FLORIDA: At Least Five Dead At Hollywood Nursing Home After Days Without Air Conditioning [VIDEO]

CBS News reports:

Five people are dead at a Florida nursing home that was evacuated early Wednesday after several days without power. Broward County Mayor Barbara Sharief said about 100 patients were evacuated from the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills early Wednesday and officials are working to relocate them to safety.

Three people were found dead at the nursing home and two others died after arriving at the hospital, Sharief said during a press conference Wednesday. Rescue crews arrived at facility shortly after 7:30 a.m. Aerial footage showed patients sitting outside in wheelchairs and others being taken out of the facility on stretchers.

At least 25 people died when Irma pounded the Southeast earlier this week, including 12 people in Florida. One person was found dead and three others were taken to the hospital for carbon monoxide poisoning in Daytona Beach, caused by fumes from a gas generator.

  • Tawreos

    When you know you have vulnerable people in your care steps should be taken to lessen their vulnerability. Going days without something you know they need is unacceptable.

    • David L. Caster

      This is an overwhelming disaster we are talking about here.

      • Tawreos

        It didn’t sneak up on them and this is not the first hurricane Florida has experienced. They should have contingency plans in place.

        • another_steve

          When you have human lives to look after, you do whatever’s humanly possible to keep them safe.

          The nursing home should have hired a private helicopter and air-lifted people out as soon as it became apparent that residents’ safety could be in jeopardy by leaving them there.

          • bambinoitaliano

            A private helicopter? I’m sure such facility is affordable by those posh nursing home. I doubt an average one could ill afford. Even if some of them do, they would not allow the option to cut into operating expenses, never mind the profit.

          • another_steve

            Penny wise, pound foolish. Airlifts could have saved lives and kept the nursing home in business. As it is today, lives were lost and the nursing home will lose 100 percent of its assets to the lawsuits.

          • bambinoitaliano

            Not disagreeing with you in regards to saving lives. You were saying something about the downside of capitalism the other day. The latest Equifax fiasco is not new. Enron, Tobacco company, Pharmaceutical company and the list goes on and on. Billion dollars worth of assets or not. Far too many companies are operating with short sighted mantra of “profit or bust”. They are betting something bad like this will not happen to them. Which unfortunately, more often then not they skate by. What ever the cause and consequences out of this nursing home, it will be business as usual given some time. This is capitalism of today.

          • another_steve

            I’m a small-government type of guy but I rely on government to ensure (through rules, regulations and laws) that businesses don’t jeopardize the public safety. You – businessperson – can make as much profit as the marketplace allows, but you may not jeopardize the public safety in the process of doing that. That includes everything from nursing homes to businesses responsible for purifying the water we drink.

            Pharmaceutical companies that charge exorbitant prices for medications are okay imo – provided there’s no suppression in any way of the ability of other companies to come in and charge less for the same medication.

            In such a case, I say let the free and open marketplace adjudicate the matter.

          • netxtown

            I don’t know about other states, but nursing homes here in Texas have a fabulous little loop-hole that keeps them out of court. Anyone suing over a ‘pre-mature’ death must be able to prove that the deceased had at least 2 years of quality life ahead of them. Obviously a lawmaker owned a nursing home – and needed some coverage for his ass, and wallet.

          • Vira

            I wonder what the Medicaid reimbursement for “Post-Hurricane Helicopter Evacuation” is.

          • ColdCountry

            Bingo!

      • Lumpy Gaga

        Just at the site, I’m sure. No power means no food, no laundry, no refrigeration of meds… I know I can go five days without doing laundry, but a nursing home?

        • Todd20036

          Portable generators do exist, and a nursing home contains residents who need electricity to run things like breathing machines and dialysis machines.

          Also, when you are healthy, no air conditioning in hot weather is a real pain in the ass, but if you are ill, that can be fatal.

          And I’m not even a doctor.

          • Ragnar Lothbrok

            I wonder if Ben Carson knows this ?

          • Lumpy Gaga

            They chose to immigrate to that nursing home.

          • Todd20036

            I’m sure he read a poverb or two about it.

          • Robincho

            Haven’t heard much if anything about Stabby lately, which I find disturbing…

          • bambinoitaliano

            Shhhhhh no one wakes him up.

          • Lumpy Gaga

            But there is definitely some stabbing to be done.

          • Steverino

            It is hidden in a poverb from Klingon Jesus.

          • rednekokie

            I would be surprised if he does — and even more surprised if he knew anything about what to to regarding it.

          • TheManicMechanic

            He just asks Klingon Jesus.

          • Lumpy Gaga

            I’m not defending the people running the home. I was just ruminating on how the definition of “necessity” changes from situation to situation.

          • Todd20036

            Sorry if my comment came off as criticizing you, I was merely expanding on it.
            I totally agree with you

          • bambinoitaliano

            It’s not uncommon to hear about physical abuses from nursing homes let alone getting away with operating standard. I’m afraid what should be is not what it is in many nursing homes not just in Florida but everywhere as well.

          • -M-
          • marachne

            Most nursing homes won’t accept someone on a vent, and dyalisis is done at dyalisis centers. But regular O2 does need power, and many meds need refrigeration or at least cool dry temps. Beds are powered, wound vacs are powered, many wheelchairs, pumps for IV medications…and yes tolerating extreme temps when already weakened.

          • Beagle

            Dialysis depends on the nursing home. My sister-in-law was in and out of nursing homes for the last two years of her life. After her kidneys failed, she was sometimes in a facility that had in-house dialysis.

          • ColdCountry

            They probably had generators, but not enough capacity to run everything. It is very expensive to have all the equipment to cover worst case scenarios, and most businesses will gamble. In this case, the patients were the losers.

    • another_steve

      And it’s not like they didn’t have advance warning.

      After the lawsuits, that nursing home will be no more.

    • skyweaver

      This is true of us as a nation, taking care of your most vulnerable is the hallmark of a great nation. Which is one of many reasons why Republicans should not be in charge anymore.

    • ColdCountry

      I’m sure they had generators, but ac pulls a lot of power, and they probably didn’t have enough capacity to cool the entire facility. But they should have.

      • Beagle

        Or at least cooled what they could, and moved as many people as possible into the area that they could keep cool.

  • Lumpy Gaga

    RIP.

  • liondon#iamnotatraitor

    Nursing home are bare bones..they probably couldn’t afford a generator.

    • Blake Jordan

      And the rethuglicans what to take even more money away from them…

      • bkmn

        One of Trump’s big donor runs a whole chain of nursing homes.

        • 2guysnamedjoe

          For-profit nursing homes should be the exception rather than the rule.

    • Ragnar Lothbrok

      Aren’t most homes private and for profit ?

      • Rex

        Many are not-for-profit, and are more likely to offer better quality of care.

        • marachne

          Most are for-profit, as is most healthcare these days (including hospitals). Another broken aspect of our broken system

      • Rex

        This particular nursing home is for profit.

    • Paula

      They probably pulled the emergency generator and sold it for a loss so they could get a tidy little tax write off.

    • 2guysnamedjoe

      They’re bare-bones because their owners are taking in huge profits.

      • liondon#iamnotatraitor

        Regulations are job killers….AMIRIGHT?

    • Rex

      Did some googling – the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills is a FOR PROFIT nursing home.

  • Paula

    Did the people running this facility say anything to the authorities? Like maybe getting some emergency help.

    • Todd20036

      A better question than even that is, why did an adult care facility lack the necessary generators to keep the place running for a week or two?

      • Paula

        I was wondering about that, too. I can’t imagine that they didn’t have an emergency generator. Maybe, it was damaged, ran out of fuel after that many days, or was not large enough to run the AC system.
        Regardless, they should have said something after a couple of days,
        I am sure arrangements could have been made to move the residents.

        • William

          A generator big enough to run medical equipment and the AC would likely run on propane, and have a huge propane storage tank. The tank would have to be filled, of course.

          • Paula

            When I checked the Alzheimer’s unit my mom was in, I asked about emergency procedures. They showed me the generator. It was a huge diesel powered unit about the size of a full size van.

        • GayOldLady

          Hospital systems in FL are overrun right now with patients who’ve been transferred in from smaller facilities without power. My daughter is in senior management with a major hospital system and she was telling me horror stories last night about their hospitals in FL and one of the other large hospital systems with similar stories. She said people were feigning illness just to get into a hospital so they could have access to A/C and more comfortable living conditions.

  • bkmn

    As a reminder Trump reversed Obama’s executive order that made it easier to sue nursing home for abuse. I would think subjecting vulnerable seniors to extreme temps would qualify as abuse.

    • Ragnar Lothbrok

      How many of those MAGA nuts even know this ?

      • bambinoitaliano

        The one that knew it are either dead or they will selectively blame something else.

        • Ragnar Lothbrok

          Obama!!?!?

          • bambinoitaliano

            Hillary, the gays. Take your pick πŸ˜›

  • Ragnar Lothbrok

    Regulations that would be required in these kinds of facilities could have saved these folks.
    ( Elevated of course )
    Too bad regulations are job killers huh.

  • I just got power back this morning in South Palm Beach County. Florida Power and Light promised power back to everyone on the East side of Florida by Sunday except for extreme cases.

    • Hank

      Edddi, glad to hear from you. I figured you were without electricity, considering the area. I hope, that you did not sustain any significant damage. BiilBear has made a list of Floridians here, and we are watching for everyone to check in. HE will be very happy to know, that you are OK!!!!

      • Yes, I am OK – so is Mom in her senior place. Frightening. We lost a few of our gorgeous old trees but not as much damage as in the Keys or Jacksonville. Here is a video of how gorgeous Delray Beach has handled the storm if anyone wants to come visit — https://youtu.be/n3KgOcI4O8I

        • Hank

          Eddi, I am very glad to hear. I was not sure if your mother was still around. I am glad, that she is OK, as well. The video, is similar to what little I have seen, here in FTL. (We both dodged a VERY big bullet.) My condo lost some trees, other than that all came through intact.

          My only loss was Comcast service. ATT and Verizon are foregoing data overages for now. So, my iPhone is my HotSpot to allow me to use the internet. (I called ATT twice to confirm.) At night, I am streaming MSNBC Live on my laptop, to keep up with the news. Streaming eats up data like crazy!!! I keep getting texts from ATT that they are adding 1 GB for $15, which lasts about an hour while streaming.

          A friend of mine, lives N of Tampa in New Port Richey. She is fine, but lost electricity. Who knows in a rural area, how long she will not have power.

  • Ninja0980

    Don’t forget, Trump has made it harder to sue nursing homes for stuff like this.
    The owners of the nursing home will likely walk away without having to pay a dime.

  • Texndoc

    Similar to post Katrina where a woman physician was accused of “facilitating the deaths” of some terminally ill hospice patients by possibly over medicating. She was part of the skeleton staff that stayed. Was she the most evil person there or the most humane, alleviating their suffering. Can’t remember how that turned out.

    ETA:”In 2006, a Louisiana judge found probable cause to order the arrest of Pou and two nurses for second degree murder in the deaths of several of the patients, following a nearly year-long investigation by the office of Louisiana Attorney General Charles Foti. However, a grand jury in Orleans Parish refused to indict Pou on any of the counts. Eventually, the charges were expunged and the State of Louisiana paid Pou’s legal fees.”

    • Ross

      She was accused.

      But there was no proof.

      • UrsusArctos

        Once the facts on the ground came to light, the attitude pf the non-involved people rising hell quoted down quickly. Baptist was a hospice where the staff made most of the right moves but hadn’t prepared for what Katrina brought them.

  • Paula

    Mom, they kilt great grandma Sally Joe!!
    Its O.K. honey. They made a nice profit for it.
    MAGA!

    • Todd20036

      Cool! Let’s eat Grandma!

  • NPR had a story about this this week – Florida nursing homes were up and running during Irma — by law they have to have emergency power backup. Here is the link. http://www.npr.org/2017/09/12/550492804/florida-nursing-homes-stay-up-and-running-amid-power-outages

  • John Ruff

    More reasons to avoid the sunshine state.

  • Tomcat

    I do not know the facts around this nursing home so I won’t subject them to ridicule.
    I am sure the facts will be coming shortly from a different source.

    • Tomcat

      I will say this, 98 out of 103 lived and that is good.

  • Harveyrabbit

    So are the scamgelicals going to thank Jebus for that too?

    • MBear

      All part of gods mysterious plan blah blah blah

    • Tomcat

      Guaranteed they will say they are in a better place.

      • Ragnar Lothbrok

        Then they should go too

  • GayOldLady

    We don’t know all the details yet, but in the interim I will assume that the Staff did everything within their power to protect these patients. We should remember that prior to the hurricane that hospitals will not take these people unless their doctors refer them to a hospital. Many of these patients have families who obviously did not show up to protect them and the nurses and techs who stayed, put their own lives at risk to do so. Many of these people are terminally ill with dementia and other ailments and keeping them alive in conditions of extreme heat and deprivation is a monumental task. Until we get the details we should give these nurses and techs the benefit of the doubt

    • Tomcat

      I agree, we should reserve judgement or not judge at all.

    • Natty Enquirer

      That is quite possibly true. However, it remains the duty of the proprietors to safeguard the lives of those entrusted to their care. And they may pay for their lapse if they cannot show that circumstances were beyond their control (and not just on the wrong side of the ledger).

      • Silver Badger

        In a perfect world, yes. In our world elderly neglect is very commonplace.

        • UrsusArctos

          So is failure of imagination. People think they’re doing everything right only to land in what was obviously avoidable in hindsight.

      • GayOldLady

        Well, there is a criminal investigation, as there is with any unusual death, but you have to remember that the majority of the people in these facilities are extremely fragile and it doesn’t take much for their lives to end. And the truth is that too many families walk away from these people without giving them a second thought, but they will be the first to bring a lawsuit against the facility when things don’t go well. Human beings run these facilities, not robots and the work they do is extremely difficult. I’ve known many nurses and techs who’ve dedicated their lives to doing this work and it is thankless work for meager pay.

        • marachne

          I would hesitate to lay too much universal blame on families – if they are not local (and we’re talking Florida – how many moved there, away from family at retirement?) it can be extremely difficult to manage care from a distance.

          • GayOldLady

            Some folks do care for their elderly in nursing homes, but too many don’t. My experience has been that most of the staff in nursing homes are caring, loving people who are underappreciated. Of course there are exceptions, but not many.

          • marachne

            My research is around family caregivers. There a lot more that care than don’t – and do everything they can to keep family out of NHs. This is called a rehab facility, which means the majority are there 20 days or less. (Medicare covers 20 days only)

          • GayOldLady

            I’m anxious to hear the details of this story. This particular center is a Long term care Nursing Home facility & rehab. It has long term residents. It is across the street from Hollywood Memorial Regional Hospital. There’s also a Senior behavioral care facility next door.

          • marachne

            You are absolutely right that we are remiss in making assumptions with limited facts. I did not know that it was LTC and rehab, or what was in the neighborhood. Does make me wonder what, if any direction staff were given by those higher up the food chain.

          • OldGuy

            For several years I flew 1,000 miles at least every three months to visit my mother in an elder care home. Which, by the way, I shopped for for over a year (a truly disheartening chore). I was floored when several of the wonderful staff told me that I visited far more often than family members of patients who lived in the immediate area.

            One bit of advice, shop for your own care home ahead of time, the good ones usually have waiting lists. Hopefully you will never have to check in, but better to be prepared.. Also, 99% of the time, family will make cost the first priority!

          • GayOldLady

            You were a good son. I kept both my parents at home. They both died of cancer and required a lot of care. My wife is a nurse and she helped, but I provided most of their day to day care, bathing, meals, meds, etc. It was difficult to work and to care for my parents and during the process I came to really appreciate the work associated with care giving. My wife and I both have planned our care. We hope to be able to stay at home, but the best laid plans as the saying goes.

          • GayOldLady

            And I know people who’ve relocated their elderly parent/s into nursing homes near their own homes. You don’t have to leave your elderly parent/s in a nursing home 1000 miles away just because that’s where they once lived.

          • marachne

            True, most family caregivers live within 10 miles of their family. But it’s a lot more complex than just moving someone. Nor an exact parallel, but when my mom thought about moving into a CCRC (independent through NH community), she decided that moving to where I lived was a no go, and even moving from Silverlake to the west valley (where the nice Jewish place was) in the L.A. area wasn’t attractive.

            Again, frail maybe, but not necessarily without decisional capacity esp. in rehab. And forcing someone to uproot can be challenging – leave their friends and routine?

            Also, caregiver health is another factor. I had a study participant who was 83, with a 103 y.o. mom and a 63 y.o. daughter who both had serious health issues, and she was trying to take care of both and was having problems of her own.

            I’m not denying the reality you describe, just wary of sweeping statements.

          • Cipher

            One big motivating issue, sadly, is medicaid qualification. Most states allow for an exemption for homes owned in that state. So… Son lives in Massachusetts, mother retired to Florida and has her home there. If son brings her up to Massachusetts, the full value of the home in Florida is calculated with no exemption. Mass will require that the value of the home be spent down before Mom qualifies for medicaid in Massachusetts. The result: son leaves Mom in a nursing home in Florida.

            It’s evil that financial motivation results in these decisions but there you have it! Nobody wants to talk about these issues and people don’t know how to plan for this until it’s too late.

          • Dwight Williamson

            It may sound cruel but if proper transfer of assets is done , all parties can enjoy enjoy more freedom and peace of mind. Of course that said, it must be done completely to the letter of the law.

          • Cipher

            True. The look- back period always shocks people. Sound planning is necessary (and costly). So many families have no clue and just assume that MedicARE takes care of all expenses for everyone over 65.

          • Vira

            This is pretty blithe. I am observing family members who are attempting to do just that: move elderly and declining parents to a nursing/assisted living facility closer to them so that they can more easily check on and care for them. The issue is that the parents do not WANT to be uprooted from their community, where they have family ties and cultural roots; they don’t want to move into a strange facility, cared for by strangers, far from anything resembling home that they’ve ever known. The parents realize and acknowledge that they can no longer continue to live in their home, even with daily nursing care, and that they need to move into a full-time residential care facility. But they (the parents) want to stay close to home, which is a rural area where they were born and have spent their entire lives; they would have to be moved against their will to an urban area to be closer to the adult child who would be responsible for their care.

            Yes, sometimes you DO have to consider and even yield to the wishes of the person requiring care. To do otherwise would be cruel.

            And then a natural disaster of historic proportions can occur, and rain down all manner of unforeseen consequences. Guilting the children who had to make tough decision in extremely difficult circumstances is shameful.

          • GayOldLady

            I don’t know the exact percentage, but I’d say that a sizable number of people in nursing homes don’t really care where they’re at because they’re suffering from some sort of dementia or severe illness that makes them incapable of making good, informed decisions about their best interest. And as a person who cared for both parents until their deaths and as a person in their 70’s, assisting in the care of my wife’s 93 year old mother, the time comes when the care of the person isn’t the decision of the person being cared for, it is the decision of the family. It’s a sad fact of life that if we live to be too old most of us lose our capacity for good decision making and consequently lose our freedoms.

        • Dwight Williamson

          My family has lived in Florida since 1950. This is a first. Irma continues to dog us as she did from the first day she formed. We have had to play chess for water, gasoline , building supplies and debris hauling. We are the lucky ones. . In Orlando 27 schools are closed for a lack of electricity for the near future. When all is said and done Irma was a bitch, is a bitch and will continue to dog us as we rebuild for years. All human life is precious. All I can say is power failures require generators. Every health care facility has a defibrillator, a law must be passed for electrical availability 24/7 for all health care facilities.

    • UrsusArctos

      Knowing someone firsthand who dealt with this exact situation first hand during Katrina which didn’t make national news, I’d say you hit the nail on the head. There were TWO “nursing home” incidents during Katrina that made headlines but all facilities that had patients had unbelievable circumstances to deal with and most did admirably even if in some cases they failed. St Rita nursing home in St Bernard parish was totally flooded killing many residents. They relied on the USCoE having built proper levees and a history of never flooding. Because it was a small facility, the owners were prosecuted/persecuted.
      The situation at Baptist that got national attention failed to make the most important point. That “nursing home” was a hospice where nursing staff manually ventilated patients for DAYS in extreme heat with no outside help. That facility was presumed safe because it was in a relatively high area and the patients were on the 10-12th floor. Moving many of the ones who died may have had the same result because of their condition. The evacuation route out after power failed was torturous and they were unable to move some of the patients.
      The question of euthanasia vs murder vs assisted suicide was aired publicly for a long time in NOLA. Once more of the facts of the situation became clear, the attitude toward the staff from most people shifted to “that could have been me saddled with something no human should have to deal with”.

      • marachne

        The majority of MY staff are under paid, trained, staffed….and mostly POC (often immigrants). They work hard and often with a lot of caring. And shit rolls down hill. Those with the money and power are not those on the ground trying to take care of the patients. Many NH/rehab facilities/ ALFs are controlled by real estate conglomerates and/or venture capitalists. The real estate is the only thing they care about. Patients? Staff? Pfft

        • William

          The corporation may pay a fine. The workers are the ones who could be prosecuted.

          • caphillprof

            And yet it is the corporation, as the responsible party, which should be prosecuted and its charter suspended

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    • boatboy_srq

      Mustn’t forget also that FL DCF looks askance at family members taking any action, because there’s the presumption that relatives can’t provide the levels of care the NH/ALF/hospice can. Pulling an elder out of care for whatever reason is risky both for the elder and for the relation/caregiver: the former because any change can be traumatic and the latter due to the scrutiny they’re under. Families who “obviously did not show up to protect them” may have been too frightened of DCF adverse actions against them to take action themselves.

    • netxtown

      Agree. The nurses and techs were there smack in all of it. I would suspect they were there because they did care. OTOH – contingency plans are the responsibility of management/owners.

      OT but not: Many, many companies who are fully dependent on their computer systems do NOT have adequate contigency plans in case of a disaster. Disaster Recovery is not all that complicated but it is DAMNED expensive. Studies show that in most cases, a large business has less than 6 days to be fully functional – or go down the tube. Still, very few have spent the money for the infrastructure to ensure their survival. It’s a gamble they are willing to take…..which sounds all too familiar to the above…

    • Willys41

      Myself, I’m a little bit cynical, so I’m more inclined to assume that anyone in a position of responsibility in any kind of a corporate enterprise just doesn’t give a flying f*ck about anything or anybody except their own 401K.

      Sure, I could be wrong. A lot of the time I’m not.

      • UrsusArctos

        There are many levels of responsibility in a situation like this. Unfortunately the penalties and blame often fall to those who are hands on, in place, doing the best they can with what is in front of them. The people who set things up so clients and employees were placed in an untenable situation should have to pay a steep price.

    • Ross

      Well said.

    • Grumpy Old Man

      Unfortunately, the staff did not do anything. the home is across the street from a hospital that had emergency power and no one made the effort to move them. The director of the hospital across the street runs the nursing home. From the MiamiHerald.com:
      “The Florida Agency for Healthcare Administration gave the home a
      health-inspection rating of β€œmuch below average,” the Miami Herald
      reported. The state lists Dr. Jack Michel, of South Miami, as the
      company’s manager. He is also the president of Larkin Community
      Hospital, across from the nursing home and that apparently never lost
      power. In 2006, the U.S. Justice Department fined Larkin and its owners
      $15.4 million in the settlement of a civil fraud complaint.
      Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/opinion/editorials/article173219406.html#storylink=cpy

    • gothambear

      very well said

  • Ken M

    Bum, bum, bum, bum….bum, bum, bum, bum, buuuuuum. And the lawsuits staaaart. You get the idea. : )

  • CB

    Why this facility had no back-up generators boggles the mind. Well, it doesn’t, profit. #MAGA

    • Tomcat

      Who said they did NOT? Wait for the facts. Sometimes things happen.

  • RaygunsGoZap

    This is horrible. Why aren’t Miss Milo and Frau Coulter cracking jokes on Twitter? Have I misjudged what they contribute?

    • grindstone

      They were mildly inconvenienced, which is MUCH worse, doncha know?

  • Tomcat

    Most businesses that have generators also have IN GROUND fuel tanks.
    And some times shit happens that causes water to get in the fuel.
    It happened one year at a hospital I worked at and the generator was useless until we could bring in a repair team and a fuel truck to hook up to.

    • marachne

      Along the same lines as new rules telling hospitals to get their back up power sources out of the basement? (Major problem with both Sandy and Katrina). Needing to harden emergency responses against ocean rise

      • Kelly Lape

        What ocean rise? Trump says climate change is a hoax. Nothing to sea here… move along. move along.

      • there are not a lot of basements in Florida.

        • marachne

          I understand, what I’m referring to is the need to rethink backup emergency responses because of the complications of climate change. Think about that chemical plant outside Houston. Multiple backups, none flood proof

        • Cipher

          True. Ground floors flood there and roofs suffer damage and destruction. So design and build accordingly for the backup systems. Of course, we could be talking about advanced solar and wind for site generation, but we have the oil company stooges in control.

  • Tomcat

    By the way be careful where you get gas after a hurricane you might get water instead of gas. Most tanks are below ground.

  • bandanajack

    the dim newscaster wondered why this was a criminal investigation, did someone tamper with the acs. NO dipshit, staff is supposed to prevent these deaths. criminal abuse and neglect is what is being investigated…

    • GayOldLady

      And as you know, not a few people in nursing homes are being kept alive via artificial means who with lack of power and resources would not last long. It’s not uncommon for people to die in nursing homes. After all nursing homes are where people go when they are no longer mentally and or physically able to function without help. Nursing homes are not assisted living. They are 24/7/365 care and often bedside care.

      • Silver Badger

        At least they’re supposed to be. To many, a nursing home is a warehouse for people, waiting to die. Shudder. Spent several a few years working in nursing homes back in the dawn of time.

        • GayOldLady

          My wife is a nurse and worked in a NH for quite a few years. She loved her patients like family and grieved for them when they passed. Some had families who cared and visited, but many of them didn’t. She tried to give the patients without family special attention because she knew it was the only attention they got.

          • Cipher

            Some of the best of humanity can be seen in Nursing Homes. Truly special, caring people, underpaid and overworked. Our damned culture and its obsession with youth…

          • greenmanTN

            Full respect to all legitimate caregivers, but my grandmother was molested in in a NH. At first we thought when she’d say that her (dead) husband came to visit her the night before and they had sex she was just showing signs of dementia. She wasn’t, though she had the identity of her visitor confused. She wasn’t the only one he was doing it to.

          • GayOldLady

            Abuse happens to vulnerable people of all ages because there are evil people in the world. Fortunately most caregivers aren’t abusers. I hope the person who abused your loved one got the maximum penalty under the law.

      • bandanajack

        which begs the question, where was the support staff, any staff?

  • Kelly Lape

    I see a lot of speculation but not a lot of facts in the comments (so far). Did the facility have a generator? Was it large enough? Did it fail?

    If you’ve ever been in a facility with a “backup” generator when the power fails, did it auto start in your facility? If it hadn’t auto-started would you know what to do?

    As for “calling authorities” – when did the first call get placed? On Sunday “Hi this is a nursing home, no one is dead yet, but it’s hot here” – With all the destruction how do you make that “priority” call?

    • Jerry Kott

      It is very true that all the facts are not in. This is a disaster zone and the disaster is not over. I vaguely recall a story about some brave entry level Health Care providers during Katrina who stayed with nursing home residents to the rescue.

  • Ken M

    O/T In a Hump/Hunk Ginger mood https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CA5_wdFWgAAGYIP.jpg needed a break after the previous story. )

    • Silver Badger

      Yes. Today seems to be one of “those” days. Hopefully, things will get a bit more up beat as the day progresses.

  • rednekokie

    Please don’t tell me that anyone at all is the least surprised in this!!!

  • Xiao Ai: The Social Gadfly

    I give to you, those who would leave their pet to fend for themselves.

    • Karl Dubhe

      Erm, there’s a bit of a difference. πŸ™‚

      • Xiao Ai: The Social Gadfly

        Oh, I’m not talking about the people stranded there. I’m referring to the ones that kept them there.

  • safari
  • Willys41

    Well I’m glad they did something before all the patients dropped dead. Obviously that would be a big hit on their revenue stream.

  • RJ Bone

    πŸ™ My mother-in-law died in a nursing home. She was bounced around between facilities because they weren’t being paid for long term care and the only way she could have more was if she was moved. We really feel that it was the lack of continuity/consistency of care (I think that’s the term) that partially led to her eventual death. The worst part was that she was found dead and she was alone, in the end.

    Her nickname was “The Dragon” because she smoked and could be very… grumpy. She had a bad history with My Better Half (abandonment), but in her later years they had a better chance to bond and, well, Katy believes strongly in forgiveness.

    That said, we swear to this day that she chose my birthday to go into the hospital and our anniversary to finally pass on. She’d do that to finally get even for the one time I told her to get out during a visit and because she had that sense of humor πŸ˜›

    But just… all alone (her roommates were nearly comatose), but at least mostly out of it.

    That said, while I feel neglect also had something to do with it, I have known people who worked in care facilities who were beautiful people – my ex’s mom – who didn’t tolerate others mistreating the residents, so they do exist – it just seems that we hear stories like this a bit too often.

  • ColdCountry

    My sympathy goes out, not only to the friends and family of the deceased, but to the caregivers. Most of those people likely worked their hearts out to care for and protect their patients, and to not be able to save them must have been crushing.

  • BeaverTales

    It’s September…about a week before fall and people are dying without A/C outside of death valley?. Has climate change gotten so bad in the tropics?

    I’m saddened that this seems like a preventable loss of life, even if they didn’t have a backup generator. Where I live, medical and quasi-medical facilities all seem to have them in the event of a sufficiently large earthquake, which occurs once in a generation or two in places with population centers.

    Living in Alaska, it’s harder to understand why some people flock to a climate where they need air conditioning merely to survive. If we had an electrical or gasoline disruption here in an Alaska nursing home (we call them pioneer homes, and they’ve been around since statehood in most communities) we would bundle up in blankets, huddle together and build a fire until we could be rescued. Survival for a week would be fairly easy in an intact and ventilated wood stove heated building, even in a blizzard.

    It would be unpleasant but the point is that you don’t need electricity to survive for a week in a cold to temperate climate. I suppose the winters here have gotten milder while the subtropical summers in the sun belt are worse. I’d be scared to retire there after reading this.

    Before someone is offended, I’m not saying people shouldn’t live there, but I don’t understand how it could be so hot that you could die merely if you weren’t in constant air conditioning. I’ve only visited Florida once. Don’t people have the ability to wear a wet blanket to cool off? Is there no safety in groups? What an awful way to die.

    • Beagle

      I grew up in Wisconsin, went to college in New Orleans from 1980 to 1984 — so, before climate change really became noticed. I can still remember hearing a radio DJ talk about “a beautiful spring day — current temperature, 80 degrees.” Temperatures at the end of September could easily approach 90 degrees.
      On the other side of the coin, Southerners couldn’t understand why anyone would want to live where snow is a routine fact of winter and not a reason to freak out.

      • BeaverTales

        Snow isn’t lethal if you are in your house, and a significant number of people here voluntarily live off the grid in “dry cabins” with no gas, no running water or sometimes no electricity, for years. Our indigenous populations did it for thousands of years when the cold was more extreme than it is today.

        I grew up in California (25-30 yrs ago) and a 90 degree day was somewhat rare. We kids/young adults could stripdown to t-shirts and shorts/undies and it was fine…especially if we doused ourselves with water.

        I just can’t imagine dying after only a couple of days of it. We get carbon monoxide poisoning tragedies here too.

        • Karl Dubhe

          If your house is well insulated, and if you have food, and if you have heat/cooking, and you have sanitation; then snow isn’t lethal if you’re in a house in the north.

          Otherwise, kiss your ass goodbye. In this century or 5+ millennia ago. πŸ™ It’s easier to survive in the south, that’s always been true.

    • Cipher

      It’s hot and HUMID. A lot of people have COPD or breathing issues. You can cool the core temperature with water but the lungs have problems with that kind of air. So sad.

      • BeaverTales

        In all fairness, it’s a vulnerable population that doesn’t have a lot of years left.

  • That_Looks_Delicious

    Never run a generator indoors. I always think everybody knows that, but then you keep reading stories like this.

    • E.J.

      The morning news stated that the generator was outside, but too close to a window (they didn’t say if the window was open)

    • JCF

      Or, in cold weather, a gas-powered space heater.

  • Halou

    Remember that Joel Olsteen refused to open his church, more than adequate for emergencies, to people like this who need it. And Trump Jr attempted to defend the closure of mar-a-lago to ‘internally displaced persons’.