JAPAN: Nuclear Plant To Dump Waste Into Ocean

Newsweek reports:

Toxic waste produced by one of the world’s worst nuclear disasters will be dumped into the sea, according to the head of the Japanese company tasked with cleaning up the radioactive mess, despite protests from local fishermen.

Takashi Kawamura, chairman of Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), told foreign media that nearly 777,000 tons of water tainted with tritium, a byproduct of the nuclear process that is notoriously difficult to filter out of water, will be dumped into the Pacific Ocean as part of a multibillion-dollar recovery effort following the Fukushima nuclear disaster in 2011.

More from UPI:

Technology has so far been unable to remove tritium from the water, and TEPCO’s solution is to pour the radioactive liquid into the ocean, where, according to the utility’s officials, it would be quickly diluted, The Telegraph reported Friday.

Aileen Mioko-Smith, an anti-nuclear activist, told The Telegraph the “authorities should have been able to devise a way to remove the tritium instead of simply announcing that they are going to dump it into the ocean.”

“They say that it will be safe because the ocean is large so it will be diluted, but that sets a precedent that can be copied, essentially permitting anyone to dump nuclear waste into our seas,” she added.

  • What could possibly go wrong?

    /s

    • Amanda B. Rekendwith
      • Reality.Bites
      • Treant

        Mutation has never been so cute!

        • David Walker

          Jack (died a year ago today) had a Godzilla fetish. If a G film were scheduled for TV, everything would come to a halt so he could watch. I never quite understood the fascination, but, god love him, he knew everything there was to know about “Baby G.” Come to think of it, one of our first dates was to see the original, no Raymond Burr. Our courtship did have its odd moments. One of his biggest hopes was for “Godzilla: The Musical.”

          • TuuxKabin

            Thank you for the tip, an image opens up some possibilities. I’ll attache final product, soon.

            Another layer to remember Jack by, I’d of been your fifth wheel at the movies.

          • Treant

            My condolences again on the yearly anniversary!

            My dad and I both adore(d) pretty much any 1950’s or 60’s sci-fi movie, which involved giant monsters as often as not. As a very small kid, we were watching Them on TV.

            He kept asking me if I was OK because he was kind of scared. πŸ™‚

            To this day, I still love Hammer Horror, golden age sci fi movies, and really any schlock sci fi or horror.

          • FAEN

            I’m sorry for your loss matey.

          • David Walker

            Thank you, FAEN. Let’s just say that it’s been quite a year.

          • FAEN

            No worries matey. I’m sure it’s been a very tough year.

            *Hugs*

          • Bomer

            My grandmother and I always watched whatever Godzilla (or Mothra) movie that was running on tv. I remember one New Years that was just us sitting in the living room watching a Godzilla marathon on cable.

          • Bad Tom

            Blessings to you on this anniversary. Good memories are one of the best salves.

          • David Walker

            Thank you, good sir. I appreciate that.

          • perversatile

            I too say, Where’s my Godzilla The Musical Dude? I find it unacceptable that we live in a world with Broadway Productions of Carrie, Legally Blond , Bring it On,The Addams Family and even King Kong the fuckin’ Musical
            (in pre-production for 2018) Yet not one single Julie Taymor designed celebration of lush visual excess and radioactive destruction staring Neal Patrick Harris operating a giant green animatronic behemoth with lyrics by by Lin-Manuel Miranda “Every Building I Smash Brings Me One Step Closer to You”

          • David Walker

            The mind wobbles.

          • perversatile

            xoxo

          • 2guysnamedjoe

            Godzilla’s the first movie I remember seeing in a theater. Two friends and I, all around age 7, saw it at the kiddie matinee. One friend got so scared he threw up.

          • David Walker

            Memories are made of this.

          • 2guysnamedjoe

            You too funny!!!

  • Ragnar Lothbrok

    Unbelievable. NO Nuclear anything, anywhere anymore. God dammed people.

  • Treant

    Let’s be realistic. Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen, albeit a radioactive one. We’re not very good at isolating many isotopes from each other and we’re not going to magically figure that out just to solve this one.

    They’re not telling me how “tainted” those 777,000 tons of water are. One part in a thousand? That’s bad. One part in a billion? Not such a big deal.

    Plus tritium has a half-life of a bit under 13 years. It’s not exactly highly radioactive and no great concern in small–or diluted–amounts. And fortunately, water is a marvelous radiation shield.

    ETA: Wikipedia points out that “In January 2014 it was made public that a total of 875 TBq (2.45 g) of tritium are on the site of Fukushima Daiichi,[9]”

    So we’ll be dumping about 3 g of tritium. Thanks for yet another bullshit story, news media. Three fucking grams.

    • Do Something Nice

      Except if it happens to wipe out a susceptible species, it could create a chain-reaction event in the food chain.

      So that half-life is meaningless if it kills life now.

      • Treant

        Citation required. That half life means it just isn’t all that radioactive. 150,000 TBq (200 times this amount) is produced naturally by nitrogen spallation each year.

        And it’s 3 fucking grams total once added to an average yearly load of 500 grams.

        • MBear

          Stop sciencing while we’re trying to have an anti-corporate, xenophobic freak out knee jerk, mmmkay?

        • Do Something Nice

          Citation for what ? And who said it is 3 grams total – the industry executives who said that the disaster couldn’t happen? Yeah, they’ve got a lot of credibility.

          • Treant

            Citation required. If you have better numbers, supply them. Otherwise, I have to go with the best data we have–and so do you.

          • Misutaa Roboto

            The Wiki page he used to spot check the number had, as its proximate source, a Japanese blog (English and French language) that seemed inclined to hype up the significance of it. Specifically, they cited it as the number of becquerels using standard notation so that the reader would feel the full impact of all those zeros (though most have not developed any intuition for what they actually mean). So the actual source he used for his calculation was someone sympathetic to your opinions.

            That page’s source for the numbers is the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry (whose site is, naturally, in Japanese):
            http://www.meti.go.jp/earthquake/nuclear/20140115_01.html

            The data are in the PDFs, which are not convenient to translate. But your assumptions about the source are seemingly wrong.

      • Misutaa Roboto

        Given the amounts in question this is an unlikely scenario.

        Do you have any proposal on an alternative that would make this scenario even less likely?

    • whollyfool

      Thank you for the information and analysis.

    • Mark

      Ah, so it’s okay to use the earth’s oceans as one, bug fucking trashcan. Noted.

      • David Walker

        No, but what’s the alternative? Use the water for irrigation? Bottle it and ship it to North Korea? We have fucked the environment to the breaking point. No argument from me on that.

        • Treant

          It could be trucked to another facility. However…it then has to be stored. The trucking comes with the risk of an accident and spillage…which you really don’t want to happen near a lake that’s used as drinking water (although it probably wouldn’t render the water undrinkable, actually, it’s still not what I’d call a good idea).

          That’s a lot of trucks…and a lot of gasoline…and a lot of CO2 and/or mercury released into the environment burning the gas and burning the methane/coal to process the gas…

          Everything’s a balance.

      • clay

        So, have you heard how Russia and France dispose of highly radioactive materials, rather than this relatively minor issue?
        Perspective.

        • Willys41

          Russia and France do it so let’s everybody do it because clearly it won’t be any worse if every nation on Earth does it seven days a week for the next ten thousand years until the human race goes extinct.

      • Treant

        Nope. Just like it’s not OK to use my post to say something it didn’t (in common parliance, you fucking lied). Noted.

    • KCMC

      so their sushi will not being glowing cooked?

      • Treant

        Nope.

    • Acronym Jim

      So you’re saying all were gonna get is a slightly warm skink instead of a full grown radiation lizard.

      • Treant

        Well, possibly said skink might have a low-energy electron bounce off its skin so…not even that, really.

        • Acronym Jim

          Well poo! You’re no fun.

          • Treant

            I know. I did deadhead the gardens this morning and get stung by a small hornet. So I have approximately 3 trillion femtograms of deadly toxin in my system and you might get lucky and I’ll die with a number that big.

          • Acronym Jim

            I wouldn’t worry about dying, my friend. You’re being enough of a wet blanket that any toxins would be diluted to the point of insignificance.

            Kidding aside, thank you for the reason and science.

        • Xiao Ai: The Social Gadfly

          But, will it shoot lasers from it’s eyes at least?

          • Treant

            Alas, no. Not without my patented “lasers that replace eyes” kit.

            I need better marketing.

    • FloBear

      You miss the point of the story, which is the setting of a precedent. I agree with you that the amount involved is about as significant as a single wedding cake. But like allowing the refusal of that wedding cake, this dumping would set a precedent. I think that acknowledging the other sides dilemma would be in order.

      • Treant

        Slippery slope argument. We’re not discussing precedent, we’re discussing something that does, occasionally, happen and has to be evaluated on a case by case basis.

        The containment unit is failing and dumping this water anyway. They’re adding more than 300 tons of water per day to keep the mess cool, and have nowhere to go with it. Leaking water isn’t a controlled release, it’s on-shore at all hours, and has a good chance of getting into the drinking water.

        The possibilities are limited. Ocean dumping of 3 grams of tritium is the one that looks to have the least environmental impact.

    • Dana Chilton

      Do you know what a half life is? Not exactly radioactive? Is that scientific? Do you know how tritium is absorbed? Do you know what happens once it’s introduced into the food supply? Wikipedia points out that “people who use Wikipedia as their source material usually have no idea how proper research works”

      • Treant

        Yes, I know what a half-life is, and this was hardly my only source–I actually only used it for…

        But you don’t care, now do you? Carry on, I’m finished with the ascientific around here.

    • vorpal 😼

      Thanks for putting this into perspective.

      Tritium has an atomic weight (IIRC) of 3: one proton, two neutrons.
      By Avogadro’s Number, that means they will be dumping approx 4.918081699883334 x 10^23 molecules of tritium into the ocean.

      By contrast, a deep breath of air contains approximately 4.73 x 10^22 molecules. So this is the equivalent in number of molecules as ten deep breaths.

      Given the short half-life, this should be quite low on our list of concerns.

      (*Assuming I chemistried right. It’s been a long time.)

      • Treant

        It’s the tiniest hair greater than three due to the neutron weight and the electron insistently photobombing the atom, but close enough. πŸ™‚

        Even if this were 300 grams–one hundred times the amount reported–I find this of minimal concern except that we wouldn’t want to make a habit of it, of course.

    • EdmondWherever

      Someone probably said the same thing about carbon emissions when the gasoline engine was invented. 160 years later….

      • Treant

        Slippery slope argument.

        Call me in 160 years, assuming tritium production goes up (it’s of limited use, actually, barring the invention of realistic deuterium-tritium fusion…in which case the waste product is harmless, non-radioactive helium, not tritium).

        In this particular instance, we’re talking about dumping 3 grams of tritium, just like the first gas engine emitted a few pounds of carbon.

        Both are of extremely limited impact that you won’t ever notice.

    • Niblet58

      If there isn’t that much of it maybe they should dump in the CEO’s back yard….

      • Treant

        770,000 gallons of seawater would be enough to ruin anybody’s flower garden just from the salt alone. πŸ™‚

        And while point release on land wouldn’t be a good idea, the land would be entirely livable. I just wouldn’t use the well water until the salt goes away and the tritium disperses.

        The salt will take longer.

    • Misutaa Roboto

      Seriously, thanks for checking out the actual amount of Tritium we’re talking about.

      It’s annoying that the article only gave us the number of tons of water, which on its own isn’t particularly helpful except perhaps to show how difficult the problem of trying to separate it out would actually be. Unfortunately, for too many people the actual numbers (and the available alternatives) don’t seem to matter.

  • Gustav2
    • djcoastermark

      Now this is obscene. The kind of obscenity that needs to be outlawed.

    • TrueWords

      We have pretty much outlawed plastic in our home…we are trying to make it happen…it is hard..but we are trying…

      • FAEN

        It’s not as difficult and didn’t cost us too much.

        I wish they would outlaw plastic bags from ALL stores!!

      • bzrd

        Many municipalities in California do outlaw plastic bags at the check out and others charge for bags so many bring their own when shopping. Also, we have a good recycle service with compost material separate thus the garbage can usually is empty most collection days.

    • Mark

      When I was working on Bali, every morning, the crews were out raking the garbage off the beaches so the tourists could enjoy the “clean” beaches. The things I saw! Soccer balls, pill bottles, flip flops, even mannequin parts! I never stepped foot in the water while I was there.

  • Do Something Nice

    Japan has some nice design, great people and interesting food. But I don’t trust their ‘industry officials’ to tell the truth, even if their lives depended upon it.

  • Leo

    “Quickly diluted?” Excuse me? There’s arguments no where near seeming scientific and then there’s straight up trolling. This is the latter. California Greenpeace is already apoplectic – I can’t imagine how, idk, Tokyo residents feel.

  • Rebecca Gardner

    Well, I guess in the plus side, given the amount of SCUBA diving I do, I’ll save money on lighting because I’ll start glowing in the dark.

    Humans Suck!!!

  • Snownova

    Ah but then according to homeopaths the entire ocean will be just as radioactive as the concentrated tritium!

  • Michael R
  • Boreal
  • TrueWords

    If you have not seen this movie it is SO worth it…it really speaks to what is being reported:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zgyq6YKeIms

  • Rebecca Gardner

    Is there anything we can do to stop this insanity?

    https://twitter.com/BikerBecca/status/886206900534034433

    • Treant

      Shield our atmosphere from all incoming cosmic rays (a shell 10 meters thick of solid steel should do it). Most natural tritium is produced by nitrogen spallation to the tune of 200 times more per year than this release would involve (or, this release is the equivalent of a day and a half of natural tritium production).

      • Rebecca Gardner

        Are you being sarcastic?

        My concern is the precedent this sets and now everyone is going to start dumping everything into our oceans. Without our oceans this planet has no life.

        • Treant

          Not sarcastic at all, that’s a slippery slope argument. Nobody’s talking about wholesale dumping of hot nuclear waste into the ocean and I’d be objecting loudly if they did. They’re discussing 3 grams of tritium diluted in 777,000 metric tons of seawater that they cannot, under any circumstances, filter out because it’s indistinguishable from the hydrogen in the other water molecules.

          Compared to the regional load of tritium, it’s not a big deal and tritium simply isn’t that dangerous anyway.

          And before anybody makes the argument, no I won’t eat 3 grams of tritium, it would kill me. I also weigh less than 70 kg, so I couldn’t realistically drink 777,000 tons of water anyway so the argument is moot. Just the natural sodium would kill me before I got through 10 gallons.

          • Rebecca Gardner

            Where are you getting the 3 grams number from?

          • Treant

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tritium#Fukushima_Daiichi

            You can also step directly to reference #9, http://fukushima-diary.com/2014/01/875000000000000-bq-of-tritium-contained-in-total-contaminated-water-over-60-times-much-as-safety-limit/

            Which will point out that this is sixty times the water safety limit. Or, dilute this down to 42,000,000 tons of water and you could directly dump this with nobody saying a word…because it simply isn’t a problem.

            Which is what the ocean will do very, very quickly.

          • Rebecca Gardner

            That says nothing about how much they are dumping.

          • Treant

            Three. Grams. Maximum.

          • Bad Tom

            You’d die from water poisoning long before the radiation got you.

          • Treant

            I’d die from the sodium long before water poisoning got me. πŸ™‚

            I do wonder if some of these people ever take Pepto-Bismol. Bismuth is now known to be radioactive, so it must, therefore, be completely fatal in even the smallest amounts…

            No, seriously, my husband worried about that until I explained the half-life and the idea of Avogadro’s Number.

            πŸ™‚

          • Bad Tom

            Well, if it was seawater– it might be a race!

            Announcer: How badly, and in which way can this man fuck up his own osmostat?!? Stay tuned for more!

          • Treant

            I’m pretty sure a radio station did something like this. They did kill that one mom with water for a Wii, after all.

        • clay

          The precedent has already been set in much worse ways. Both France and Russia have dumped highly radioactive waste into the Ocean for decades. France takes used nuclear fuel rods and sinks them in the Bay of Biscay. Russia has scuttled at least 16 nuclear cores in the Kara Sea, leaving it devoid of life. The Ob River in Western Siberia literally glows at night. The dumping of this tritium does not set any precedent.

  • netxtown

    NASA and China, and Russia – and all the rest – had better get hot and heavy on getting out of here. Survival time is fleeting…

  • Karl Dubhe
    • TuuxKabin

      Sweet. El HubCap volunteers at citizen workshops, helping them with their paper work requirements. Going to one today. I’m going to see to it he spreads this news, as I will too. Thanks!

    • b-b-but Jr’s emails!

      Well, 45 is busy signing all those really, really, really, important executive orders and checks to defense lawyers.

      • Todd20036

        Actually, 45 doesn’t pay his lawyers.

        • FAEN

          He doesn’t pay anyone.

          • pj

            never did

          • kareemachan

            never will.

          • Helenlross

            Google is paying 97$ per hour! Work for few hours and have longer with friends & family! !pa23d:
            On tuesday I got a great new Land Rover Range Rover from having earned $8752 this last four weeks.. Its the most-financialy rewarding I’ve had.. It sounds unbelievable but you wont forgive yourself if you don’t check it
            !pa23d:
            ➽➽
            ➽➽;➽➽ http://GoogleFinancialJobsCash23FinderBusinessGetPay$97Hour β˜…β˜…βœ«β˜…β˜…βœ«β˜…β˜…βœ«β˜…β˜…βœ«β˜…β˜…βœ«β˜…β˜…βœ«β˜…β˜…βœ«β˜…β˜…βœ«β˜…β˜…βœ«β˜…β˜…βœ«β˜…β˜…βœ«β˜…β˜…βœ«β˜…β˜…βœ«β˜…β˜…βœ«β˜…β˜…βœ«β˜…β˜…βœ«β˜…β˜…βœ«β˜…β˜…:::::!pa23l..,…

    • bambinoitaliano

      What a lucky guy! I would not want a certificate stained with the name of the shit gibbon.

      • FAEN

        My niece and nephew graduated with honors from middle and elementary school respectively and received certificates signed by Cheeto. When his letter was read out loud in the auditorium people groaned and winced. Both of them were disgusted-my nephew almost threw his away.

        How ironic that in the not too distant future immigrants are going to receive a welcome letter from Cheeto.

        • bambinoitaliano

          The very thought of having his name on immigrant women’s paper is insulting and humiliating. It gives the feeling of having a rapist as the gynecologist.

          • FAEN

            Exactly!

    • Droz

      It’s all part of the secret shadow government’s evil plan.

    • robert

      I got one from Bush junior. I wish it had been from Barry.

    • bkmn

      I doubt Blimpo has bothered to sign a similar letter. I have a feeling some staffer feels better putting the Obama letter in the packets.

    • Xiao Ai: The Social Gadfly

      Congratulations to Aisha and her husband!

      We still have much work to do though. Consider Singaporean Gadfly, Amos Yee. Yee was granted U.S. asylum by a judge in Wisconsin but, he’s been held in detention due to Trump’s Homeland Security and ICE since at least December. This is unacceptable.

      Why are we not demanding his release?

    • Ninja0980

      Good for him!
      Who would want a letter from Trump?

  • I just can’t any more. Will someone please tell me why homo sapiens even deserves to go on?

  • Jmdintpa

    God dont like nuclear power……and god dont like ugly either.

  • Johnny Wyeknot

    Godzilla

    • TuuxKabin

      Rules!

    • kareemachan

      Gojira!

  • bambinoitaliano

    So it begins. The creation of radio active Godzilla and Mothra. Sometimes I think we are living in a dream watching the world changing into Hollywood fictional realm right before our eyes.

  • shellback

    My S&W 9mm semi-auto has tritium sights for night use. Gorgeous green glow.

    • Treant

      Betalights are neat! I’ve considered one as emergency lighting since their half-life on luminosity is quite good (13 years).

    • Rebecca Gardner

      I have the Green/Orange Trijicons on my H&K USP.

    • canoebum

      Sure, but how does it look on your sushi?

  • SoCalGal20

    OT but, shocking nobody, Pence is a liar. And currently he’s lying about OH Medicaid.

    https://twitter.com/theplumlinegs/status/886183963127054336

    • djcoastermark

      This could fit nicely into the “infighting is fun ” category.

    • canoebum

      The GOP take is “All’s fair in love and destroying everything the black guy did”.

    • Bj Lincoln

      This is why it’s so hard to believe anything.

    • FAEN

      Pence-continually lying for Jeebus.

      • SoCalGal20

        And the Koch brothers.

        • kareemachan

          And mother.

    • UrsusArctos

      But, BUT, Mike Pence has proudly stated on multiple occasions “I’m a Christian, a conservative, and a Republican, in that order” so it’s OK. All three of those cults gangs all are fine with lying to win.

      • Willys41

        republicans have no idea what real Christianity is all about. Virtually everything they believe is diametrically opposed to even the most basic tenets of Christianity.

  • Tom Mears

    Not that it is an excuse, but separating the tritium (heavy isotope of hydrogen) out of that amout of water is an almost intractable problem. There are a number of commercial plants scattered across the globe that do this. One of the largest is located in Ontario. It has the capacity to handle about 2,500 tons of water per year. So a mere 308 years would be needed. At that rate it would almost be quicker to let the tritium decay naturally.

    They could probably build a plant using a hybrid approach, relying on both separation and decay, that would do the trick in just a hundered years πŸ˜‰

    Just to make things even more complicated, they continue to generate 300 tons of additional contaminated water every day. The additional water is used to keep reactor melt-down cooled and under some semblance of control. There apparently is also a time crunch, in that the contaminated water is already leaking out of the temporary tanks it is stored in.

    This is a problem with NO happy solution. They are stuck with having to choose which awful solution to pick.

    • Willys41

      Obviously too much to expect that someone should’ve anticipated the problem and taken steps to prepare. Obviously it would cost way too much money for a profit-oriented corporation to even consider.

  • TuuxKabin

    Get some free ice cream tomorrow before it melts down. NYC locations, don’t know ’bout the rest of the country.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/eats/8-spots-free-frozen-treats-national-ice-cream-day-article-1.3326735

  • dcurlee

    People are determined to kill us all

  • David Walker

    I understand the concerns this raises, but I’m kind of also not all that upset. I (and everyone else in the region) lived through Three Mile Island. It was a harrowing experience, especially since the power company, MetEd, was issuing lies as press releases (sound familiar?). They lied not just to residents and the press, but to state and local government, too. Pregnant women were urged to evacuate, everyone was told to stay indoors. Everyone within a 10-mile radius of TMI was told to pack and be ready to leave. Two days of pandemonium until President Carter sent Dr. Denton.

    Cooling water exposed to the near-meltdown was released into the Susquehanna River. Blinky (the Simpsons’ 3-eyed fish pictured elsewhere in this thread) was not known yet, but speculation of what it would do to fish and wildlife and communities that used the Susquehanna as a water supply ran wild. Nothing happened, but the resulting gallows’ humor went on for years.

    The point is that once we started to get real information, fears disappeared. Our lives were in danger, and we subsequently found out that we were closer to meltdown than originally thought. I realize that what we went through and the amount of radiation we and our water supply were exposed to is nothing like the Fukushima disaster. However, at some point we have to get information. As I would expect, there are a couple of people here at JMG who have knowledge and experience and if they say releasing the water is the best alternative, then I will believe them. I won’t like it. I wish there were an alternative, but I wish there was an alternative to our current government, too.

    There is a fear of radiation and radioactive stuff. I get it. Believe me. I lived through it. And that’s the thing is, I lived through it. Set aside fear and get facts.

    • Bj Lincoln

      Thank you for sharing and being a level head in face of the fear.

      • David Walker

        Thanks, Bj. It something I learned really fast in broadcasting.

    • Treant

      Yeah, I’m local to that as well. I found the reports of dying forests particularly amusing. My cousin breathlessly re-reported every news article she read.

      Also, our local paper reported that trillions of picocuries of radiation had been released (like the TBq numbers thrown about in the article). Both picocuries and Becquerel are radiation measurements best covered by “Too Small To Matter In Your Life.” Just sitting here, I radiate at 4,400 Bq. Or, to hype it up, 4,400,000,000 uBq. Somebody encase me in lead.

      • kareemachan

        Well, forests are dying, but it’s mostly cuz of climate change and the increase in the territory of various insects.

        • Treant

          True. And the continuing invasion of the European earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris, or the common nightcrawler that lives in my gardens and lawn by the tens of thousands).

      • Bad Tom

        If that lead were mined and smelted after the atomic age began, it is also slightly radioactive.

        • Treant

          Fun Fact: This is also a way to determine the age of wines, contained water, and paintings.

          Wines and water in containers had natural tritium. Measure that and you know the age, if the liquid is younger than a century or so. After that, other methods must be used.

          Paintings done after Hiroshima contain radioactivity gathered by the plants that made the oil base. You can, at the very minimum, determine if the painting is real, or a fake made after 1945. πŸ™‚

      • David Walker

        Never! I like how you glow in the dark.

        • Treant

          Those are actually the LED lights I make. My personal radiation is in the gamma range. Which is really hot, baby. Really hot.

    • kareemachan

      Okay, that’s one example. Now, let’s look at Chernobyl. I have expat friends who work with their kids’ school in Germany every year to bring kids from that area to fix their teeth. The effects are still being felt there.

      And we could mention that lovely spot in WA state – Hanford. You know, the place that gave the surrounding population a much-larger-than-average rate of thyroid cancer.

      As somebody said above, *your* experience does not make for the norm. We were damned lucky with 3-mile Island.

      As you said, facts are a good thing.

      • Friday

        Though with Chernobyl, the problems *aren’t* from tritium water, it’s basically stuff like cesium and strontium and irradiated fallout. Any radioactive water may or may not have made the water table lingeringly ‘hot’ but that’s because it *wouldn’t* have dispersed, say, into the ocean.

    • jerry

      Yes, I had 2 friends in college from Middletown who grew up in the shadow of those cooling towers…they recounted the panic at their school during the accident, when they were juniors or seniors in HS.
      And I still have a lot of acquaintances that live near some major chemical plants, where a major leak could happen at any time. Hell, my water is frequently tested for C8 levels, to see if I’m getting poisoned so the world can have nonstick cookware.

      • David Walker

        I want you to know, Jerry, that we appreciate your sacrifice. A world without nonstick cookware…I can’t even imagine. (Actually, I can, but that would ruin the narrative.)

        • jerry

          Yeah, I don’t think I could live without it either.

  • bambinoitaliano

    I suppose Japan no longer can rely on US to defend itself from North Korea, perhaps it’s not so subtle way of retaliation to get back at the Pillsbury dough boy by nuking North Korea. Have some three-eyed fish Kimmy. They are delicious!

    • Bj Lincoln

      Dumping it in a channel that would take it right to NK would be great except not all of it would stay there.

  • Kent Allard
    • David Walker

      But there was a certain charm when G was a guy in a Godzilla suit.

  • David Brian Holt

    The paranoia surrounding radiation is anti-science. You’re going to be exposed to far more radiation walking on a beach, eating a banana, flying on a plane, or living near a coal power plant, than you will be by this.

    • Natty Enquirer

      Sometimes it’s not all about you and your personal exposure. Did you read the last part about setting a precedent? The attitude that the oceans can absorb anything has led to huge patches of plastic waste and the slow poisoning of sea life.

      • David Brian Holt

        There is a HUGE different in impact between plastic waste and radiation in the ocean. For one, radiation exists naturally in the ocean and has for billions of years. That’s not a logical comparison.

    • Treant

      Slippery slope arguments coming up. This will, apparently, lead to us generating megatons of strontium-90 and ditching it in there just for funsies.

      Also, you’re a fuckwad doodyhead if you disgree with me. So there. Nyah. And this also proves that vaccines cause autism.

      (Here I thought we were supposed to be the sensible party, but really, it’s just that humans are really, really ignorant as a whole).

    • kareemachan

      So give us numbers. Facts. It’s not paranoia to be concerned about this – AND THE PRECEDENT IT SETS – when the oceans are already under seige.

    • stevenj

      The radiation issue for humans walking on a beach, eating a banana etc aside, how is this safe for the aquatic environment? Do you think it is safe to eat seafood caught off the coast of Fukushima after the dumping begins?

      • Treant

        Yes…but they won’t just because over-caution is a good general rule. To my knowledge, there’s still a fishing and shellfish ban from the immediate region.

        • stevenj

          I wouldn’t. Don’t have an appetite for fish that have been exposed to radioactive waste. I also don’t think the world’s oceans should be treated like they are sewers (radioactive waste or otherwise) but then I guess I was born several centuries to late for that.

          • Treant

            All the other choices of what to do with this stuff are worse.

      • Friday

        Once the tritium water is dispersed, on that score, yes. Chemically, it’s just water, (the hydrogen in it has extra neutrons, so it won’t *accumulate* in ways radioactive isotopes of metals and the like would. ) The prime danger is simple exposure to what it gives off, so it’s just a matter of making sure the concentrations aren’t too high somewhere before that dispersal happens, plus minding anything else that might also be in that water.

    • Friday

      Come down to it, it seems they have a whole lot of tritium-laden water and there isn’t a whole lot else that can be done about it on that scale than disperse it out in the ocean. In this case the environmental activists don’t seem to get the fact that ‘just clean up the water’ is not such an easy proposition as they may assume, …almost all that tritium will of course be in a *heavy water* which there’s no *chemical* way to separate from regular water, of course, and what are they going to do, build a centrifuge half the size of the power plant? Don’t think so.

      Anyway. Actually come down to it radioactive *seawater* is probably best dispersed way out cause it’s a bigger threat to soil and *groundwater* than it is to the deep ocean. (A certain proportion of seawater is ‘heavy water’ to begin with, of course,) And probably the time to do that is sooner cause seawater and whatever is holding it in probably aren’t going to get along forever corrosionwise. A good question of course is what *else* is in that seawater and in what concentration,

  • Acronym Jim

    I was thinking of making a Godzilla comment, but I knew you guys wouldn’t disappoint.

  • Harveyrabbit

    Jebus! Don’t they even watch their own documentaries in Japan??!
    This will not end well!

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/69f584b7b9b1c0f59cce78bc2efce6cc68f1cd4a15e372e3fcc72ba8e8fe25b7.jpg

  • Acronym Jim

    It’s a good thing they aren’t dumping growth hormones in the ocean or we would be facing another night of the Lepus (aka Fiver’s revenge)…

    …oh shit.

  • who is surprised? what, did you think they were going to dump it in Tokyo? of course the sea is the ‘only’ answer the nuke folks can come up with, other than sparsely populated areas in the american west, which isn’t really an option here.

    i hate the fact that we can’t perfect nuke power in a way that would not demolish the planet, cause it will likely be a primary “solution” when fossil fuels run out. the fact is, if the oceans die, we all die. it’s really that simple. luckily, GCC will probably kill most life on this planet off well before that happens. so there’s that.

    • (((GC)))

      You mean Godzilla won’t become real? πŸ™

    • CraigNJ

      We’d all be eating Soylent Green.
      https://youtu.be/9IKVj4l5GU4

    • Friday

      For tritium water, dispersal into the ocean actually is the best solution: basically you get a little rise in the ordinary background count of seawater there until it disperses. Tritium is different from a lot of other radioactive wastes and hazards in that it acts like any other water chemically and otherwise, so it doesn’t accumulate in wildlife or concentrate in a location any more than particular water molecules would.

      Having it sitting around in high concentrations somewhere it might get out of containment and irradiate a whole bunch of other stuff just isn’t a solution for any kind of longer term. And, you know, there’s like not melting down your nuclear plants in the first place of course, but we’re past that.

    • Franciscan

      Couldn’t they haul it off to North Korea? Bwa-ha-ha!

      • Tulle Christensen

        If they dump it on the southwest side of Japan the currents should take it there

  • boobert

    Isn’t that how we got Godzilla ?

    • This is how we get Godzilla, yes.

      • CB

        Thanks for clearing that up.

  • netxtown

    Resistance is futile! If the tritium doesn’t get ya – the mac n cheese will!

    http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/15/health/macaroni-and-cheese-phthalates-analysis-study/index.html

  • Gil

    Out of sight. Out of mind. Humanities cognitive solution to all its self-inflicted dilemmas.

    • Friday

      Actually in the case of tritium, which’ll be in the form of a heavy water, mixed in with a lot of ordinary water, dispersal in the ocean *is* what to do with the stuff. There isn’t a way to get it *out* of seawater on any kind of scale or timeframe that’s safe or reasonable, (if they could, it’d actually be valuable for things like medical research and some other applications, actually) ….but that’s because it behaves basically like any other water, and mix with all the other seawater, some proportion of which molecules are already ‘heavy water’ all along. Basically yer problem is that if you keep it contained in high concentrations, it could get *out* in high concentrations and irradiate a bunch of other stuff. Getting it in the groundwater would be non-helpful.

      It’s generally other radioactive isotopes you have to worry about bioaccumulating in animal life or contaminating soil, plants, what have you.

  • Waarki

    How prescient …

    https://youtu.be/cqaslCGn-6w

  • Tulle Christensen

    Say you are releasing 777,000 tons of water tainted with tritium tells me nothing as there is no info on what percent of the water is tritium based. Too bad we never got fusion working well, they would love all that tritium

    • Tulle Christensen

      to let everyone know tritium decays into helium 3 by giving off an electron and a neutrino, ah wait let me check…. ah no an anti-neutrino, it is not a very dangerous radiation (called beta radiation much less destructive than gamma radiation)

    • Friday

      Yeah, though I don’t think they’d have the *time* to get that tritium water out of all the rest of that water, really, meanwhile it’s a lot more of a hazard sitting around in high concentrations. It’s just a matter of dispersing the stuff at a reasonably-safe rate.

  • djcoastermark

    Yeah, it’ll dissipate. That’s what they said about dumping all kinds of crap into the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland Ohio, in the mid 1900’s . It’ll dissipate into Lake Erie. Why, look at all that water. By the late 1960’s Parts of Lake Erie were too polluted to swim in or fish in. Lastly, the Cuyahoga river caught fire. The river! Something to think about. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/89707d60410865b4a8431d5a50289d973a945488fb80415c408a25e69cef6cb3.jpg

    • Tulle Christensen

      Well the heavy water will decay into a hydroxide ion and a Helium 3 atom, (Chemistry is not my strong point so bear with me) and because of molecular bounding magic (yea as good as I get in this area) there is always some amount of hydroxide in any water.

      As per my post below there will also be an electron (not very dangerous) and an anti-neutrino and there are billions of those passing through your body right now given off from the sun

      So the biggest danger is the electron and except in very very high concentrations is not really dangerous

      • Tulle Christensen

        If anyone is interested, 42 years ago I was a physics major, but 40 years ago changed to a computer science major so I could make good money with out getting a doctorate

        My main interests in physics were particle and astrophysics

    • Max_1

      Dilution of the pollution makes it go away…
      … Just don’t strike a match and set it aflame.

  • Gregory In Seattle
  • fuzzybits

    Mother nature weeps.

  • -M-

    It’s good to be wary radioactive contamination but bad to be paranoid.

  • Max_1
  • TexasBoy

    I know this sounds a bit Space 1999-ish, but why can’t they put it on a rocket to the moon, or the sun, or Jupiter or something?

    • leastyebejudged

      Nuclear waste put on a rocket, what could go wrong ?

  • leastyebejudged

    This is the shining bright nuclear future nuclear power proponents are eager for.

  • Stubenville

    Cheetolini blames Obama in 3… 2… 1…

  • andrew

    Enjoy your fish dinners people of Japan.

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  • Willys41

    Yet another proof that private profit-based industry lacks the morals to be trusted with nuclear waste that is the inevitable product of nuclear power generation.

  • goofy_joe

    Ugh. If a tsunami can begin in Japan, and affect CA, and Hawaii, then it’s wise to assume any toxic waste put in the ocean will also spread. Not to mention the fish and other sea life that will ingest it at the source, and…oh I dunno…SWIM to other locations?

    This is fucking stupid.