Hillary To Address Substance Abuse In DNC Video

Watch below. Via press release:

Tonight, Hillary for America and the Democratic National Convention Committee will show that the American people are united together to take on some of our country’s most urgent challenges. Hillary Clinton’s career has been about putting families first, and the opioid epidemic is quietly tearing families apart in communities across the country.

Tonight’s Democratic National Convention Committee video “Combating Substance Abuse” shows Hillary Clinton’s steadfast commitment to preventing and treating addiction, supporting people in recovery, and taking on this epidemic once and for all. Her bold plans to tackle addiction and substance use disorders were informed by the early, small meetings in New Hampshire in 2015 where Granite Staters shared their personal stories about how they have been impacted by this disease. The video also features Pam Livengood from Keene, New Hampshire and one of tonight’s featured speakers.

Hillary Clinton believes that we are stronger together and, as she says in the video, that “everybody should feel that they are valued, they are cared about, and they have a president who sees them.”

  • Baby Dave

    I’m glad she is addressing this issue. I completely agree with her in this respect

    • MattM

      HOW MUCH DID KILLARY PAY YOU, PIG?!?!??!

      /s

      • Daniel Leyva

        Nothing.

        • MattM

          I was mocking the Bernie trolls. I forgot the /s at the end. In my defense, I assumed the all caps was clue.

          • David Gervais

            No, I didn’t get that the first time either.

          • MattM

            Whoops.

          • Daniel Leyva

            Apology then.

          • Daniel Leyva

            I mean, I apologize

        • Marc

          (Pretty certain MattM is being snarky. Baby Dave had a long history of what were basically Bernie or Bust comments.)

          • Baby Dave

            Nothing wrong with a little snark here and there

          • Marc

            Not at all. If I can’t be snarky, sarcastic or self-deprecating I have a lot less to talk about..

          • Baby Dave

            There is only one group of people I genuinely fear, and those are the humorless. Once you’ve lost he capacity to laugh in any way other than the sadistic gloat of the wannabe conqueror, you’ve ceased to be human.

            I’m reminded of a story a friend told me, about a Zen monk encountering a soldier during the Shogun era. The soldier said to the monk, “Is there really such a thing as hell?” So the monk slapped him hard across the cheek. When the soldier drew his sword, the monk said, “This is hell”. The monk realized what he was doing, sheathed the sword, and shook the monk’s hand. The monk replied, “This is heaven”.

    • Maybe she’ll also cover people who abuse diet pills to the point of being driven insane.

  • Bruno

    Horrible! Corporate shill! Wall St. whore!

    • Daniel Leyva

      Whore? LOL, how much is trump paying you? After the hack, nothing surprises me.

      • Guess that standing by your adulterous husband instead of divorcing his ass, makes you a whore or something. (GOP logic)

        • Daniel Leyva

          Those people need a dictionary. They claim to be intelligent, and they have shown they are idiots.

  • vorpal

    She talks about addressing this issue, but WHAT does she plan to do about it?

    Former (mostly, on rare occasions current) opioid addict / abuser here, and all of my opioids have always been legally obtained (either through prescriptions or as “research chemicals”), and in the past, due to chronic illness, were absolutely necessary. (Doesn’t mean I wasn’t addicted, though.)

    I hope this does not mean something idiotic like increased funding of the war on drugs (fail). I’d like to see more and cheaper availability of suboxone and / or methadone for people struggling, with faster access to programs.

    • D. J.

      It seems like those who are genuinely in chronic pain often end up in the crosshairs instead. Chronic pain patients should not be forced into an existence of misery because of abusers.

      • vorpal

        I agree with this, but there is a very fine line between opioid dependence for chronic pain and opioid addiction. Many easily cross that line, and many people who abuse prescription opioids started off with chronic pain.

        I know that that was certainly the case for me: I had severe Crohn’s to the point where food could not pass through my body due to massive inflammation and scarring. My husband would literally have to massage hard lumps through my abdomen while I tried not to scream and bit into a towel (not in the fun way). I had a fever of 101 – 104F every day for over three years, was on about eight different daily medications and a bi-monthly infusion that totaled over $150k / year, and was receiving blood transfusions every two weeks as I was incapable of absorbing many nutrients. (I am 6’1 and weighed 135 lbs.)

        On the other hand, I have been taking Xanax since 1999 for generalized anxiety, and while I recognize that I am Xanax-dependent, I would never say that I am addicted to it. Opioids are damned hard to NOT get addicted to, but in cases like mine, given the choice, I would much rather go through the addiction: I would have absolutely killed myself otherwise, and I have mostly managed to give the opioids up, barring a few forays into research chemicals out of stupid fun.

        • D. J.

          If the patient has exhausted other methods – TENS, acupuncture, biofeedback, anti-depressants,……. I think compassionate opioid availability should be readily available. Surgery doesn’t repair crushed/severed nerves.
          There is a reason there is a diagnosis of failed back surgery. Discs don’t always blow out. They can also blow into the spinal canal and leave one permanently fucked up, even after a laminectomy.
          Things like car accidents happen daily. Individuals don’t fit into neat boxes on paper.

          • vorpal

            Related aside: I had to do a 15 week mindfulness meditation course (not missing a single session) to even get prescribed opioids, and it was a great experience and tool to have. I no longer get anything more than occasional Tramadol prescribed and seldom need it at that, but I do mindfulness meditation every day and it has improved my life dramatically.

        • VICE, the news show on HBO, did a segment on fecal transplants (yes, exactly what you think it is) and how effective it’s been with numerous diseases but specifically Crohn’s.

          • vorpal

            I’ve heard about that. If it comes out of remission, as odd as that sounds, I’m pretty much wiling to try anything to not go through what I did in the past.

    • John30013

      I’d also like to see changes in how these drugs are regulated and dispensed, although some of that would have to be done by the states. But if we can regulate sales of Sudafed, we can do the same with opioids.

      • D. J.

        They have changed the way opiates are regulated and dispensed. More Federal regulations just took effect this month.
        Many doctors will not prescribe under any circumstances now, unless they are surgeons.

        • vorpal

          Absolutely the wrong approach, in my opinion.

        • vorpal

          As an addendum: it is JUST so stupid how this is handled. I can get fentanyl analogues and U-47700 – all extremely potent and much more dangerous opioids than even heroin – delivered to me through the mail as research chemicals if I so choose, but if I just need a little oxycodone to manage pain, my doctor must jump through reams and reams of paperwork.

      • Baby Dave

        Many states don’t regulate Sudafed. Indiana (which has one of the worst meth epidemics int he country) refuses to regulate the precursors. Many state lawmakers attribute this to the unpopularity of the idea, others attribute it to the usual GOP delusions about state regulation of just about anything.

        • John30013

          Still, my point is that it can be done. The fact that some politicians are stupid isn’t a valid counter-argument. The Feds could come up with some other classification for opioids, and require different prescribing standards. That would at least take it out of the hands of stupid state legislators.

          • Baby Dave

            It can be done, if the popular will exists

            The Indiana GOP (Pence included) is apparently relying on the meth head vote. That could explain their policies

      • vorpal

        The last thing, though, that I want to see is for pain patients to have a GREATER degree of difficulty in getting these drugs. When I was in severe pain, it was already quite difficult for me to get the amount of pain medication that I needed, and that involved a very long period of time and effort, along with some manipulation of my doctors, which didn’t exactly make me feel like a good person. Not exactly what I needed psychologically on top of being so ill for over three years to the point where I could barely function.

        Indeed, I very nearly committed suicide once because my pain was so bad and undertreated: the only reason I failed was because I faltered and made a couple mistakes in my plan, and thus was discovered prior to succeeding. At least at THAT point, my doctors took my pain VERY seriously, which is what I needed.

        • D. J.

          People should not have to kill themselves for pain relief.
          I hope you are surviving well Vorpal.

          • vorpal

            Had surgery in 2010, switched to methadone, got off of it, and am doing quite well now most of the time :-). Thanks for your kind words, D. J.

        • John30013

          I agree that pain needs to be managed effectively, and if an opioid is the best medication for the job, then it should be prescribed. But it seems like many doctors go right for the opioids for even small things (like toothaches or, in one case for me, after my laser eye surgery), when something less powerful and potentially addictive would work just as well. I also think that people who are prescribed opioid medication should be carefully followed up by their medical providers to (a) ensure that the dose is effective and not excessive, (b) verify that the patient is not becoming addicted, and (c) determine whether other treatment modalities (e.g., chiropractic) could offer some relief (and therefore reduce or eliminate the opioid dosage).

          • D. J.

            All of that happens in Florida.
            1) no more than a 28 day supply
            2) MRI must be current
            3) regular drug testing to make sure pt is consuming meds
            4) X-rays at least twice per year
            5) Dr must physically examine pt each visit
            6) blood profile at least 4 times per year
            7) Surgical history to be provided, preferably with surgical report.
            8) Pt will be expelled if any illegal substances are detected in drug screens.

          • vorpal

            Not much different than in Ontario, where we had max 30 day supply, drug testing for each prescription, examination each visit, and – I think – several blood profiles a year. (I have no idea if / what the requirement is for that, as I used to get blood tests every couple months for health reasons.)

          • John30013

            While those are all good steps, given how potentially addictive these drugs are, I hope there is also good access to treatment programs for people who do, unfortunately, become addicted to their meds. If there were less shame and stigma around the addiction part, and good access to treatment, people would be more likely to come forward at the early stages of addiction, when it’s more likely to be successfully treated.

            Addiction harms more than just the abuser. Addicted parents can’t care for their children. There’s an economic impact from lost employee productivity, an increase in criminal activity, etc.

          • vorpal

            Agreed! It took me several weeks to get on methadone, and it should have been much faster. Many addicts make these decisions quickly and have their minds easily changed. They need help WHEN they are suddenly ready for it.

          • John30013

            I’m glad you were able to get the help you needed.

          • D. J.

            As I stated, this is what CHRONIC pain patients must due to get the meds they need. It’s highly unlikely that they will ever be cured of their pain. Management is the best they can hope for. Remove that hope and the suicide rate will skyrocket.
            These measures don’t apply to street drugs, obviously.

          • D. J.

            It is unlikely that parents with Chronic Pain Syndrome can care for kids w/o a lot of assistance. How do you care for a child if you cannot pick up anything heavier than 5-10 pounds? You can barely walk, much less run? Can walk for limited distances?
            I’m talking about supervised medical care, not street drugs. Drugs like crack and meth are not prescribed to alleviate physical pain.
            Hydrocodone is now in the same classification as Oxycontin. In much of the rest of the world Tylenol #3 (codeine phosphate & Tylenol) is over the counter.
            Have you ever had a really, really bad toothache? Imagine that 25% or 50% or 75% of your body felt like that 100% of the time. Or that your pain level was so high you couldn’t tell for sure if your tooth was aching.
            That is what Chronic Pain is like.

    • Mike Rasor

      She’s had a fact sheet up on the issue for a while that gives detailed plans. https://www.hillaryclinton.com/briefing/factsheets/2015/09/02/combat-addiction/

  • WebSlinger

    Don’t get me wrong I please to see it is being talked about however…

    The response to the rise in heroin use follows patterns we’ve seen over decades of drug scares. When the perception of the user population is primarily people of color, then the response is to demonize and punish which is what was done when her husband was President there was a mass incarnation of Black men.

    When it’s white, then we search for answers. Think of the difference between marijuana attitudes in the “reefer madness” days of the 1930s when the drug was perceived to be used in the “racy” parts of town, and then the 1960s (white) college town explosion in use.

    https://cdn.theatlantic.com/assets/media/img/mt/2015/08/RTX1CY7I/lead_960.jpg?1439325808

    READ MORE: http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2015/08/crack-heroin-and-race/401015/#article-comments

    • Rocco Gibraltar

      Agreed. There seems to be some racial bias. An aside: why so many commercials for drugs to help opioid users poop? Isn’t that the least of their worries?

      • Opioids slow down the passage of food through the digestive tract. If you have a healthy digestive system, you’ll become constipated. I found this out when I had to have a finger nail removed. The doctor gave me itty bitty little white pills of codine for the pain. It made me “go” like normal for the first time in a decade (at the time), so I asked for more. After a while I was afraid of getting hooked, so I stopped and went back to being miserable until I was introduced to Imodium™ years later. (I have Crohns disease)

    • John30013

      I agree. It’s disgusting that this epidemic of addiction is only now starting to be addressed because, as you rightly observe, it’s now impacting white populations. But now that it is starting to get attention, I hope something effective can be done about it.

      Our country seems to go through cycles of addictions–cocaine in the 80s, meth in the late 90s/early 2000s, and now opioids. Personally, I don’t seem to be prone to opioid addiction (at least not opioid-based pain meds), but I have great sympathy for those who are and become ensnared by them.

  • WebSlinger

    This should be watched: Chasing Heroin…it was filmed here in the Seattle area and it was REALLY eye opening

    Facing a heroin epidemic, America is experimenting with radical new approaches to the drug problem. Following four addicts in Seattle, the film examines U.S. drug policy and what happens when heroin is treated like a public health crisis, not a crime.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQLR4Tu61Ws

  • Daniel Leyva

    One more reason for people to support Hilary. Realities rather than freebies and pie in the sky.

  • JustSayin’

    sanders supporters on the floor are already trying to destroy the Democratic party.

  • thom

    Sanders was supposed to speak in the 9pm hour. Then they revised the schedule so he speaks at the end of tonight’s program in the 10pm.

    The revision came after it was clear the Sanders delegates were restive, and it ensures Bernie will be aired on the networks, not just cable

    So, why the move? My guess: the Clinton camp wants Bernie heard far & wide, think he will give a strong message that may calm his superfans.

    @jbarro

    • Lumpy Gaga

      Or, “Fuck those little fuckers. Make ’em stay here until 11PM.”

    • John30013

      While I applaud the idea, I don’t know whether anything will mollify the Sanders “superfans” at this point (short of perhaps giving the nomination to Sanders). They feel the primary was stolen from them, and while I disagree, I can see their point of view. Unfortunately, they also seem to have bought into the zeitgeist that Clinton is a dishonest dealer (I disagree, though she has handled some things poorly). I don’t think they’re much concerned about the impact to the country if Trump wins the election, especially since Trump mouths all the “outsider” platitudes and claims to be against the Trans-Pacific Partnership (which they seem to loathe). They’re so (irrationally) angry at Clinton that they’d rather see her lose at any cost.

      Worrying: On NPR today I heard one Sanders supporter say she thought Trump would be a “less dangerous” president than Clinton because she was certain that Congress would oppose anything Trump tried to do (she didn’t explain why that same Congress would be inclined to support any of Clinton’s proposals…). This is obviously delusional thinking, born of sheer animus against Clinton and not based on any political reality about Trump, Clinton, or the probable makeup of the next Congress.

  • Baby Dave

    Policy proposals:

    1) Legalize all drugs of every kind for adult recreational use. Locking people up hasn’t worked since the “War on Drugs’ began, in fact, it’s created an unregulated market that frequently leads to childhood addiction, siliklar to the unregulated alcohol market int he Prohibition era.

    2) Create safe use sites based on the model of InSite, Vancouver BC’s safe injection site, across the country. The goal ought to be keeping people alive and healthy. If and when an addict is ready to gibe the habit up, they will be alive to do so.

    3) Treat addiction as neither a crime nor a disease. Neither method works. The former criminalizes people who may not be harming anyone other than themselves, and implies (darkly) that one does not own one’s own body. The latter creates a disincentive for those afflicted to change, since there is no reason to alter your behavior if you believe you have a chronic , incurable, lifelong illness. People who contract lung cancer or COPD from smoking rarely give up the habit, perhaps because they believe it’s already too late and they want to at least enjoy themselves while they can.

    4) Monopolize sale and distribution by the state. This 1) deglamorizes use 2) allows for tighter controls on distribution, as the state can always close stores in areas heavily impacted by crime, ensure store locations are far from schools, daycares and the like, 3) restrict sale to minors, and 4) better protect against theft of product. Further, those purchasing product will have their identifying information collected at the point of sale, allowing the state to better track those whose habits have spun out of control. Such an individual can have access cut off if they are caught committing a real crime while under the influence. In states such a Washington, during the time when we had a state run monopoly on liquor, this was used to curtail alcoholism. The legal availability of product at state run stores prevented black market distribution from becoming profitable, while at the same time allowing the state to control distribution.

  • Lumpy Gaga

    Hillary’s thoughts in pic #1: “Man I used to love weekends on the pipe.”

  • Tempus Fuggit

    I am sick to goddamn death of the hackneyed phrase, “the American people”.

  • Steve Teeter

    I’ve never quite understood opioid addiction. I have quite a few of them in my medicine cabinet. Whenever I have oral surgery — which I’ve had a few times — the surgeon gives me a prescription for Vicodin or Percocet or some such. Since I have a fairly high tolerance for pain I’ve rarely taken one. When I have, in addition to some pain relief, it’s made me feel terrible. Loopy, nauseous, weirded-out. Just awful. I can understand getting hooked on something that makes you feel good initially, like heroin or alcohol. But how do you get hooked on something that makes you feel bad?