LISTEN: What US Diplomats In Cuba Heard

The Associated Press reports:

It sounds sort of like a mass of crickets. But not quite. A high-pitched whine, but from what? It seems to undulate, even writhe. Listen closely: Some hear multiple, distinct tones colliding in a nails-on-the-chalkboard effect. The Associated Press has obtained a recording of what some U.S. Embassy workers heard in Havana, part of the series of unnerving incidents later deemed to be deliberate attacks. The recording, released Thursday by the AP, is the first disseminated publicly of the many taken in Cuba of sounds that led investigators initially to suspect a sonic weapon.

The recordings from Havana have been sent for analysis to the U.S. Navy, which has advanced capabilities for analyzing acoustic signals, and to the intelligence services, the AP has learned. But the recordings have not significantly advanced U.S. knowledge about what is harming diplomats. Officials say the government still doesn’t know what is responsible for injuries to its personnel, but the U.S. has faulted Cuba for failing to protect American diplomats on its soil.

But there’s also this from the Guardian:

Senior neurologists have suggested that a spate of mysterious ailments among US diplomats in Cuba – which has caused a diplomat rift between the two countries – could have been caused by a form of “mass hysteria” rather than sonic attacks. The unexplained incidents have prompted the US to withdraw most of its embassy staff from Havana and expel the majority of Cuban diplomats from Washington.

The neurologists who talked to the Guardian cautioned that no proper diagnosis is possible without far more information and access to the 22 US victims, who have suffered a range of symptoms including hearing loss, tinnitus, headaches and dizziness.

US and Cuban investigations have produced no evidence of any weapon, and the neurologists argue that the possibility of “functional disorder” due to a problem in the functioning of nervous system – rather than a disease – should be considered.

“From an objective point of view it’s more like mass hysteria than anything else,” said Mark Hallett, the head of the human motor control section of the US National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

  • JoeMyGod

    Like a lot of guys my age, I have mild but chronic tinnitus. This sounds way worse.

    • Gustav2

      I was going to say, “I hear that all time. ALL THE TIME!” especially in my right ear. There are times it is louder than others.

    • Same. Even worse for my spouse.

    • JoeMyGod

      I was hoping that the audiologist would tell me that my tinnitus is from decades of clubbing so I could at least call it a “war wound” or something.

      But he literally just said, “Naw, dude. You’re just getting old.”

      I nearly smacked him with my walker.

      • Rex

        I told my Doc last time I was there “If you say, as we get older, one more time, so help me…”

      • Ben in Oakland

        Here’s the trick with tinnitus. You have to learn not to listen to it. If you listen to it, you give it power. you learn not to, it mostly goes away.

        • netxtown

          that exact process worked perfectly on an X.
          ding dong the drunk is gone…!

        • Gustav2

          Now we are talking about it, it is louder. lol

          • Ben in Oakland

            I really wasn’t kidding about it. I went for 18 years with having only one of what I would call a “noisy day” each month. Unfortunately, in April. I ended up with some sort of inner ear problem, and it got bad. I finally got a lot better, but I no longer enjoy the I,ended as I used to, at least not every day.

          • ColdCountry

            You are so lucky it went away, at least part of the time. I think I’ve always had “white noise” in my head – thought everyone did – but I remember the morning I woke up and thought, “Holy shit! Who turned up the volume on the white noise?” It was noticeably louder, and has been ever since.

          • Ben in Oakland

            When it first started, it was quite bad, very frightening. I did a lot of research on it, including into ginkgo biloba, which worked somewhat, and white noise generators. What became clear was that no one knew much about it, but that a lot of what passed for treatment was distraction. I have a lot of discipline, so I eventually trained myself not to hear it. And then I found that it seemed to disappear most of the time.

            Until I learned that it wa a king me miserable, which made it worse. It was fine until all of my health went to hell six months ago. It’s mostly returned. But I am not as goood as I was.

            You might look into getting your eardrum perforated by a doctor. It can relieve pressure, which can cause the problem. The doctor who suggested if assured me it would affect my hearing. You might also check with an ENT about budesonide rinsing, which can reduce inflammation and also cause it o lessen.

            Good luck.

          • ColdCountry

            Thanks, I’ll look into some of those – especially if the volume gets turned up again. I’ve also had positional vertigo for years, and then an ear infection in my right ear that took forever to drain. Not sure it ever did entirely. I’m sure those things don’t help. I discovered a few years ago, that if I’m in my bedroom, I can’t hear the phone ring in the kitchen if my left ear is covered. Nothing. Zip, zero, silence. Hadn’t noticed any other issues at all. Went to an audiologist for testing, and tested out normal “for my age,” meaning a little loss in the higher range. I told her that even though I heard the sounds, the quality was different ear to ear, clear in the left, fuzzy in the right. She said that the only person who can say whether there is something amiss, is the person themselves. She said the testing wasn’t sophisticated enough to say. I solved the problem by getting a phone with a different pitched ring. No problems, now. But one of these days, I may give the experts a shot at figuring out the differential issue. Mostly, I can ignore the tinnitus, though it’s harder when I’m tired or not feeling well.

            Good luck to you, too. Hope things get better.

          • Ben in Oakland

            Do you know about the Epley maneuver? PArt of my ear problem earlier this year was positional vertigo, but doing the Epley twice daily really helped. Also, the budesonide rinse might be helpful.

          • ColdCountry

            I use this – I find it works really well. Also, my chiropractor does a good job at keeping it under control.
            https://youtu.be/mQR6b7CAiqk

        • another_steve

          There’s a known phenomenon that sometimes applies to “floaters” – undissolved gel material floating in the vitreous in the back of the eye. People with floaters “see” spots and cloud-like shapes in their lines of vision.

          Sometimes, the human brain just gets tired of dealing with the superfluous, useless data being fed it, and the sufferer stops being aware of the floaters.

          The gel material might still be floating around in the vitreous, but you’re no longer aware of them (unless you concentrate hard on seeing them).

          • Ben in Oakland

            That was another bit of nasty that showed up this year. Like everything else that shows up because of Abe, you learn to get along with it, desire it, past if.

          • ColdCountry

            Gee, thanks for reminding me. Now I’m seeing my floaters.

          • Mark

            Macuguard. Life Extension. Mine are reduced now by 60% and improving.

          • ColdCountry

            Mine aren’t bad, and mostly I don’t notice them. Sometimes there will be a bigger one for a while, but mostly I ignore them, I guess. Sometimes, it is fun to play with them, you know, snap your eyes up/down/left/right, and watch the floaters slowly track after them. (Hey, sometimes I don’t sleep well!)

          • Grumpy Old Man

            Oh, good – someone else plays with them!

          • Mark

            We do whatever we can to entertain ourselves in our older age. lol

          • 3-Star

            One of mine shows up like the “L” on Laverne’s shirt from the Laverne and Shirley TV show. I purposely did not attach a picture because I’m pretty sure this crowd is old enough to remember that image!

        • Dazzer

          The other big trick is to chew gum.

          Any sound that originates in your mouth is one of the most important as far as the brain is concerned. So if you’re chewing something and it affects the nerves of your teeth (an absolutely essential survival instinct), the brain pays more attention to the mouth and chewing than it does to the sound in the ears.

          This technique also works for getting rid off songs that are stuck in your head.

          • another_steve

            “songs that are stuck in your head”

            They’re known in the literature as “earworms.”

            It’s a real thing. There’s been medical/psychological research into them. Anyone interested can google for more info.

          • David in Tucson

            Earworms: annoying tunes that get stuck. For me, sometimes it will be a pop tune, very rarely an ad jingle. I get giant earworms. I had Brahms’ Piano Concerto No. 2 stuck in my head for weeks. The whole damn thing.

          • Dazzer

            Two established ways to deal with earworms:
            1) chew gum to disrupt it;
            2) listen to the music all the way through to the end note at the first opportunity so your brain has heard and understood it in its entirety

            I’ve had exceedingly bad tinnitus in the past and problems with earworms (to an extent, they were both neurologically based) and both techniques worked magnificently for me.

          • another_steve

            I suffer from multiple earworms. On the pop side, this is currently my most severe.

            I’ve banged my head against the wall. To no avail.

            It plays continuously in my head.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMs0GnYze34

          • ColdCountry

            I used to work in a rope factory. There were over 150 rope braiding machines in the room, running at five or six different speeds. The rhythmic beat would usually evolve into just the phrase of a song in my head, and go round and round and round and round for the entire shift. It was exhausting.

          • Mark
          • thatotherjean

            Thank you; I’ll try that.

        • stuckinthewoods

          That’s sort of the way I treat chronic back pain. I name it something else and carry on.

        • ColdCountry

          Mine doesn’t go away, but I do tune it out so it’s not so irritating.

        • Grumpy Old Man

          When I first got high on acid and heard that high-pitched sound, I assumed it was me listening to nerve signals (what I now know is the 8th cranial nerve listening to 9th and 7th) sort of like cross-talk on bundles of phone cables.

          If you are interested, this web-site will knock your socks off while you take a walk through the human body.
          http://www.innerbody.com/anatomy/nervous/head-neck-second-anterior

          • Ben in Oakland

            Thanks.

        • Eddie Besketti

          if you have the gift of tongues – and let’s face it, who doesn’t, then make up your own song and sing it in tongues and in about 2 minutes, that fucking song that you can’t get out of your head, will be pretty much wiped clean from your brain. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aBejyHI6qr0

      • Do Something Nice

        Joe, you’re just getting old.

        ***patiently waiting for my reward punishment***

      • Throw in a little sleep apnea and diabetes, and you’ve got a soup for mild to moderate hearing loss on the high end.

        • Seriously? So that’s why I’m going deaf?!?

      • safari

        Things to look forward to.

      • TuuxKabin

        A friend’s husband had terrible flatulence. Referred to it as SGE, Silent Gas Emissions. Went to the doctor. The doctor entered the examining room, asked what he could do for friend’s husband. The answer was, “doc, I’ve been having these silent gas emissions. While waiting for you in the waiting room I had four SGE’s. Waiting for you to come in to see me I had two more. And since you’ve been in this room I had another two. Can you help me?”

        Doctor replied, “first thing I’m going to do is check your hearing.”

      • Steven B

        Joe. I am a retired audiologist with more than 30 years under my belt. I have to say, without the benefit of seeing your audiogram, that I think your tinnitus is MORE likely due to excessive noise exposure than age related. Yes, tinnitus result from presbycusis (age related hearing loss) but more often than not tinnitus is a result of noise exposure. And it could be that you have both a noise induced hearing loss and age related hearing loss at the same time. Either way, my money is on the war wound.
        That said, I gotta say I’m puzzled by this story. When it first came out this summer I understood that the sounds were inaudible, either subsonic or supersonic. But, whether it’s audible or not, I have never heard of a sound causing the kinds of symptoms described in the article. I’m inclined to think they should look elsewhere. As to that sound in the clip, it’s annoying but not physiologically harmful.
        My 2 cents

        • bsinps

          Thank you for the answer to my Tinitis. It came on as I’ve aged. It’s so annoying. Thanks for the answer from an expert. 😁😁😁

      • Adam Schmidt

        Last time I was in to see my doc he told me I’ve got early stage arthritis. This was only a few weeks after my first mailing from AARP. I think the universe is trying to tell me I’ve gotten old.

        • GayOldLady

          You’re still young by my standards and everyone has arthritis if they get past 40. You’re doing alright if you’re 50.

      • Clive Johnson

        I’m not a nutrition researcher, but I came across this in the past. You might benefit from this or not:

        The Effect of Supplemental Dietary Taurine on Tinnitus and Auditory Discrimination in an Animal Model
        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2997922/

        There’s a lot more to be found on taurine and tinnitus.

      • Andymac3

        I played in a guitar band for over 15 years, playing small and medium venues that usually doubled as clubbing venues on different nights, Sound levels were rough and ready and ever increasing with 3 or 4 different bands playing each night. 5 years after quitting, the hearing in my left ear has deteriorated dramatically and tinnitus has started, drums and symbols were usually to my left, it’s no coincidence.

      • Eddie Besketti

        for 12 years I lived on a very busy and noisy 24/7 blvd. for 12 years I slept with ear plugs. after 12 years we moved to a place where you could hear a pin drop. turns out we could hear the fog horn on the ships in the harbor late at night. well…. I could hear them. my husband couldn’t. then after a few weeks in our new place in the country, we took a trip to Gran Canaria which is a 5½ hours flight away from home – I could still hear the fog horns in the harbor. Who knew tinnitus could have low, uneven tones.

    • GayOldLady

      I have tinnitus so badly I heard nothing listening to what was described as “high pitch cricket sounds” because that’s apparently the sound I hear all the time. It was maddening at first, but I’ve adapted.

      • DonnaLee

        I never listened to loud music my entire life. Is that something you did often?

        • GayOldLady

          Not really. I love music, but not blasting.

      • Octoberfurst

        I have had tinnitus since I was 23. (I’m 59 now.) I was with my friend Herb at a gun range and we were following all the safety precautions: wearing ear protection, checking the area downrange before firing, that sort of thing. Well toward the end my buddy Herb got a little over eager and aimed his .44 magnum at the target before I had my ear protectors on. (He was standing right beside me.) I saw him out of the corner of my eye and started to yell, “DON’T!” when he pulled the trigger. It felt like someone plunged a needle into my right ear! I suddenly had this really loud ringing in my ear and, although the ringing dimmed a bit over the next day or two, it never went away. Thanks Herb!
        I tried different types of homeopathic remedies over the years but, of course none worked. I realized there are no miracle cures. My Doctor told me I just had to live with it. But it would be nice to be able to listen to silence one more time without this damn ringing. But such is life. It’s nice to know I am not alone.

        • GayOldLady

          It’s been so long since I’ve heard silence I’m not sure I’d like it. My sound is like being in a field of crickets on a summer night. I believe it was a medication that began the tinnitus. I thought it would drive me crazy but I adapted over time. I’ve had it about 30 years.

          • Cattleya1

            Did you ever have to take high-dose aspirin? There are also a couple of classes of IV antibiotics which can do it.

          • GayOldLady

            I don’t remember the name of the med, but I had been sick with bronchial asthma and I’d been on an antibiotic and inhaler.

          • Cattleya1

            Usually it is from having to take prolonged Aminoglycosides of Vancomycin. Unfortunately, a lot of us lose the ability to hear high-frequency sounds in our 7th and 8th decades. Mother Nature doesn’t really give a damn about us once we are done with our reproductive years.

          • GayOldLady

            That’s the truth.

        • ColdCountry

          “Silence” always had sound in it that I remember. I used to describe it as the sound you “hear” in a seashell. Now, it’s a lot louder.

      • ColdCountry

        Me too! Had to turn the volume WAY up to hear the noise.

      • AaronD12

        I don’t know a time I didn’t have tinnitus. I believe it was caused by some serious ear infections when I was age 5. Mine are constant tones — mostly high, but a few low — that I’ve learned to ignore for the most part. It does seem that I cannot hear quiet sounds because of the constant sound in my ears/head.

    • William

      I’ve had it as far back as I can remember.

      • Gustav2

        Mine started in my late teenage years, stopped playing the piano and stopped singing.

        • William

          My father has it too. He said he’s never known a time without that noise.

          • David in Tucson

            I’ve had tinnitus since I was in my late teens. It’s always there in the background, but I guess it hasn’t been bad enough to keep me from being a musician.

      • ColdCountry

        Me, too. The expression “ringing silence” made perfect sense to me. It was always there that I remember. Unfortunately, someone turned up the volume a few years back.

    • Xiao Ai: The Social Gadfly

      For a brief moment I thought you might say, mild mass hysteria. Not mild chronic tinnitus. 😀

    • ElenorRigby

      this is a Kate Bush song called “Experiment IV.”

      The told us
      what they wanted
      was a sound that could kill someone
      from a distance

      • Danieruw

        Brilliant!

    • Pip
    • ColdCountry

      That high pitch blended in with my tinnitus so well that I had to crank the volume WAY up to even hear it. All I heard otherwise was a clicking noise.

  • Sam_Handwich
    • Bryan

      “My god it’s full of stars!”

    • Treant

      Even Sarah Huckabee Sanders can’t dance that fast.

  • Leo

    Is it ‘mass hysteria’ on my part that I just don’t want to listen to this? I’m scared.

  • Dayglo

    Victoria Jackson’s voice on a loop could disable anyone.

  • In other words, nobody knows what the fuck is happening.

  • Tawreos

    Could these attacks have anything to do with many wealthy Cuban exiles voting Republican?

    • A L Vee

      I’m wondering if these attacks are a ruse by Trump to break off diplomatic relations.

  • Ragnar Lothbrok

    Great.
    Now, every time I hear a cricket I am going to think there is a Russian in my basement.

    • Gustav2

      You will have to go to a safe place when it is time for the cicadas.

  • Lazycrockett

    Hmm to me it just sounded like crickets. The third sample though did get a bit grating.

  • Leo

    Our mental state? How about Twitler’s?
    https://twitter.com/mic/status/918547593021591553

  • Rex

    Isn’t that from a Mariah Carey album?

    • Lazycrockett

      No that would be a dog whistle.

      • Rex

        I quit playing her albums, my garage door kept going up and down.

  • Treant

    I’ve had computer fans that sound like that.

    Also, excited little girls make that tone regularly.

  • GeneInSJ

    The Russians are behind this. It’s just 1 more way to disrupt us.

    • William

      They didn’t like us making nice with Cuba.

      • Jean-Marc in Canada

        Well, to be honest, neither did we Canadians…for different reasons mind you 🙂

        • William

          Beach hog.

  • Sam_Handwich

    o/t

    this is the guy who quit as director of the Office of Govt Ethics

    https://twitter.com/waltshaub/status/918565778026319872

    • Treant

      Oh, dear. Since I can’t turn on CNN, I hope somebody reports back as to what THAT was.

      • Gustav2

        Will keep you informed.

      • Gustav2

        Ethic experts say it is “unconstitutional” and they benefit him paying at least $63,000 to Mar a Lago in two months this winter. And using a non-discounted rate. CNN has receipts now.

        That is just the Secret Service, not other officials’ rooms.

        • Treant

          Oh, so another non-story since Congress won’t do jack shit about it.

          • Gustav2

            Yup, they just got their hands on a FOIA request recieved just the SS hotel rooms for a limited time. That is not the cost of the secure tent, the cost of WH staffers rooms, etc.

          • Joe in PA

            Exactly, we knew this shit 8 months ago. Good grief.

    • Just guessing that it’s now estimated Donald’s wasted hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars on his almost weekly golf vacations.

      Back in April, he’d already spent an estimated $80m.

      • Tread

        I bet the’ve found that not only his he wasting taxpayer dollars, but he’s also taking that money for himself.

    • Jean-Marc in Canada

      Perhaps his golf games should have their own CBO score.

  • txstevo

    This just woke my dog up from his nap

    • iambu

      I wonder how my cats would react, but I like my cats, so I’ll probably skip tormenting them. I already confuse them sometimes by playing sounds of cats meowing on my computer. They always look behind the computer for the cat that isn’t there. It’s pretty cute, but I try not to do it too much, hubs thinks it’s mean. Anyway, I hope your dog is Ok!

  • The Sentinel
    • ETownCanuck

      I was JUST about to post this, great minds think alike 🙂

    • Todd Allis

      The song holds up better than the video, though I like the video too.

    • MT YVR

      Is… that Dawn French?

      • Natty Enquirer

        It sure is. Hugh Laurie is in it as well.

        • MT YVR

          Annnnnnd now I’ve fallen down the rabbit hole of going over the Kate Bush albums I have… AUGH. lol

    • Todd Allis

      I didn’t even play it, but the song is stuck in my head now.

  • Astro

    Nothing about what’s being reported makes sense with how we know sound works. Even the reports about what each person allegedly says they experienced are all different which means that a single physical cause is very unlikely. It has all the hallmarks of mass hysteria.

  • Mike C

    It’s transparently designed to stir up needless nonsense between the US and Cuba that I don’t believe for a moment Cuba had anything to do with this. It’s positively Russian. Give me a break…

    • Jean-Marc in Canada

      Exactly. This benefits Russia, not Cuba.

    • Halou

      I suspect that Cuba is well aware of who is doing it and why but have been bent over a barrel as it were, if they do anything to stop these attacks then, perhaps, their loans get called in and that would likely force them into bankruptcy and a severe recession.

      Reports from December last year suggest that they are so short on cash they want to pay off $270 million of their debt with an increase in export volumes, primarily rum.
      http://money.cnn.com/2016/12/16/news/cuba-rum-debt-czech-republic/index.html

  • JCF

    I’ll take y’all’s word for it. Gonna pass on listening (my hearing and mental health is under enough stressors as it is!)

    • Princess Lardass

      Everyday I wake up, the first thing I think is “What’s he tweeted/said/done now?”

    • bambinoitaliano

      Don’t click. I had to quickly delete the tab feeling dizzy just listening for a few seconds. It’s not helping when I am dealing with some minor lightheadedness lately.

      • JCF

        I’m in Northern California, breathing smoke the past few days: BELIEVE ME, I understand the feeling lightheaded (fatigued, nauseous) thing!

    • stuckinthewoods

      Don’t bother playing it. It was just the Beatles’ Revolution 9 backwards.

  • zhera

    If they think people have been injured by this noise, why are they releasing it to the public? This makes absolutely no sense!

    • AmeriCanadian

      The amount of exposure (time and/or amplitude) is what matters. You won’t damage your hearing by listening to a snippet of sound at a controllable volume. But if you were to play it at full blast 24/7, then yes, you would probably suffer some damage.

    • Lumpy Gaga

      Pure speculation: If the audible part of it is not what’s doing the damage, then the audible part should be a known entity, so that the person who hears it does not dismiss it as annoying but harmless stupid white noise from a light bulb or appliance.

  • Professor Barnhardt

    I don’t know what app they’re using. From 0:58 of the video, there appear to be about 11.5 spikes from about 5,980 hertz (5.98 kHz) to about 8,000 hertz (8.0 kHz). That’s a spike every 175 or so hertz. That’s an odd multiple, but there’s some reason for it.

    • Tulle Christensen

      The decibels of the sounds is not enough to be anything but slightly annoying at the frequencies shown

      • Natty Enquirer

        We have no idea how loud the sound was in the field from a recording of unknown gain.

  • Jean-Marc in Canada

    Thing is, this is similar to what the U.S. did in Panama and subjected many inmates in Guantanamo to. I merely point this out because if the U.S. sees no issue with subjecting other humans to this, it’s hard for me to shed tears or show concern. Sauce for the goose as it were.

    That said, it’s probably the Russians; I don’t see an upside for the Cubans to do this.

  • greenmanTN

    That sound, just the part we CAN hear, would drive me insane. Certain pitches make me so tense and uncomfortable, almost like a physical pain, that I can lash out verbally or even physically if I can’t get away from them. Nearly all the music I listen to is bass/persuasion heavy due to that.

    Low subsonic sounds are known to cause hallucinations, even seeing “apparitions.”

    • AmeriCanadian

      Subsonic sounds are believed to be the cause of the panic experienced by the Dyatlov Pass hikers in 1959.

    • Tulle Christensen

      yea subsonic sound waves can make your brain hit your skull, it is kinda like being a football player or being in a car accident

      • Ann Kah

        After a head injury I suffered ear problems, and the one that I hate the most is a sound-balanced commentary on a sporting event. The commentator speaks and the crowd noises are subdued, and when he stops the roar of the crowd returns with a jolt that hits my ears with a percussive thud.

    • John30013

      I have a niece with a condition that sounds similar to what you’re describing, called (I think) dysphonia. She is using cognitive behavioral therapy to deal with it. For her it is rustling or chewing sounds that set her off, and it is often most intense when those sounds are coming from her mother (my sister).

    • Duh-David

      Crying babies used to drive me nuts, too. But, only, maybe, one in a hundred. I’m convinced that babies spend their first days crying through various pitches until they find the one that gets to their parents. If a baby hits your pitch, you have to stop the crying. We are designed to be sensitive to certain frequencies.

    • Ann Kah

      I played a CD in the car of Philip Glass music with a very deep bass line – then realized that it was vibrating the rear-view mirrors severely, both inside and outside.

  • ByronK

    Maybe they’re high frequency, high-speed broadcasts of Trump’s speeches.

    • Pip

      Normal frequency and speed of his speeches can make me feel pretty sick, so this is a pretty sound theory.

  • David in Tucson

    If I turn up the speakers a bit, I can hear that sound clearly. It’s up in the range for pipe organ mixture pipes, but it’s discordant, not harmonics related to each other. If I had to hear it for any length of time, it would drive me bonkers.

    • Ann Kah

      It would send me into the basement to lubricate the fans in the AC…

  • Natty Enquirer
    • Lumpy Gaga

      “Entry’s forbidden.” — something that bottom said to no one IRL, ever.

  • fkevin

    I wonder if the whole thing is BS. A way to roll back relations established during the Obama administration.

  • Lumpy Gaga

    This weaponized audio has been brought to you by the same people who mastered the latest David Bowie box set.

  • Jay Mills

    I rate this alongside reports of mobile chemical weapon units in Iraq. Classic CIA BS.

  • Halou

    What does “mass hysteria” mean in this context?
    And why is it only occurring among US diplomatic staff? If it were not a targeted attack then there would be significant numbers of Cuban civilians living or working in the vicinity likewise affected by “mass hysteria”.

    • Mikey

      apparently some Canadian staff at the Canadian embassy have also been affected.

  • Tomcat

    I guess my ears are exempt from this sound. I hear nothing.

    • Tomcat

      However I have heard what sounds like cicadas for years now.
      I am told it is tinnitus.

  • Steve Smith

    If the USA wants to pay me a lot of money to work in Cuba I’ll do it. My hearing loss is so advanced that I couldn’t hear anything at all! I can lipread the announcer, though. I have tinnitus, too, but I can manage to ignore it, though it gets bad if I go anywhere noisy or take a flight. I’ve an appointment next week with a specialist to see about some possible implant surgery. Otherwise, I’m getting used to a silent world.

  • Tom Mears

    This sounds like those sonic squirrel and mouse scare things. We are going to have a lot of egg on our face if it tuns out the Embassy janitor bought a dozen of them at the Havana Home Depot 😉

    We put one in our garage years ago to get rid of squirrels, the squirrels didn’t care but it drove us nuts. We chucked it after about an hour.

  • houstonray

    I’m not 100% that this isn’t something Trump has covertly ordered (or perhaps an op off the books) in an effort to undermine the thaw in US/Cuba relations. Interesting that Trump has not mentioned it or talked about it. You’d think he would use this to pump up his base.

    I’m just sayin…..

  • Mark

    I have friends who are in Cuba at the moment. This is their 3rd trip and they love it! Wonderful people and open and embracing them. To me, this just smacks of Russia. What would Cuba have to gain from this. I do NOT trust this government in DC at all.

  • paulrees100

    Canadian diplomats and their families were also affected.
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/cuba-sound-attacks-recording-1.4352118

  • SDG

    Like tinnitus!

  • Grumpy Old Man

    Well, DUH! Talk with bat scientists, elephant scientists, alligator & crocodile scientists; they have been working with sounds above and below human hearing for years. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qNf9nzvnd1k
    It took about a minute before I was able hear the subsonics but I was able to hear almost to the top range in this test. GG https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/4095ee3196d1485da4abac834286fdabcbf8c7206c27089839d3688b62176da3.jpg was unimpressed. Now that others mentioned it – some of the range was very close to what I hear all the time (I stopped taking NSAIDs so the volume has decreased but fuck it is distracting.)

  • starskeptic

    No, this isn’t a recording of what was heard – it’s a recording of a sound that is reported to be what was heard.

  • TheManicMechanic

    Welcome to my daily world. Over a half century of loud music, racing cars, loud power tools, machinery, and 30-some years of working next to a major airport provide a similar soundtrack wherever I go. Honestly, I’m surprised my hearing is still as good as it is (I can still hear up to 19kHz), and some days are worse than others. I’ll find myself complaint about noise but realize the noise floor of my tinnitus has lowered below its usual level. Then there are rare days when it’s so loud I can’t get any rest.

  • Nashoba Darkwolf