Lesbian-Themed Musical Fun Home Takes Top Prize At 2015 Tony Awards

Broadway’s first-ever musical with a lesbian protagonist, Fun Home, took the top musical prize tonight at the 2015 Tony Awards. Fun Home is based on the graphic novel by lesbian author Alison Bechdel, who last year was a recipient of the MacArthur Genius Award. Bechdel first came to national notice via her popular comic strip, Dykes To Watch Out For.

Best Musical
“Fun Home”
Best Play
“The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time”
Best Revival of a Musical
“The King and I”
Best Revival of a Play
“Skylight”
Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Play
Alex Sharp, “The Curious Incident of the Dog”
Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Play
Helen Mirren, “The Audience”
Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Musical
Michael Cerveris, “Fun Home”
Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical
Kelli O’Hara, “The King and I”
Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Play
Richard McCabe, “The Audience”
Best Performance by an Actress in Featured Role in a Play
Annaleigh Ashford, “You Can’t Take It With You”
Best Performance by an Actor in Featured Role in a Musical
Christian Borle, “Something Rotten!”
Best Performance by an Actress in Featured Role in a Musical
Ruthie Ann Miles, “The King and I”
Best Book of a Musical
“Fun Home” (Lisa Kron)

VIDEO:  Best Actor winner for Fun Home Michael Cerveris gives a shout-out to marriage equality during his acceptance speech.

UPDATE: More from the New York Times:

“Fun Home,” a poignant and raw exploration of family, memory, sexuality and suicide, on Sunday completed a long journey from the margins to the mainstream as it won the Tony Award for best new musical. The show, adapted from the best-selling graphic memoir by Alison Bechdel, bested more traditionally entertaining nominees, propelled by rapturous reviews and, in recent weeks, sold-out crowds to an unexpected victory that is likely to mean a longer run on Broadway and a longer life around the country.

The victory came at the end of Broadway’s biggest night, and suggested Tony voters were in an artistic mood this year, choosing ambitious, sophisticated productions over more conventional and commercial fare.

The Tony for best new play went to “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time,” a kinetic and evocative show about a young boy with Asperger’s syndrome; the best play revival went to “Skylight,” about a couple grappling with the aftermath of their affair against a backdrop of economic inequality; and best musical revival went to “The King and I,” a sumptuous production that emphasized the complex issues of gender and colonialism that undergird the classic favorite.