply with depression and looking for any kind of meaning. I have recommended him to just try five minutes of meditation, and he keeps saying that he knows he should, but he can’t bring himself to do it.

            Establishing any kind of new pattern is astoundingly hard. As you know, I am that way about reading: I yearn to read much more, but I just… cannot… pick up a book and read more than three pages, when it is the easiest thing in the world.

            People are weird. At least you and I are delightfully so ;-).

          • jerry

            Yeah, I had an uncle that had to go to one…really long wait to get in, and he really didn’t want any of the opioid pills anyway (cancer recovery).
            Just reminded me of a (ostensibly) gay bar I went to (once) in Charleston, WV, in 2003 or 2004, before it closed, called Trax. I’ve been to cities all across the country, and to really bad sections in many of them, and have never seen anything like that bar. It was on the west side near low-income housing projects…half the crowd was stick thin, and everyone started hustling you the second you walked in, trying to get money for their next fix (at that time it was the crack and meth). It closed a couple months after I was there because the owner was also dealing. I think that was the only time I was actually afraid when I left a bar (sizable crowd outside the bar, many with weapons)–even going back 35 + years when you had to watch out for gay bashers.

      • Lawerence Collins

        You have to ask?!
        President Toxic 🍊🤡💩 has an industrial bidet. Nothing will clean that mess. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/d3e21c7b690b1fca77ccc0971a970ee45249f5dfb8ea2b58d4647680d533935f.jpg

    • TrueWords
      • vorpal 😼

        If you read up on the history of drug criminalization, racism against Mexicans and African-Americans were the primary motivations in criminalizing both marijuana and cocaine respectively.

        • TrueWords

          I know I know…it was a way to make others feel “safe” and morally superior

          • vorpal 😼

            “While you are at work, lazy Mexicans high on the devil’s weed are drugging and raping your innocent white women!”

            I’m sure that happened precisely zero times, but facts aren’t important.

          • Phillip in L.A.
          • FAEN

            Kinda like the border wall which will accomplish nothing.

    • Jeffg166

      It’s been said it starts in the ghetto and spreads outward.

      • Tiger Quinn

        Yeah, by you, here. which is bullshit.

    • Phillip in L.A.

      Remember Ronald Wilson Reagan (666) and the “War on Drugs”? Remember Richard Milhouse Nixon and the federal Controlled Substances Act (CSA) [of the “Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970]?
      Fuck Disqus

    • Circ09

      Very true. But I want to extend this as a class issue too. Because this crisis has been affecting poor white communities for over a decade too. It wasn’t until white and more affluent suburbanites had problems getting their regular prescriptions filled and bitching about it and/or died from opioids that all this came to a head.

    • fahvel

      but that is the usa standard – all for whites. usa never faught a war against a “white” nation! (wwII does not count) and actually has never won a war of it’s own anyhow unless you count the amazing battle for Grenada. There’s a reason more of you are doped up and it’s almost understandable.

    • Eddie Besketti

      same with GRID. It was a fag disease – right? No need to take care of it. It’ll take care of itself.

  • HZ81

    Problem: Every time I see him, I want opioids.

  • HZ81

    So he has ZERO actual plans.

    • PickyPoussin

      Maybe they’re just ‘secret.’

    • Jonathan Smith

      he has the BEST plans.
      better than doctors, cops or anyone.
      he just wont share them

    • Hunter M

      Why should this be any different?

  • Sam_Handwitch
    • BobSF_94117

      I’ve been worrying about this case. The usual suspects are spending a lot of time and money doing a better than usual job of raising this issue in public spaces.

    • greenmanTN

      I would consider it an honor to push Sessy into a woodchipper.

  • Harveyrabbit

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/10/30/the-family-that-built-an-empire-of-pain

    “The Sackler dynasty’s ruthless marketing of painkillers has generated billions of dollars—and millions of addicts”~

    ~”While the Sacklers are interviewed regularly on the subject of their generosity, they almost never speak publicly about the family business, Purdue Pharma—a privately held company, based in Stamford, Connecticut, that developed the prescription painkiller OxyContin.”

  • GayOldLady

    I can’t listen to another word.

    • PickyPoussin

      Turn it off, GOL. It’s all just a PR stunt anyway.

      • GayOldLady

        I did. UGH! He’s so hideous!

        • PickyPoussin

          he physically (and mentally) repulses me.

          • GayOldLady

            My impulse is to reach through the screen and slap the shit out of him. He’s so disgusting.

      • Phillip in L.A.

        Stay away from steaming pots of wine today, mon poussin; with that get-up you are just asking to become coq au vin!

    • Jonathan Smith

      you actually are watching him?
      you are a stronger person than i

  • bambinoitaliano

    Sniff…sniff….opioid is such a crisis…sniff…sniff…..a disaster…sniff….I inherited from Obama….sniff…sniff….kids don’t do drug…sniff….sniff…
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/ab08b4041ef3cb1335e3eb305eff880081c290785fe9fafba3d2363857cd06b3.jpg

    • zhera

      Ooooh, where’s that story about Eric Trump and his mayhem trip to Iceland? that was a fun read, and so relevant to this!

    • ZhyKitty

      Exactly.
      Also, those of us who take opiates daily for problems like my rheumatoid arthritis are already having enough trouble getting the meds in the amounts that we need for relief without them making life even harder on us.
      I wish he’d stfu and just go back to playing golf where he can’t hurt anyone else.

      • Lawerence Collins

        Long time no see. Hope you’re well as to be expected. Do you not have Rx cannabis where you are? Or is it cost prohibitive?

        • ZhyKitty

          Oh no… I live in the deep south where weed is illegal.

          • Lawerence Collins

            Ah, that’s awful. It helps so much.
            Wishing you peace and good health

      • marachne

        This is my biggest fear – that we’re about to go back to the bad old days where pain medication was only given out as a last possible resort, no matter the level of pain.

    • Gustav2

      “If we can teach young people not to take drugs… it’s really, really easy not to take them.”

      — President Trump

      • bambinoitaliano

        “If we can teach young people not to tell lies….it’s really, really east not to to become a con man.”
        – The Fucking Moron

      • Phillip in L.A.

        Trans: ‘If we can teach young people not to take drugs, then the pharmaceutical industry would go belly-up, so we’re not doing that.’

    • Snarkaholic

      “First you get (steal) the money, then you get (steal) the power…
      …THEN you get (grab) the pussies!” ~Phony Trumptana, definitely

  • HZ81

    Chris Christie is on it, folks. Well, he does look like shitting is a problem for him.

  • Bluto

    his plan is tremendous & special, believe him. that’s what he came up with.

  • Leo
    • ChrisMorley

      Reminder: on Sunday

      Russia puts British Putin critic on Interpol wanted list

      – Vladimir Putin said to have agreed to move against Bill Browder, who has battled Moscow over ‘Magnitsky Act’

      https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/oct/21/russia-british-businessman-bill-browder-interpol

      • Lumpy Gaga

        TY

    • This is good. Apparently for some time now, Russia’s been abusing Interpol to harass people whose only real crime was offending Russia or bringing attention to their oligarchs’ corruption.

  • HZ81

    And he cannot name it? Jesus.

    • kanehau

      Probably fentanyl

  • Dagoril

    Drumpf’s Oxy addict voters aren’t going to like any interference in their ready supply of opioids. Not one bit.

    • Phillip in L.A.

      At least now we have found at least one (almost) plausible psycho-pharmacological excuse, that might explain why a person of purportedly “average intelligence” would vote for the Prez’not!

    • bambinoitaliano

      The Nazi that operates the opioid business are not going to like it either.

  • pch1013

    What’s he going to do, visit a rehab center and toss alcohol swabs at people?

    • Bluto

      big, beautiful swabs. the best, tremendous swaps.

    • Tomcat

      Toss oxy.

  • Tomcat

    Knowing trump he will increase the number of addicts and increase the amount of drugs. He is such a putz.

  • Tomcat

    Permanent prison for users. Good for his donors that run prisons.

    • Tomcat

      Oops, I meant poor users. Rich ones alright.

      • Rich addicts will have a choice:
        1) All the drugs they want and immunity from legal prosecution
        2) A long vacation at a European clinic if they ever decide they feel like stopping

        • Tomcat

          Paid by taxpayers. Because they caused it.

        • Jonathan Smith

          so, same old shit, different day?

    • Jonathan Smith

      yes, but who pays him more?
      private prisons or drug makers?

      • Tomcat

        Oh, they still get the drugs, just in prison.

        • Tomcat

          Win, win for him.

  • -M-

    Make big promises then offer a mostly symbolic gesture after nine months.

  • Lazycrockett

    Ive got it on mute, but the people behind him are stunned with whatever he is saying.

  • Bluto

    We’re back to “Just say no.”

  • PickyPoussin

    He’s just such a putz.

  • Phillip in L.A.

    IF ONLY all the law-enforcement $$$ squandered on the demonstrably counter-productive “War on Drugs” had been used to bolster US mental health and addiction treatment….

    Guns N’ Roses–“Mr Brownstone” (Slash/I. Stradlin)

    “We’ve been dancing with Mr Brownstone/
    He’s been knocking/
    He won’t leave me alone./
    (No, no, no, he won’t leave me alone.)/”

    “I used to do a little/
    But the little wouldn’t do it/
    So the little got more and more/
    I just keep trying to get a little better/
    Said a little better than before.”

    https://youtu.be/lBwua-h6_VY

  • Lazycrockett

    Its not the youth that are oding on heroin dumbass. Its working white class adults.

  • Daveed_WOW

    Is that like declaring bankruptcy?
    https://media.giphy.com/media/Qa5dsjQjlCqOY/giphy.gif

  • BlindBill

    Frees up grant money ……is that code for “pray away the addiction” so faith based programs can make grab for taxpayer funds? Will Mr.ladybird Crazy eyes have a new Bentley so he can kneel with oxy-moms?

  • HZ81

    The military hates you.

  • Lars Littlefield

    Not to worry. In three weeks he’ll fly over the country and announce the epidemic is over, because: 1. his incredible response time and 2. because he says so.

  • Lazycrockett

    Addicts are not going to be turning in their drugs this saturday.

  • HZ81

    Turn in Day is the dumbest fucking thing I’ve ever heard.

    • greenmanTN

      I’d amend that to the dumbest fucking thing I’ve heard TODAY because you damn well know there will be something just as bad or worse tomorrow.

      • HZ81

        Good point. A lot of time left in this one, too. God!!NOOOO!!!

  • greenmanTN

    Are we sure this isn’t just a criminal justice crackdown to keep those new privately owned prisons nice and full? When it comes to this administration, think of worst scenario you can, then go even darker.

  • Lazycrockett

    Its a local issue and the locals don’t want to do anything bout it. Hell some sheriffs are refusing to use narcam on people.

    • The_Wretched

      Not using narcan is negligent homicide in some cases. I’ve heard interviews with those police chiefs and it’s all christian right wing nut job bs.

  • Lazycrockett

    Drugs are coming from china. not mexico.

    • Lazycrockett

      Hell I can buy fentnyl on line.

    • Tomcat

      The dangerous ones that are synthetic do come from China.

      • Tomcat

        Yeah, that is one of theirs.

    • PickyPoussin

      Jinah?

      • William

        Gyna.

        • pj

          dinah ……shore. was gay.

  • Joe in PA
    • kareemachan

      I heart this guy….

  • Lazycrockett
    • Joe in PA

      Sarah Huckabilly’s jersey?

    • PickyPoussin

      Reminder: ‘Tis the season for ‘early risers.’ Keep an eye out, people of CA.

    • William

      Way back when, Nancy tried to link marijuana use to gay sex.
      “Smoke a J and it will turn you gay!”

    • pj

      that worked….

  • Treant

    “There ain’t enough opioids in the White House! Melania’s withdrawal-riding a Secret Service guy! Bad! Wrong! Send drugs!”

    How close did I get, ’cause I ain’t watching that shit.

  • MikeBx2

    They are always looking for a way to normalize him. Stop it.
    https://twitter.com/davidaxelrod/status/923621055289352198

    • Joe in PA

      WTF Axelrod? Good grief.

      • The_Wretched

        Easily scared Axelrod always was part of the problem. He was good as an effectuater but eventually was promoted to decision making and that wasn’t in his skill set.

  • Jean-Marc in Canada

    …and with that, the private investors of prisons salivated at the thought of new and greater profits….

  • HZ81

    Step down. That would help with my addiction issues.

  • Tomcat

    Maybe it is time for Democrats to move to the blue states and leave the red ones to suffer from their deeds.

    • HZ81

      It’s the wall I’d like.

      • Gustav2

        HEY!

        Are you going to run a refugee program for us?

      • Tomcat

        If only we could drag the blue states together into a new region, would be nice.

  • Lazycrockett

    Portugal legalized everything and now hey have the lowest abuse problems in the world.

    • Bluto

      yup, & reallocated funding from prosecution to treatment. Worked well.

      • zhera

        Gosh, what a concept! I’m amazed that even one country managed to think so progressively. Watch how it’ll be ignored by all non-progressives world-wide…

    • kareemachan

      Well, that’s just silly talk. /s

    • Jeffg166

      It’s much less fun if it isn’t illegal.

    • Phillip in L.A.

      Didn’t the Swiss also have a similar experience with legalizing heroin?

  • tonyg

    Did Big Pharma not pay their fealty?

  • bkmn

    Want a quick and easy way to put a real dent in the opioid epidemic? Legalize pot and encourage growers to focus on CBD products.

  • Lazycrockett

    Turn each other in!!!!!

    • Lazycrockett

      That’s not nazi speak at all.

  • HZ81

    Van Jones and Chris Cilizza are probably fighting each other over who gets to say “He became President today!”

  • alc2018

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/9d006acb74ca375ce57b7f6c862f8cfdba7f633c6fff4d83c102ae08413c2c0e.jpg trust and believe if he copies my just say no campaign I’m coming back from the dead and beating his ass…just sayin’

    • coram nobis
    • William

      The leader of the Young Repuglicans at my high school held a ‘Just Say No’ rally. He requested some official paraphernalia from Nancy’s people. They sent it, along with a bill for the stuff and for using the name at the event.

    • Lars Littlefield

      Skinny bitch with prolapsed cooch says what?

      • Phillip in L.A.

        Skinny DEAD bitch….

  • William

    This probably isn’t the day to ask my doc for a Vicodin prescription.

    • HZ81

      Or the best day. Especially if your doctor hates Trump and is vindictive.

    • Tomcat

      The VA has already cut back on strong drugs. After all all the clients with traumatic brain injuries can get guns now so they can get their good drugs elsewhere.

      • Tomcat

        And there are over 100,000 of them.

      • William

        Various VA doctors have had my partner on Vicodin for over ten years. His new doc keeps talking about taking him off it. I said sure, as long as he is in a facility for the withdrawal.

  • HZ81

    So, expect no changes or help, because eventually, something will happen.

  • Lazycrockett

    Oh another family I dont want to be a member of. Joy.

  • HZ81

    We’ll take care of vulnerable communities – by taking away their healthcare.

  • Lazycrockett

    Well thats a big nothing burger.

  • Blake J Butler

    I’d like Puerto Rico for a neighbor instead of Mississippi.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=jFVJwFN_a0o

    • djcoastermark

      Wow, the republican convention down there is a real eye opener.

    • blackstar

      speechless.

    • William

      Get rid of the implants, your stripper days are over.

      • Blake J Butler

        But she’s got a good heart, and being gay is like my eyes are elsewhere than her implants.

    • Margie

      When I first saw one of her videos I felt so bad for her and then I found out she was a comedienne!

  • Tomcat

    But everyone needs to remember trump fixed the problem of not being allowed to say Merry Christmas. He can do it all.

  • HZ81

    Thank you, President Shithead.

  • The_Wretched

    Reload for a new Trump photo in the OP. yeeesh. Horror movies have nothing on him.

    • William

      Did Donnie make a boom-boom?

  • Bluto

    there we go, problem solved. velveeta voldemort gives himself a 10 out of 10.

  • Lazycrockett

    WTF is he signing?

    • Gustav2

      Another EO that fixes everything!

      • Lazycrockett

        OMG all my drugs and alcohol have disappeared!! Im free!!

    • boatboy_srq

      Wait. He SIGNED this one? Didn’t just proclaim it and walk away?

  • The_Wretched

    Trump still has his sniffing problem.

    • boatboy_srq

      Not an opioid, so not part of the problem. Can we start talking about his Namenda habit?

  • Cuberly Deux

    What’s the catch….is he giving fed $$$ to Evangelical pastors so they’ll pray it away?

    • PickyPoussin

      That’d be my guess. ‘Faith-Based Initiatives.’

    • Gustav2

      Yup, When one Ohio Republican congresscreep keeps saying Medicaid treatment doesn’t help the addicted,

    • Joe in PA

      I think it’s going to be in private prisons/rehabs. 🙁

      • Cuberly Deux

        I can’t see them going to professionals that have studied the complexities of the epidemic. There’s a revulsion towards expertise within the GOP, as cynical as it sounds I bet it’s a combo of what you said along with a “Just say no.” styled ad campaign.

  • Blake J Butler
  • yes b’y

    Oh I believe, he has pivoted

    • Joe in PA

      I’m so tired of winning. 🙁

    • Paul

      Is that like “he is becoming so presidential”….been there -done that

    • clay

      I’m waiting for that to become “spinning in his grave.”

      • boatboy_srq

        Not TOO soon, though: pResident Pence is too high a price for that.

  • Blake J Butler
  • DesertSun59

    45 doesn’t do empathy, compassion or sympathy. Nothing will actually happen to reduce the opioid epidemic under his tenure. After all, the reason we have one is due to the PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY LOBBY. He has ZERO intention of pushing back on them.

  • TrueWords

    I urge many of you to read this article:

    THE SECRETIVE FAMILY MAKING BILLIONS FROM THE OPIOID CRISIS

    You’re aware America is under siege, fighting an opioid crisis that has exploded into a public-health emergency.

    You’ve heard of OxyContin, the pain medication to which countless patients have become addicted. But do you know that the company that makes Oxy and reaps the billions of dollars in profits it generates is owned by one family?

    http://www.esquire.com/news-politics/a12775932/sackler-family-oxycontin/

    https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/es-101117-oxycontin-family-1507733616.jpg?crop=0.998xw:1.00xh;0,0&resize=1600:*

  • Tomcat

    Almost everyone that I know that gets Opioids,,, sell most of them on the street.

  • boatboy_srq

    Any bets this will turn into a detain-and-convict-Blah-oxycontin-addicts effort?

  • Texndoc

    Texas legislature, pharmacists and physicians councils came up with their own policies months ago. Why does any POTUS have to even comment on it. Some of the policies I like are no more telephone prescription call ins, the Rx must be written on a pad supplied by the state DEA, no refills, and more than 30 days generates a phone call from the Pharmacist.

    • Lazycrockett

      Yeah but turning off the faucet isn’t going to help those already addicted, that’s why they move to heroin in the first place.

      • Texndoc

        Well they’ve also loosened methadone type treatment regulations (which always requires a certain limited number of physicians and usually begins inpatient) with buprenorphine I think it is that can be Rx’d by many more docs trained to use it, and outpatient. Even your local FP might prescribe it now.

        • Tulle Christensen

          I got my friend into a detox program 4 times before he OD (RIP) he could never seem to kick the habit. He was a good friend too, all the posts today is making me miss him more than I usually do

          • -M-

            Hugs 🤗

      • leastyebejudged

        It makes the situation far worse, they HAVE to turn to criminals to get their supply, this idiotic non solution benefits only once group of people – the asshole dirty pigs that get off on these busts, the pigs that have made careers off the backs of US citizens.

  • FAEN

    So THATS why he was making those snorting sounds during the debates.

    • The_Wretched

      Drinking bad – never drink. (so snort away, never warned about that)

  • bambinoitaliano

    I can hear Pablo Escobar pleading to satan in hell to let him return to Earth for another run.

  • Daveed_WOW

    The memorandum should work wonders. You can practically hear the pills falling out of people’s hands.

  • kareemachan

    That shot looks like he is having an opioid crisis.

    • Friday’s_cat

      Kelly put a shock collar on his junk to keep him on script?

      • yes b’y

        ewwwwwww

  • clay

    Is today’s email blast from the White House about this?
    No, it’s about Ivanka.

  • Mike C

    Gee, his base is in trouble.

  • Hank

    Herr Drumpf is ALL talk and NO ACTION, because he could NOT CARE LESS about people. Reminds me of the Reagan era, Just Say No!!! /s
    Where is the $$$$ to help???

  • Michael R
  • As with the disparity in the treatment of crack cocaine, which was criminalized so that penalties were much worse than for powder cocaine (because white Wall Street millionaires with a spoon up their nose shouldn’t be treated like ordinary people of color, I guess), I am sure that the reason for this opioid emergency not triggering massive arrests is due to the large number of people hooked on opioids are white.

    While I am not objecting to this approach, I’d like to see Trump (or anyone in charge) clear out the prisons and get a lot of those folks treatment instead of prison sentences.

    Historically, our criminalization of drug use has been racially motivated. It started with explicitly racist laws in California prohibiting only Chinese immigrants from smoking opium (SCOTUS did knock that down). It has mostly gone downhill since then.

    • Lars Littlefield

      Another historic fact: criminalizing drugs has not done one thing to eliminate the drug crisis.

  • fuzzybits

    He really looks like he’s got a bad hemorrhoid in that photo.

    • Renfield

      He is a bad hemorrhoid.

  • TexasBoy

    Here is my concern about declaring a war on opioids type thing…while I understand that there are a lot of people abusing the drugs, there are times I really do need an opioid, like when a tooth goes bad, or when I had a rattlesnake bite. Are doctors going to be reluctant to prescribe opioids, even when a patient is in pain. Already I have had a tooth unexpectedly go bad on a weekend, and the dentist could not prescribe a strong pain killer over the phone, he would have had to write a prescription…and he was out of town at the time. The strongest they let him prescribe over the phone was basically Tylenol 3 and I really could have used hydrocodone

    • They already are. People who genuinely need help with chronic pain can’t get what they need.

    • canoebum

      I’d prefer Tylenol 3 over hydrocodone any day. In civilized countries, like Canada and most all of Latin America, adults can purchase low-dose pain relievers such as AC&C over the counter. I find them to be very useful. Generic AC&C which you can get in Canada contains a 8 mg of codeine, less than a third of what you’d get in a Tylenol 3 (30 mg). For older persons such as myself, mild medicines like this are a godsend. I’ve been using them for many years and have never exceed the recommended dosage, typically using one in the morning and one at night. They are especially useful on my canoe trips, when days are spent in strenuous activity and things start to ache. The Big Government Panic over all this will be directed at everyone, regardless of whether or not they use such medications responsibly or not. For me, it’s just another reason to move out of the US as soon as possible.
      (AC&C used to be available in the US, but not anymore. No one even makes it here. Remember Empirin with Codeine? Perhaps if the government would loosen its grip on low-dose medication and instead go after the guys pushing 80 mg oxys, normal people could have a better quality of life without all the hassles of kneeling before the Nanny State).

      • Canadian Observer

        Unfortunately, the Canadian government is making noises about requiring a prescription to purchase what are currently over the counter medications containing codeine – and this is even worse since it will likely be a Health Canada regulation and never have been debated in Parliament.

        • canoebum

          Bad news indeed.

    • Ann Kah

      I’ve had a disc problem, arthritis, a ruptured tendon in my back, a torn muscle in my hip, and bursitis ….all at the same time. Opioids keep me sane.

    • Renfield

      There’s no war, no declaration of anything. Like everything else, it’s just a shitgibbon screeching. That’s it.

  • MarkBuster

    Just expressing my worry that we’ll throw the baby out with the bathwater. A lot of people have very legit needs of these meds.

    • Tomcat

      The problem is the 75% that are faking to get the drugs.

      • LeeCMH

        So we punish people in severe pain? Screws in the spine? Difficult to fake the x-ray.

    • The_Wretched

      Yes, I had a back surgery that included screws into bone. It and the burst disc were very painful and OTC meds were useless. Once the pain lessened, I reduced and then stopped the opiods. I very much needed them.

  • Lars Littlefield

    The man who keeps me warm at night needed two wisdom teeth removed. We checked around. There was the option of going to “Molar City” (Algodones, Mexico, just south of Yuma, AZ). But he preferred not crossing the border for fear
    US Border Security might no let him back in the US. So, we found a famous discount dental clinic in Las Vegas on Eastern Ave. that would do the job for a reasonable fee. We drove down for a weekend appt. They did an excellent job, too. But when they released him they did not offer any pain killers for the after surgery pain.

    “Just buy some Advil and double the dose,” were their instructions. Las Vegas physicians have been scared to within a millimeter of losing their licenses not to prescribed opioids. But a nice person stopped us outside in the parking lot on Eastern Ave. and asked if my partner was in pain.

    “They don’t prescribe pain killers in Vegas anymore,” he informed us. Well, duh. Then he slipped us a piece of paper with cross streets written on it (one of the streets being Charleston).

    “Drive around this neighborhood and you’ll figure it out. Find a shady place to park on the street.” Wink, wink, wink.

    And so we did. It didn’t take long to find a street dealer who could sell us oxycontin ($5 a piece), Fentanyl skin patches ($20 a patch), or heroin (dime bags still only a dime — $10). We purchased ten oxycontin and five Fentanyl patches. I asked our personal street dealer if he had any Acid and he looked at us in horror as if we were drug addicts.

    By now Luiz was writhing, the poor little bugger, and not in a good way. As we drove off I gave Luiz a bottle of water and popped an oxycontin in his mouth. Back at our hotel room he slept quietly for about six hours. He woke, took another oxy and slept until the next morning when he had a followup appointment.

    And that is what ‘Mericuh has become. To afford Part D Medicare benefits we have to buy at a discount on the streets.

    • leastyebejudged

      Weird, I know it’s been a long time since I had mine out – all at once.

      They gave me percocets. oxy and fentianyl are WAY stronger than necessary.

      • Lars Littlefield

        Most folks I know get a bag full of extended-release hydrocodone. BTW, if you noticed, he wasn’t given anything. He was told to just buy Advil and double up the dosage. LOL

  • Halou

    When will he get around to directing his own staff to create a list of Russian individuals and institutions as ordered by the sanctions bill he signed into law? He is 26 days past the deadline. Why the delay?

  • aagold76 .

    I love when it’s a drug problem primarily with us white people- it’s an emergency to be treated- when it’s a drug problem primarily related to black people- it’s a war on drugs to be jailed.

  • Gregory In Seattle

    “… while doing his best (sic) impression of a chipmunk.”

  • Mike

    It’s a cookbook.

    The “opioid” panic is a sham. It’s being sold on the idiotic, untrue “certainty” that taking three days of Percocet or Vicodin for pain after surgery or an injury WILL make a person a drug addict. The “opioid” panickers are convinced that’s how heroin addicts are made. It’s absurd. This “opioid” crap is a drug war strategy and nothing more.

    Ask yourself, does it make any sense at all that Republicans would be wringing their hands with anxiety, in sympathy with drug addicts? Preposterous. Soon, when no one can get a prescription for pain medication no matter how much pain they have, only smug admonitions to rub a little oatmeal and camomile on it, then they will know what an awful thing this is, but then it will be too late.

  • Canadian Observer

    Given the constipated expression on 45’s face, it looks like the opioid crisis is a personal concern (constipation being one of the most common side effects of any opioid).

  • JCF

    Since 11/9/16, never have I more WANTED to be on opioids…

  • teeveedub

    His speech, as well as the speech by his lovely trophy wife, sounded like a high school sophomore’s current events report. It’s clear they know nothing about the subject of addiction – its causes, its consequences, its treatment. 45* approached it like it was primarily an issue of lack of education (“We’ve gotta teach our kids that drugs is bad!”). Secondarily, he treated it like a criminal issue (“We’ve gotta build that wall to keep the drugs out!”).

    I suppose I should be accustomed to his cluelessness by now, but it still stuns me sometimes.

  • Scott MB

    Legalize marijuana and we could get most people off opiods and other narcotics. I am luck that I live in a state that legalized marijuana. After years of chronic back pain and trying everything including Oxy. My Dr took me off Oxy amd I went through 3 days of withdrawl, I was on a low dose so it wasn’t too bad but still was rough on me. Since then I have tried everything other meds, most of which activate my bipolar and/or severe depression, physical therapy, TENS therapy, etc. Nothing worked for me. I am not a candidate for surgery so I just have to deal with the pain. My Dr suggested marijuana. I have used before and it does help with my pain as well as bipolar, depression, and anxiety. Can’t wait to finally be able to be in much less pain and possibly get off my antipsychotics.

    For the first time Republicans have a 51% approval for leagalizing marijuana. Now 64% of Americans support the leagalization of it. If we would just treat the drug epidemic as a health crisis and not a criminal issue people would be more likely to get off them. Other countries have done it and drug use is down and crimes related to drug use are down. It works, but America is a prison hapoy country because prisons have become for profit and they want more sonthey can make more money.

    • leastyebejudged

      Marijuana IS legal where the deaths are still spiking.

      So. Reality tells me that assumption is incorrect.

    • Renfield

      Sadly I don’t think you are correct. I know people who are heroin users and have required medical (EMS) attention due to overdosing. They also like grass. Grass does not replace heroin. Wish it did but it doesn’t.

  • Ann Kah

    Our state, in the attempt to keep kids off opioids, has made it much harder for little old ladies with chronic pain to get relief. I have to make additional visits to the doctor because the pharmacy won’t accept prescriptions more than two weeks old …it’s a real hassle, trying to get a prescription for exactly the right amount to last me until the next scheduled visit.

    Several years ago, there was a movement to make sure that patients got adequate pain relief, because there was “no reason” to deny sufferers. I applauded that. But there seems not to be any mental distinction in the minds of these people between medicine properly used for its intended purpose, and drugs to be abused to get high.

  • BartmanLA

    What’s truly hilarious is he focused on “removing immediately from the market” a drug called Opana, which the FDA removed back in JUNE of this year, it’s ALREADY off the market and this bozo didn’t know it, nor did his people probably fact check to find out what it’s status was. This shows exactly how out of touch this man is and clueless his ability to conduct the office of President is absolutely missing. Why can’t the Republican’s finally do something and remove this man by impeaching him or even invoking the 25th Amendment and let this country start healing soon!!!

    • Renfield

      For the most part everyone who works for him is below his level.

  • Renfield

    Even if the shitgibbon shrieks out something that might sound intelligent or decent (if it came from a live human), it’s not. He’s pure garbage, as is his entire family and everyone who works for him.

  • SDG

    “The move falls short of Mr. Trump’s sweeping promise” that should be the start of EVERY story about him.

  • RJ Bone

    I feel bad for those who have chronic pain who’ve not abused it who will now have an even harder time obtaining it :(. Some of us know we’d struggle with addiction and avoid it. You just try to breathe through it *shrug*. Not many other options.